Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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LECTURE LISTS: MICHAELMAS TERM 1998

Timetabling arrangements

Copy for the Michaelmas Term Lecture Lists from faculties and departments not supplying on disk should be received by Friday, 15 May.

Those faculties and departments supplying on disk are asked to provide the disk by Monday, 13 July. The lecture lists will be distributed in late September, so as to be available in the week before Noughth Week.

Disks, copy, and proofs relating to the Lecture Lists should be forwarded to Miss E. Williamson, Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant, Press Office, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

Entries shared between lists

Any faculty member who wishes to place an entry in the lecture list of another faculty or department is asked to forward the information as soon as possible directly to the other faculty.

If necessary, Miss Williamson can advise on the name of the person to contact in the appropriate faculty or department.

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Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:
Monday       9      Greek History/Latin Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7    Free

Tuesday      9      Archaeology
            10      Philosophy
            11      Literature
            12      History
            5-7    Free

Wednesday    9      Roman History/Greek Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Latin Literature/Greek History
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7    Free

Thursday     9      Literature
            10      Philosophy
            11      Greek History/Latin Literature
            12      Archaeology
            5-7    Free

Friday       9      History
            10      Philosophy
            11      Roman History/Greek Literature
            12      Archaeology/Philosophy
            5-7    Free

Sub-faculty of Languages and Literature

It is recommended that lectures for Honour Moderations should be given at the following hours whenever possible:
Homer               11 (Wednesdays, Fridays)
Virgil              11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Greek Authors       12 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
Latin Authors       11 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
Language Papers     10 (Fridays)
A                   11 (Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, TT;      
                     Mondays, Wednesdays, MT, HT)
C                   10 (Mondays, Wednesdays)
D                   10 (Tuesdays, Thursdays)
E                   12
F                   12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, HT, TT);
                    11 and 12 (Tuesdays, Thursdays, MT)

Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages

Timetable of introductory or survey lectures

The Board of the Faculty recommends that lectures should be given at the following hours:
Monday      10      French
            11      German
            12      German
Tuesday      9      Italian
            10      Spanish
            11      Italian 
            12      Spanish
Wednesday    9      Russian
            10      French
            11      Linguistics
            12      Linguistics
Thursday     9      Spanish
            10      Russian
            11      Russian
            12      Italian
Friday      10      French
            11      German
            12      Linguistics

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Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

The Board of the Faculty recommends that:

(a) lectures for the Preliminary Examination for Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should be given at the following times:

Politics    10
Economics   11
Philosophy  12 noon (or a 10 o'clock period not occupied by    
            Politics);

(b) courses of introductory lectures and lectures on compulsory subjects for undergraduates in their first three or four terms of work for the Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics should normally be given at the following times:

Politics    12 
Economics   11
Philosophy  10

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Board of the Faculty of Theology

To avoid clashes with Philosophy lectures members of the faculty are asked not to offer Theology lectures of interest to those reading for the Joint Honour School of Philosophy and Theology at the following times:

Preliminary Examination

Monday to Saturday 12

Honour School

Monday 10 and 12
Tuesday 10
Wednesday 10 and 12
Thursday 10
Friday 10 and 12
Saturday 10

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SPECIAL LECTURE LIST

Michaelmas Term 1998

The Special Lecture List for Michaelmas Term 1998 will appear shortly before term, at the same time as the ordinary Lecture Lists. It will include all appropriate lectures for Michaelmas Term published in the Gazette during Trinity Term, and also lectures of which details are received by Monday, 24 August.

Those wishing to contribute to the Special Lecture List are asked to note that this is a firm deadline, and that items received after it are unlikely to be included.

Items for the Special Lecture List should be forwarded to Miss E. Williamson, Gazette and Lecture Lists Assistant, Press Office, Oxenford House, Magdalen Street, Oxford OX1 3AB (telephone: (2)78121, fax: (2)78180, e-mail: lecture.lists@admin.ox.ac.uk).

