Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1998

Preliminary Examination

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: J.F. STEIN, B.SC., BM, MA, Fellow of Magdalen

Honour Schools

Archaeology and Anthropology: A.G. SHERRATT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Linacre (address: Ashmolean Museum)

Mathematics II: M. LUNN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Hugh's

Natural Science: Biological Sciences: N.J. KRUGER, MA, Fellow of St Cross (address: Department of Plant Sciences)

Corrigendum

Mathematics I: W.A. SUTHERLAND, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College

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Master of Business Administration

D.O. FAULKNER, MA, D.PHIL., Student of Christ Church

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Master of Philosophy

English Studies Courses III, IV, and V: D.J. WOMERSLEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Jesus

European Politics and Society\: A. MENON, MA, Fellow of St Antony's

General Linguistics and Comparative Philology: J.S. COLEMAN, MA, Fellow of Wolfson (address: Phonetics Laboratory)

Politics: D.G. GOLDEY, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Lincoln

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Master of Science

Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management: R. UNDY, MA, Fellow of Templeton

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Master of Studies

General Linguistics and Comparative Philology: J.S. COLEMAN, MA, Fellow of Wolfson (address: Phonetics Laboratory)

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Master of Theology

G.W. WOOLFENDEN, MA status, Ripon College

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Foreign Service Programme

Certificate in Diplomatic Studies: SIR ROBIN FEARN, MA, Fellow of University

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APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINERS

FIRST PUBLIC EXAMINATION

Preliminary Examination: Modern Languages: German

Corrigendum

In the list of appointment of examiners, published in Gazette, p. 407 (20 November 1997), delete:

`C.W. EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Oriel (vice Leeder)' and substitute:

`C.W. EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Jesus (vice Leeder)'.

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SUB-FACULTY OF PHYSICS

HONOUR SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE (PHYSICS)

In accordance with the regulations for the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics), the following syllabuses are published by the Sub-faculty of Physics.

Syllabuses for Part B of the Second Public Examination of the Four Year Course (Trinity Term 1999)

Two written papers of three hours chosen from the following subjects 1. to 6.

1. Astrophysics

Stellar physics. Theory of stellar photospheres; continuous and absorption-line spectra; chromospheres and coronae; emission-line formation; physics of stellar interiors; structure of main-sequence stars; post-main-sequence evolution; degenerate stars; supernovae.

Normal galaxies. Features of normal galaxies, galaxy classification; stellar dynamics; rotation curves and mass estimates; dark matter in galaxies; the Milky Way galaxy.

High-energy astrophysics: basic physics of interactions between high energy particles and radiation; interacting binary stellar systems, black holes; active galactic nuclei and relativistic jets.

2. Atoms, Lasers and Optics

The option includes the essential features of experimental techniques and important practical considerations in addition to theoretical concepts. A knowledge of atomic physics at the level of the A-papers is assumed e.g. the Normal and Anomalous Zeeman effect.

Atoms:

Atomic and molecular spectra and structure:
Hydrogen and hydrogen-like systems, alkali atoms, helium and atoms with two electrons outside closed shells. Diatomic molecules. Selection rules and techniques of spectroscopy.

Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and manipulation of atoms:
Homonuclear molecules. Hyperfine structure including effects of external magnetic fields. Optical pumping. Doppler-free laser spectroscopy. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and ions.

Lasers:

The theory of the laser with some important examples of gas and solid-state lasers:
Einstein A and B coefficients for the treatment of the interaction of radiation and atoms. Linewidths and lineshapes. Amplification by stimulated emission and the laser oscillator. Cavity effects. Gas lasers (He-Ne, He-Cd+, argon-ion and copper vapours). Solid state lasers (ruby and Nd:YAG).

Survey of laser systems:
High power infrared molecular lasers. Lasers operating in the ultraviolet. Dye lasers. Semiconductor lasers. Diode pumped solid-state lasers. Use of lasers in chemical physics.

Optics:

Diffraction and other phenomena related to lasers:
Fourier transforms. Gaussian beams and their propagation. Cavity eigenfunctions. Electro-optic effect. Second harmonic generation.

Advanced optics:
Coherence. Holography. Nonlinear optics (third-order effects in atoms and molecules and their applications).

3. Condensed Matter Physics

Crystal structures. Reciprocal lattices, Brillouin zones. Structure determination - X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction. Symmetry.

Acoustic and optic phonons: measurements of phonon dispersion. Anharmonicity: thermal properties. Structural phase changes.

Electrons in a periodic potential. Band gaps: electron dispersion: effective mass. Fermi surfaces. Semiconductors. Transport of heat and electrical current in metals and semiconductors. Landau Quantisation. Low dimensional structures.

