Lectures

Contents of this section:

Return to Contents Page of this issue


PROFESSOR OF POETRY

Inaugural Lecture and other lectures

The end of the poem

PROFESSOR PAUL MULDOON will lecture at 5 p.m. on the following Tuesdays, in the Examination Schools.

2 Nov.: `The end of the poem: "All Souls' Night" by W.B. Yeats.' (Inaugural Lecture)

25 Jan.: `The end of the poem: "The Literary Life" by Ted Hughes.'

2 May: `The end of the poem: "The Mountain" by Robert Frost.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


CLINICAL MEDICINE

Oxford Clinical Neorosciences Lectures

The following lectures will be held at 11.30 a.m. on Fridays in the Witts Lecture Theatre, the Radcliffe Infirmary.

DR R. HARDIE, Atkinson Morley's Hospital
16 July: `Spasticity—a resistant problem.'

DR J. BIRD, Burden Neurological Hospital, Bristol
10 Sept.: `Adult sleep disorders.'

Return to List of Contents of this section


EUROPEAN HUMANITIES RESEARCH CENTRE

Models and modifications: literature the life sciences 1890–1935

This colloquium will be held on Wednesday, 7 July, in the Old Library, All Souls College. The meeting will end with a round table discussion at 5 p.m.

There is no charge for attendace, but those intending to be present are asked to notify Professor Malcolm Bowie (All Souls College, Oxford OX1 4AL), so that appropriate seating arrangements can be made.

Conveners: Professor Malcolm Bowie, and Dr Nicola Luckhurst.

Session 1 (11 a.m.–1 p.m.)

PROFESSOR BOWIE: Introduction.

DR LUCKHURST, School of Advanced Study, University of London: `Models in Proust.'

K. WAGSTAFF, London: `Did Bergson anticipate the quantum world?'


Session 2 (2–3.15 p.m.)

M. HERWIG: ` "Sympathy with the organic": how German writers came to love biology.'

DR P. SMITH, UCL: `The scientist as spectator: Musil's Törless and the challenge to Mach's neo- positivism.'


Session 3 (3.45–5 p.m.)

DR D. BRADSHAW: ` "They should certainly be killed": eugenics and modernism in England.'

DR M. WHITWORTH, Bangor: `What's the matter?: distinguishing life from death in science and British modernism.'

Return to List of Contents of this section