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CHAIRMAN OF EXAMINERS

The Vice-Chancellor desires to call the attention of all examiners to the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. ii.c, § 1, clauses 1-3 (Examination Decrees, 1997, pp. 1047-8), which require examiners in all university examinations to appoint one of their number to act as Chairman, to notify the appointment to the Vice-Chancellor, and to publish it in the University Gazette.

He desires that these appointments shall be notified to the Clerk of the Schools who will inform the Vice-Chancellor and see that notice of them is duly published in the University Gazette.

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EXAMINATION SCHOOLS

Accommodation for Lectures

Michaelmas Term 1998

The Chairman of the Curators of the Schools would be grateful if Professors, Readers, and University Lecturers who wish to lecture at the Schools in Michaelmas Term 1998 could inform the Clerk of the Schools at the end of the present term. It is necessary to know whether a room suitable for an audience of more than one hundred persons is required; only the three large writing-schools will accommodate more than that number.

Afternoon lectures should normally finish by 6 p.m.

Attention is drawn to the fact that overhead projection equipment and 35-mm projectors are available. When these facilities are required the Clerk of the Schools should be notified in advance.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 29 May.

1 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Physical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Physics and Philosophy

(i) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part B examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 498, delete ll. 2–6 and substitute:

`1. The examination consists of Part A and Part B. Each part will consist of two subject areas, Physics and Philosophy. In Part A candidates will take three papers in Physics and will be examined on three subjects in Philosophy, one of these subjects being open to choice. In Part B, candidates will offer four subjects as specified in the Schedule below.'

2 Ibid, delete ll. 11–14, and substitute:

`3. Candidates for Part A must give to the Registrar notice of their choice of the optional Philosophy subject not later than Friday in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding that part of the examination. Candidates for Part B must give to the Registrar notice of their choice of written papers not later than Friday in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding that part of the examination.'

3 Ibid, delete ll. 19–45, and substitute:

`Schedule

Part A

Physics

Candidates are required to

(i) take a three-hour written paper in theoretical physics,

(ii) take two written papers on the fundamental principles of physics.

The syllabuses for the three papers under (i) and (ii) above will be specified as part of the published requirements and arrangements for Part A of the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics: four-year course). The choice of papers under (ii) above shall be approved by the Sub-Faculty of Physics and published in the Gazette by the Joint Committee for Physics and Philosophy not later than the end of the Trinity Term for examination five terms thence. Philosophy

Candidates are required to take three subjects as specified in the provisions for Physics and Philosophy in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.

Part B

Candidates are required to offer Advanced Philosophy of Physics as well as three subjects in Physics and/or Philosophy. These subjects will consist of written papers except under the conditions below.

(i) The list of subjects and syllabuses from which the Physics papers may be selected shall be approved by the Sub-Faculty of Physics and published in the Gazette by the Joint Committee for Physics and Philosophy not later than the end of the Trinity Term for examination five terms thence. Those candidates offering at least two papers in Physics may offer an essay or project in place of one of these papers. The proposed nature of the essay or project and its duration shall be submitted for approval to the Chairman of the Sub-Faculty of Physics or deputy with, in the case of a project, the agreement of the Chairman of Physics or deputy.

(ii) The syllabus of the Advanced Philosophy of Physics subject, and the list of subjects and syllabuses for those candidates offering one or more further subjects in Philosophy, are as specified in the provisions for Physics and Philosophy in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 2000 (for first Part A examination in 2001)

In Part A of the above Schedule insert under Physics:

`(iii) submit to the examiners such evidence as they may require of the successful completion of practical work normally pursued during the four terms preceding that in which the candidate is admitted to Part A of the Second Public Examination.'

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part B examination in 2002)

Under (i) in Part B of the above Schedule delete `Those candidates offering . . . in place of one of these papers.' and sub stitute `Those candidates offering at least two subjects in Physics must submit, as one of them, an essay or practical project normally undertaken in the term in which the candidate is admitted to Part B of the Second Public Examination.'