Interband optical transitions and excitons. Plasmons. Infra-red absorption/reflectivity and Raman scattering from phonons. Nonlinear optical properties. Applications.

Diamagnetism. Crystal field theory: paramagnetism. Magnetic ordering and phase transitions. Low dimensional magnetism. Spin waves. Magnetic resonance. Critical phenomena. Domains. Applications.

Bose condensation and superfluids. Convential, organic and high Tc superconductors: thermodynamics, London and BCS theories. Josephson effects. Applications.

No more than one question may be set on experimental work performed as part of this subject.

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4. Particle Physics

Experimental Techniques. Physics of accelerators. Colliders and fixed targets. Event rates and luminosity. Triggers and signal and background processes. Physics of particle detectors. Applications to real experiments. Wire chambers, silicon detectors, calorimeters and muon chambers.

Quark Structure of Hadrons. Deep inelastic scattering, the quark-parton model and QCD. Light hadron masses, magnetic moments and EM decays. Heavy quark states.

Theoretical Principles. Breit-Wigner resonance. Elementary introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Matrix elements. Discrete and continuous symmetries. Applications of gauge symmetries.

Applications to the Standard Model. Charged current (CC) weak interactions. V-A theory. Universality of CC. 2 and 4 component neutrino theory. Oscillations in the Ko And Bo system. Discovery of the top quark. Electroweak symmetry breaking. The Z resonance and number of neutrino species.

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5. Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans

Structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Atmospheric thermodynamics. Energy sources, sinks and transport. Cloud physics.

Fluid motions on a rotating planet. Scale analysis, hydrostatic and geostrophic balance. Inertio-gravity waves. Conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Vorticity, Rossby waves. Boundary layers. Boundary currents. Weather forecasting. Predictability and chaos.

The atmospheric radiation budget. Solar radiation. Radiative transfer. Radiative equilibrium. The Greenhouse Effect. Molecular spectra and line shapes.

Atmospheric chemistry, ozone. Catalytic cycles. The Ozone Hole.

Remote sounding of atmospheres. Absorption and emission spectroscopy. Techniques and data interpretation. Satellite and ground-based instrumentation. Current measurement programmes.

Climate and climate variability. Paleoclimates.

Physics and dynamics of planetary atmospheres.

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6. Theoretical Physics

Statistical physics: statistical mechanics of interacting systems, cooperative ordering, mean field theory, numerical approaches, scaling and criticality, renormalization group ideas. Stochastic processes, random walks, Brownian motion, Markov processes, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations.

Quantum mechanics: scattering theory for non-relativistic particles; relativistic quantum mechanics; many-particle systems; path-integral formulation.

Classical fields: covariant formulation of electrodynamics, gauge invariance, retarded potentials, dipole radiation. General Relativity, the equivalence principle, Einstein's equations, geodesics, perihelion of Mercury, simple applications to cosmology.

One written paper of 1½ hours

The Syllabuses for this paper, are as for Part B of the Second Public Examination of the three-year course (Trinity Term 1997) except that the topic 'Mathematical Physics' will not be available (see page 3.).

Candidates offering subject 2 (Atomic and Laser Physics) may not answer questions on topic B.

Candidates may replace the 1½ hour paper by an assessed course in a foreign language as specified in the regulations for the three year course.

Candidates may propose to the Chairman of the Sub-Faculty of Physics or deputy, not later than the first week of the Trinity full term of the academic year preceding that in which the examination is taken, another subject paper or papers to replace the written paper of 1½ hours.

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JOINT COMMITTEE FOR PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

HONOUR SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

Syllabuses for Part B of the Second Public Examination (Trinity Term 1999)

(a) One written paper of three hours chosen from the following Major Option subjects 1. to 6., and

(b) either: one written paper of one and a half hours from the Minor Option topics, the syllabuses for which are published by the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1998

or: an essay or a project in Physics [subject to the proviso that no candidate may offer both an essay or project on Physics and Subject 199 in Philosophy].

Major Options

1. Astrophysics

Stellar physics. Theory of stellar photospheres; continuous and absorption-line spectra; chromospheres and coronae; emission-line formation; physics of stellar interiors; structure of main-sequence stars; post-main-sequence evolution; degenerate stars; supernovae.

Normal galaxies. Features of normal galaxies, galaxy classification; stellar dynamics; rotation curves and mass estimates; dark matter in galaxies; the Milky Way galaxy.

High-energy astrophysics: basic physics of interactions between high energy particles and radiation; interacting binary stellar systems, black holes; active galactic nuclei and relativistic jets.

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2. Atoms, Lasers and Optics

The option includes the essential features of experimental techniques and important practical considerations in addition to theoretical concepts. A knowledge of atomic physics at the level of the A-papers is assumed e.g. the Normal and Anomalous Zeeman effect.