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(b) Philosophy in some Honour Schools

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 463, l. 13, after `except' insert `121 and'.

2 Ibid., p. 466, l. 50, after `Physics*' insert `(two-hour paper)'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first Part B examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 471, delete ll. 11–13 and substitute:

`Part B: candidates are required to take subject 121. Those candidates offering one or more further Philosophy subjects must choose them from the subjects 101–4, 107–99 above.'

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(iii) With effect from 1 October 2001 (for first Part B examination in 2002)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 471, ll. 17–18, delete `A candidate offering an essay or project in Physics may not take subject 199 in Philosophy.'

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2 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

(a) Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 49, delete ll. 11–27 and substitute:

`Section 5. Procedural Programming and Digital Design

Practical weight: one-sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Procedural Programming: Imperative programming constructs, with informal treatment of invariants. Procedures and modules; their use in the design of large programs. Data structures, including arrays, records, and pointers. Basic tools for program development. Case studies in design of medium-sized programs.

Digital Design: Simple design of combinational and sequential circuits; standard design elements. Computer arithmetic for integers and floating-point numbers; basic error analysis. Register transfer level design of a simple microprocessor with microcode. Simple programming in assembly language. Functions of assemblers, compilers, and linkers'.

(b) Preliminary Examination in Mathematics and Computation

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

As for Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation (see (a) above).

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3 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

(a) M.Phil. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 576, after l. 8, insert:

`[Until 30 September 1999: candidates admitted in Michaelmas Term 1997 may take the examination according to the 1997 regulations.]'.

2 Ibid., after l. 10, insert:

`1. Every candidate must follow for at least six terms a course of instruction in Economic and Social History and must upon entering for the examination produce from his or her society a certificate to that effect.'

3 Ibid., l. 11, delete `1.' and substitute `2.'

4 Ibid., ll. 17 and 19, after `science' insert `, medicine'.

5 Ibid., l. 49, delete `All candidates will' and insert `Candidates may'.

6 Ibid., p. 577, ll. 14, 16, 18, 19, and 25, renumber cll. `2'– `6' as `3'–`7' respectively.

7 Ibid., l. 26, before `attempt' insert `initial'.

8 Ibid., delete l. 32, and, on ll. 33–9, renumber papers `1.2'–`1.8' as `1.1'–`1.7' respectively.

9 Ibid., after l. 39 insert:

`1.8 Environment and development in twentieth-century southern and central Africa

1.9 Spatial and historical perspectives on contemporary Russian economic issues

1.10 The economic history of Russia and the Soviet Union, 1900–1991'.

10 Ibid., p. 578, delete 1.2. 11 Ibid., after l. 9, insert `5.5 History, society, and the modern body'.

12 Ibid., delete ll. 10–17.

13 Ibid., ll. 18, 26, 38, and 48, and p. 579, ll. 7, 17, and 26, renumber papers `1.2'–`1.8' as `1.1'–`1.7' respectively.

14 Ibid., p. 579, l. 7, delete `1870' and substitute `1850'.

15 Ibid., after l. 34, insert:

`1.8 Environment and development in twentieth-century southern and central Africa: a historical approach

This eight seminar option on southern and central Africa explores the possibilities of an environmental approach to history. The focus is largely on the twentieth century. Settler colonialism, imperial rule, the commercialisation of agriculture and the growth of industry have had profound effects both on the societies and the natural world of the region. Conservationist strategies were also intensely debated from the late nineteenth century onwards. The option will examine these issues in the context of economic and social change, and with an eye on explaining contemporary African problems. It will also introdeuce students to discussions of such ideas as preservation and conservation, degradation and transformation, sustainability and development.

The readings for each meeting will be organised on a thematic basis. Major themes include: hunting and game conservation; disease, ecology and the state; the impact of settler and peasant agriculture; political conflicts over state regulation of natural resources and their role in rural and nationalist movements; drought, famine, and poverty; deforestation and fuel resources; property regimes and the environment; urbanisation, industry, and their environmental impact.

1.9 Spatial and historical perspectives on contemporary Russian economic issues

This course is concerned with spatial and evolutionary dimensions of Russian economic institutions over the past two centuries. A central theme is the bearing of the historical features of institutions on the role and policies of government, particularly in the present. Emphasis will be placed on path dependent processes, and the understandings from development literature and geography that help to explain them, on the shaping of property rights and corporate law, agrarian institutions, the development of science, and fiscal and financial structures. The framework for the analysis of the institutions and policies by which Russia's economy has been organised and governed will be blocks of years inclusive of reforms and their implementation. Historical materials will be drawn selectively from the 1860s through the 1880s, the 1890s to 1913, the revolution and the NEP, collectivisation and the First Five Year Plan, and the 1950s through mid-1960s.

1.10 The economic history of Russia and the Soviet Union, 1900–1991

This paper covers the history of the economies in Tsarist Russia during 1900–17 and in the Soviet Union during 1917–91. The Tsarist economy section, which accounts for about one-quarter of the paper, examines issues such as the emancipation of the serfs, industrialisation, fiscal and monetary policy, foreign economic relations, and the war economy during 1914–17. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the evolution of the command economy in the USSR (War Communism, New Economic Policy, Stalinist central planning, regionalisation during the Khrushchev period, the mature command economy under Brezhnev). But emphasis is placed on knowledge of the features and policies of the Soviet command system (e.g., central planning, performance of state enterprises, fiscal and monetary policies, foreign trade), rather than of the details of economic history. The final section of the paper examines the economic reforms during the perestroika, economic collapse and the break-up of the Soviet Un ion.'.

16 Ibid., p. 582, delete ll. 22–31.

17 Ibid., delete p. 583, l. 41 to p. 584, l. 2.

18 Ibid., ll. 3 and 16, renumber papers `5.4' and `5.5' as `5.3' and `5.4' respectively.

19 Ibid. after l. 29, insert:

`5.5 History, society, and the modern body

The human body has emerged as a subject of historical inquiry in recent studies, especially in the history of medicine and its allied sciences. Assuming that the body is not given directly to perception, but is understood differently in different historical settings, we can begin to examine how the body has been constructed through medical practices and social routines. This course examines some of the diverse literature on human embodiment, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and disease, taking a broad approach, and drawing on history and the social sciences, with a special focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics include the politics of anatomy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the normal and the deviant body; sexualities; reproduction and childbirth; race, gender, and disease; women's work in medicine and health.'

20 Ibid., p . 584, delete ll. 32–41.

21 Ibid., ll. 42, 50, and p. 585, ll. 8, 11, renumber cll. 2–5 as 1–4 respectively.

22 Ibid., p. 584, ll. 43 and 50, delete `(b)' and substitute `(a)'.

23 Ibid., p. 585, ll. 12–13, delete `in paragraphs 1–3 above (see notes (a) and (c))' and substitute `in paragraphs 1 to 2 above (see note (b)).'

24 Ibid., delete ll. 15–23, and substitute:

`(a) Candidates wishing to take a paper under 1, 2, or 4 will need to satisfy the appropriate Graduate Studies Committee of the relevant faculty board or inter-faculty committee that they have an adequate background in that subject.

(b) The chosen subject must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies of the Modern History Faculty not later than Monday of the fourth week of the first Michaelmas Term of the course. Candidates will not be allowed to offer a paper from a Final Honour School examination under 4 in a subject they have already studied for a previous degree.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Economic and Social History

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 749, l. 49, and p. 750, l. 2, after `science', insert `, medicine'.