Atoms:

Atomic and molecular spectra and structure:
Hydrogen and hydrogen-like systems, alkali atoms, helium and atoms with two electrons outside closed shells. Diatomic molecules. Selection rules and techniques of spectroscopy.

Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and manipulation of atoms:
Homonuclear molecules. Hyperfine structure including effects of external magnetic fields. Optical pumping. Doppler-free laser spectroscopy. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and ions.

Lasers:

The theory of the laser with some important examples of gas and solid-state lasers:
Einstein A and B coefficients for the treatment of the interaction of radiation and atoms. Linewidths and lineshapes. Amplification by stimulated emission and the laser oscillator. Cavity effects. Gas lasers (He-Ne, He-Cd+, argon-ion and copper vapours). Solid state lasers (ruby and Nd:YAG).

Survey of laser systems:
High power infrared molecular lasers. Lasers operating in the ultraviolet. Dye lasers. Semiconductor lasers. Diode pumped solid-state lasers. Use of lasers in chemical physics.

Optics:

Diffraction and other phenomena related to lasers:
Fourier transforms. Gaussian beams and their propagation. Cavity eigenfunctions. Electro-optic effect. Second harmonic generation.

Advanced optics:
Coherence. Holography. Nonlinear optics (third-order effects in atoms and molecules and their applications).

3. Condensed Matter Physics Crystal structures. Reciprocal lattices, Brillouin zones. Structure determination - X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction. Symmetry.

Acoustic and optic phonons: measurements of phonon dispersion. Anharmonicity: thermal properties. Structural phase changes.

Electrons in a periodic potential. Band gaps: electron dispersion: effective mass. Fermi surfaces. Semiconductors. Transport of heat and electrical current in metals and semiconductors. Landau Quantisation. Low dimensional structures.

Interband optical transitions and excitons. Plasmons. Infra-red absorption/reflectivity and Raman scattering from phonons. Nonlinear optical properties. Applications.

Diamagnetism. Crystal field theory: paramagnetism. Magnetic ordering and phase transitions. Low dimensional magnetism. Spin waves. Magnetic resonance. Critical phenomena. Domains. Applications.

Bose condensation and superfluids. Convential, organic and high Tc superconductors: thermodynamics, London and BCS theories. Josephson effects. Applications.

No more than one question may be set on experimental work performed as part of this subject.

4. Particle Physics

Experimental Techniques. Physics of accelerators. Colliders and fixed targets. Event rates and luminosity. Triggers and signal and background processes. Physics of particle detectors. Applications to real experiments. Wire chambers, silicon detectors, calorimeters and muon chambers. Quark Structure of Hadrons. Deep inelastic scattering, the quark-parton model and QCD. Light hadron masses, magnetic moments and EM decays. Heavy quark states.

Theoretical Principles. Breit-Wigner resonance. Elementary introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Matrix elements. Discrete and continuous symmetries. Applications of gauge symmetries.

Applications to the Standard Model. Charged current (CC) weak interactions. V-A theory. Universality of CC. 2 and 4 component neutrino theory. Oscillations in the Ko And Bo system. Discovery of the top quark. Electroweak symmetry breaking. The Z resonance and number of neutrino species.

5. Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans

Structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Atmospheric thermodynamics. Energy sources, sinks and transport. Cloud physics.

Fluid motions on a rotating planet. Scale analysis, hydrostatic and geostrophic balance. Inertio-gravity waves. Conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Vorticity, Rossby waves. Boundary layers. Boundary currents. Weather forecasting. Predictability and chaos.

The atmospheric radiation budget. Solar radiation. Radiative transfer. Radiative equilibrium. The Greenhouse Effect. Molecular spectra and line shapes.

Atmospheric chemistry, ozone. Catalytic cycles. The Ozone Hole.

Remote sounding of atmospheres. Absorption and emission spectroscopy. Techniques and data interpretation. Satellite and ground-based instrumentation. Current measurement programmes.

Climate and climate variability. Paleoclimates.

Physics and dynamics of planetary atmospheres.

6. Theoretical Physics

Statistical physics: statistical mechanics of interacting systems, cooperative ordering, mean field theory, numerical approaches, scaling and criticality, renormalization group ideas. Stochastic processes, random walks, Brownian motion, Markov processes, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations.

Quantum mechanics: scattering theory for non-relativistic particles; relativistic quantum mechanics; many-particle systems; path-integral formulation.

Classical fields: covariant formulation of electrodynamics, gauge invariance, retarded potentials, dipole radiation. General Relativity, the equivalence principle, Einstein's equations, geodesics, perihelion of Mercury, simple applications to cosmology.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Anthropology and Geography

J.H. PALMER, Exeter: `Wichi Goodwill: ethnographic allusions'.
Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Monday, 8 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J. Overing, R.H. Barnes.