2 Ibid., after l. 11 insert:

`Candidates must take at least one of their papers as a three-hour written examination. For the remaining paper candidates must choose to be assessed either by written examination or by two 5,000 word essays. Essays may be only submitted in lieu of written papers for subjects in Schedule I of the M.Phil. in Economic and Social History or for other papers permitted in the schedule below where similar provision exists in the regulations for those examinations. The essays must be the work of the candidates alone and they must not consult any other person including their supervisors in any way concerning either the choice of themes or the method of handling the themes chosen. The themes chosen by the candidate must be submitted for approval by the chairman of examiners, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than the Monday of the fifth week of Hilary Term. Candidates will be informed within two weeks, by means of a letter directed to their colleges, whether the topics they have submitted have been approved. The finished essays must be delivered by the candidate to the Clerk of the Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the third week of Trinity Full Term. The essays must be presented in proper scholarly form, and two typed copies of each must be submitted. Candidates may be examined viva voce on the subjects on which they submit essays. Candidates who have not delivered essays as prescribed by the due date on any of their subjects must sit the written examination in those subjects.'

3 Ibid., delete from p. 750, l. 39 to p. 751, l. 4.

4 Ibid., p. 751, ll. 5, 15, and 18, renumber cll. `3'–`5' as `1'– `3' respectively.

5 Ibid., l. 5, delete `(b)' and substitute `(a)'.

6 Ibid., ll. 19–20, delete `paragraphs 1 to 4 above (see notes (a) and (c)' and substitute `paragraphs 1 and 2 above (see note (b))'.

7 Ibid., delete ll. 22 to 30 and substitute:

(a) Candidates wishing to take an M.Phil. paper under 1 will need to satisfy the appropriate Graduate Studies Committee of the Social Studies Board that they have an adequate background in that subject.

(b) The chosen subject must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies of the Modern History Faculty not later than Monday of the fourth week of the first Michaelmas Term of the course. Candidates will not be allowed to offer a paper from a Final Honuor School examination under 3 in a subject they have already studied for a previous degree.'

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4 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Moderations in Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies)

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 66, after l. 35 (as amended by the Decree establishing Moderations in Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies)) insert:

`Regulations

Candidates offering Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies are required to offer four three-hour papers: 1, 2

Either

Akkadian texts. (Lists are available from the Oriental Institute) and Akkadian grammar and unprepared translation.

Or

Egyptian texts: Middle Egyptian texts, ed. Baines and Smith. (Copies are available from the Oriental Institute) and Middle Egyptian grammar and unprepared translation.

3. Civilisations of the Ancient Near East.

4. History of the Ancient Near East to 30 bce.'

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(b) Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 94, ll. 12–13, delete

`Ancient Egyptian' and substitute `Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies'.

2 Ibid., delete ll. 34–40 and substitute:

`Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

Each candidate shall offer the papers specified for Moderations save that candidates who have passed any paper or papers in Moderations need not offer those papers again.'

3 Ibid., in the footnote after l. 44, after `in Chinese' insert `or Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies'.

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(c) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies)

With effect from 2000 (for first examination in 2001)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 435, before l. 1, delete `Egyptology' from the column listing main subjects and substitute `Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies'.

2 Ibid., delete from l. 29 on p. 443 to l. 13 on p. 444, and substitute:

`Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies

The languages which may be offered shall be:

As first language: Akkadian or Egyptian

As second language (which must be different from the first language):

Akkadian
Egyptian
Arabic
Aramaic and Syriac
Classics
Coptic
Hebrew (Biblical and Mishnaic)
Hittite (may not be available every year)
Old Iranian
Sumerian

The following papers will be set:

1. Translation paper (first language).

2.Translation paper (second language).

3. 4. Literary and historical topics including prepared translation from first language.

5. 6. Literary and historical topics including prepared translation from second language.

For papers 4 and 6, in each case four passages from a list of prescribed texts will be set for examination by essay. For each paper, candidates must present a translation of and essay on one passage. Papers should be typed and provided with proper scholarly apparatus. The passages for paper 4 will be assigned in the Oriental Institute at 10 a.m. on Monday of First Week in Full Term in the term in which the final examination is to be offered, and must be handed in to the Clerk of the Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Monday of Second Week. A signed statement that the essay is the candidate's own work should be submitted separately in a sealed envelope bearing his or her candidate number, to the Chairman of examiners (forms are available from the Faculty Office, Oriental Institute). The passages for paper 6 will be assigned in the Oriental Institute at 10 a.m. on Monday of Third Week in Full Term in the term in which the final examination is to be offered, and must be handed in to the Clerk of the Examination Schools no later than 12 noon on Monday of Fourth Week. Essays should not exceed 3,500 words. A signed statement that the essay is the candidate's own work should be submitted separately in a sealed envelope bearing his or her candidate number, to the Chairman of examiners (forms are available from the Faculty Office, Oriental Institute). Lists of prescribed texts for papers 3–6 are available from the Oriental Institute. In the case of candidates offering Classics, they must offer for papers 2, 5 and 6 three of subjects (i)–(xxiv) listed under Classics as an additional language in Oriental Studies.

7. A field of concentration to be chosen from a list of topics published at the beginning of Michaelmas Term each year by the Oriental Studies Faculty Board for examination in the following academic year. Candidates may propose their own field of concentration. The choice must be approved by the Board in each case.

8. Selected Egyptian and/or Ancient Near Eastern artefacts (one and a half hours, to be examined in the Ashmolean Museum and to have half the weight of the other papers).

9. General paper, including questions on Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies today.

10. A dissertation on a topic to be approved by the Faculty Board, of a different character from that chosen for paper 7.

11. An optional special subject to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, including topics such as have been approved under the present FHS syllabuses in Hebrew, and the additional language syllabus in Classics.'

3 Ibid., p. 453, l. 36, delete `Egyptology'.

4 Ibid., p. 454, l. 9, delete `(for candidates offering Egyptology as main subject)'.

5 Ibid., delete from l. 39 on p. 453 to l. 18 on p. 454, and substitute:

`1, 2, 3 = Papers 2, 5 and 6 as specified for Akkadian in the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies). (Instead of either paper 5 or paper 6, candidates may offer one of papers 7–10 as specified for the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies).'

6 Ibid., p. 458, delete ll. 19–23 and substitute:

`1, 2, 3 = Papers 2, 5 and 6 as specified for Egyptian in the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies). (Instead of either paper 5 or paper 6, candidates may offer one of papers 7–10 as specified for the Honour School of Oriental Studies (Egyptology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies).'

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5 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 494, delete ll. 20–31 and substitute:

`(1) Christian Moral Concepts

The major moral concepts in Christian thought, such as: love, natural and revealed law, the supreme good, conscience, virtues, sin, justification, and grace; and their contribution to contemporary discussions. Candidates may treat questions on these subjects primarily with reference to their sources in the Bible, if they so wish.

(2) Government and its tasks

Theological interpretations of: justice, law, and authority; forms of government, local, national, and international; government, society and the church; the coercive use of force in punishment and war, responsibilities for education, employment, economy, and environment.'

2 Ibid, renumber existing cll. 4 and 5 and cll. 3 and 4.

(b) Honour School of Theology

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

In Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 520, delete ll. 20–3 and substitute:

`(11) Candidates may offer either

A. Christian Life and Thought in Europe, 1789–1914 Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the life and thought of the Christian Church (with special reference to Britain) and the development of Christian theology in its historical context. Candidates will be given opportunity to demonstrate knowledge of the following texts:

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion
J.H. Newman, Lectures on the Prophetical office
A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation, vol. III
S. Kierkegaard, Philosophical Fragments
L. Feuerbach, The Essays of Christianity

or

B. Christology from Kant to Troeltsch 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the impact of modern philosophy and of cultural and historical criticism on Christology, as reflected in some of the following writers: Kant, Schleiermacher, Hegel, Strauss, Baur, Kierkegaard, Thomasius, Ritschl, Kèhler, Neitzsche, Harnack, Wrede, Schweitzer, Kautskey, and Troeltsch. Candidates will be required to comment on a selection of the following texts:

I. Kant, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone (Harper Torchbooks, 1960), pp. 85–138.

F.D.E. Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark, 1956), pp. 374–475.