Biological Sciences

R.A.C. CLARK, Trinity: `Characterisation of neural glycoproteins'.
St John's, Friday, 12 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P. Beesley, I.D. Campbell.

C.A. KEON, Wolfson: `Myocardial energy transduction in the working rat heart'.
Lady Margaret Hall, Friday, 12 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A. Halestrap, G.K. Brown.

I. MILLWOOD, Green College: `A genetic linkage map of the rat X chromosome'.
Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Wednesday, 10 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: Y. Boyd, A. Dominiczak.

J.P. NEWTON, St John's: `Structure and function of CD31'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Friday, 19 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: N. Hogg, D.G. Jackson.

K.R. WILSON, Linacre: `Baculovirus insecticides: the development of long-term control strategies based on ecological criteria'.
University Museum of Natural History, Friday, 5 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: F. Hunter, S.J. Simpson.
Note: Under the terms of the relevant decree (Examination Decrees, 1997, p. 837), attendance is restricted to the examiners and the candidate.

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Clinical Medicine

C. MACLENNAN, Green College: `Acetylcholine receptor subunit gene expression in different human muscle groups and the thymus. A study of healthy subjects and of those with disordered neuromuscular transmission'.
St John's, Thursday, 11 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: K.C. Gatter, R. Schoepfer.

C.A. MCKENZIE, Green College: `Genetics of cardiovascular disease: an examination of two candidate genes in the renin-angiotensin system'.
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Tuesday, 9 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R.H. Ward, R.D. Soubrier.

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English Language and Literature

R. BHATTACHARJEA, St Anne's: `Anthony Munday and the representation of religious resistance in the late Elizabethan drama'.
Magdalen, Friday, 5 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: D.G.E. Norbrook, C. Belsey.

A. BRAIDA, St Catherine's: `Henry Francis Cary's The Vision and its literary context'.
Lady Margaret Hall, Friday, 5 December, 3 p.m.
Examiners: N.G. Shrimpton, R. Pite.

S.B. FANOUS, Pembroke: `Biblical and hagiographical imitatio in the Book of Margery Kempe'.
St Cross Building, Friday, 12 December, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: D. Gray, S.S. Hussey.

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Mathematical Sciences

S. NOBLE, New College: `Complexity of graph polynomials'.
Mathematical Institute, Thursday, 11 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: K.J. Edwards, C.J.H. McDiarmid.

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Modern History

K.O. BERENDS, St Catherine's: `"Thus saith the Loard:" the Bible and the Southern Evangelical world view in the era of the American Civil War'.
Mansfield, Friday, 12 December, 5 p.m.
Examiners: J.C. Brock, R.J. Carwardine.

S. KINGSTON, Oriel: `The political development of Ulster and the Lordship of the Isles, 1394–1499'.
All Souls, Monday, 15 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: R.R. Davies, R.F. Frame.

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Music

T.M. MORRIS, New College: `The Augustinian use of Oseney Abbey: a study of the Oseney ordinal, processional, and tonale (Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson C.939)'.
Oriel, Thursday, 11 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R.A. Cross, J. Harper.

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Oriental Studies

M. BUNTON, St Antony's: `The role of private property in the British administration of Palestine, 1917–36'.
St Antony's, Wednesday, 10 December, 3.30 p.m.
Examiners: M.E. Yapp, P.J. Robins.

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Physical Sciences

E.C. BOSWELL, Trinity: `Field emission from porous silicon'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 10 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A. Cerezo, M. Elgomati.

A.F. LOVEGROVE, Wolfson: `Bifurcations and instabilities in rotating two-layer fluids'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Tuesday, 16 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J. Brindley, T.W.N. Haine.

E. POTTERTON, Corpus Christi: `Sum-frequency spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on crystal surfaces'.
Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Friday, 12 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P.B. Davies, R.G. Compton.

N.P. PROUKAKIS, New College: `Microscopic mean field theories of trapped Bose–Einstein condensates'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Monday, 15 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: A.K. Ekert, R.J. Ballagh.

W.J. WADSWORTH, Exeter: `Copper vapour laser pumped Ti: sapphire lasers'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Friday, 5 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: A.I. Ferguson, P.E.G. Baird.

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Physiological Sciences

N. COHEN, Trinity: `Development of the corticospinal delussation'.
University Laboratory of Physiology, Monday, 8 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: I.D. Thompson, J. Cohen.

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Social Studies

ZHICHAO ZHANG, St Hugh's: `Exchange rate reform in China 1978–94'.
New College, Tuesday, 9 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: C.J. Allsopp, M. Lu.

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