G.W.F. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, ed. P.C. Hodgson (University of California Press, 1985), vol. III, pp. 310–47.

D.F. Strauss, The Life of Jesus Critically Examined, ed. P.C. Hodgson (Fortress, 1972), pp. 40–63 and 757–84; The Christ of Faith and the Jesus of History, ed. L.E. Keck (Fortress, 1977), pp. 19–37 and 159–69.

C. Thomasius, Christ's Person and Work, Part 2: The Person of the Mediator, in God and Incarnation in Mid Nineteenth Century German Theology, ed. C. Welch (Oxford University Press, 1965), pp. 31–88.

A. Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation (T. and T. Clark, 1900, reprint 1966), Vol. III, pp. 385–484.

M. Kèhler, The So-Called Historical Jesus and the Historic Bible Christ, ed. C.E. Braaten (Fortress, 1964), pp. 46–97.

E. Troeltsch, `The Significance of the Historical Existence of Jesus for Faith' in Ernst Troeltsch: Writings on Theology and Religion, ed. R. Morgan and M. Pye (Duckworth, 1977), pp. 182–207.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committees give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Clinical Medicine

A.O. OGUNLESI, Balliol: `Human immunodeficiency virus genetic variation and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response'.
St Hugh's, Monday, 1 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.M. Esiri, H. Whittle.

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English Language and Literature

D.R. GOWEN, St Catherine's: `Studies in the history and function of the British theatre playbill and programme, 1564–1914'.
English Faculty, Friday, 15 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: D.F. McKenzie, P.H. Davison.

J. MILLER, Magdalen: `Lazamon's Brut and English his- toriography'.
St Cross Building, Friday, 22 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.M. Hudson, F. Riddy.

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Law

T. KREBS, Christ Church: `Failure of consideration: a comparative study'.
Worcester, Thursday, 2 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: G. Dannemann, K. Barker.

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Literae Humaniores

A.I. WILSON, Magdalen: `Water management and usage in Roman North Africa'.
St John's, Monday, 25 May, 5 p.m.
Examiners: N. Purcell, R.J.A. Wilson.

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Physical Sciences

N. BIRD, Mansfield: `The mechanical properties of gamma-TiA1 based single crystals'.
Department of Materials, Friday, 19 June, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: S.G. Roberts, I. Jones.

J. DYER, Linacre: `New approaches to functionalised pyrrolidines'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Thursday, 18 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: C.J. Schofield, D. Young.

A. MUXWORTHY, Worcester: `Stability of magnetic remanence in multidomain magnetite'.
Department of Earth Sciences, Saturday, 16 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: J.C. Briden, D.F. Heider.

R. THOMAS, Exeter: `Microstructure development in multi- component alloys'.
Department of Materials, Thursday, 21 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: P.S. Grant, H. Jones.

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Social Studies

S. GREGG, St Antony's: `Challenging the modern world: Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II and the development of Catholic social teaching (with specific reference to in- dustrial relations, capitalism, and relations between developed and developing nations)'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 22 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.F. Charles, F. McHugh.

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Committee for Archaeology

G.N. DAVIES, University: `Economic geography of the ancient Greek countryside: a re-examination of monumental rural sites on the island of Siphnos'.
Lady Margaret Hall, Thursday, 21 May, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: S.R.F. Price, S. Hodkinson.

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Committee for Management Studies

M.S. VAN OSNABRUGGE, Hertford: `The financing of entrepreneurial firms in the UK: a comparison of business angel and venture capitalist investment procedures'.
Keble, Tuesday, 19 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: T.J. Jenkinson, W.E. Wetzel.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Biological Sciences

N. RAHMAN-HUQ, Hertford: `A study of microvascular brain basement membrane'.
Glycobiology Institute, Friday, 22 May, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R.A. Dwek, H.M. Charlton.

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