Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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SUB-FACULTY OF PHYSICS

In accordance with the regulations for the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics), the following syllabuses are published by the Sub-faculty of Physics.

HONOUR SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE (PHYSICS)

Syllabuses for Part B of the Second Public Examination of the

Four Year Course (Trinity Term 1998) Two written papers of three hours chosen from the following subjects 1. to 6.

1. Astrophysics

Stellar physics. Theory of stellar photospheres; continuous and absorption-line spectra; chromospheres and coronae; emission-line formation; physics of stellar interiors; structure of main-sequence stars; post-main-sequence evolution; degenerate stars; supernovae.

Normal galaxies. Kinematics of our own Galaxy, globular clusters; galaxy morphology and luminosity functions; mass estimates; groups and clusters of galaxies.

High-energy astrophysics: basic physics of interactions between high energy particles and radiation; interacting binary stellar systems, black holes; active galactic nuclei and relativistic jets.

2. Atomic and Laser Physics

The option includes the essential features of experimental techniques and important practical considerations in addition to theoretical concepts. A knowledge of atomic physics at the level of the A-papers is assumed e.g. Normal and Anomalous Zeeman effect.

The three subject areas within the option are each divided into two parts:

Atoms I: Atomic and molecular spectra and structure: Hydrogen and hydrogen-like systems, alkali atoms, helium and atoms with two electrons outside closed shells.Diatomic molecules. Selection rules and techniques of spectroscopy.

Lasers I: The theory of the laser with some important examples of gas and solid-state lasers: Einstein coefficients for the treatment of the interaction of radiation and atoms. Linewidths and lineshapes. Amplification by stimulated emission and the laser oscillator. Cavity effects. Gas lasers (He-Ne, He-Cd+ argon-ion and copper vapour). Solid state lasers (ruby and Nd:YAG).

Optics I: Diffraction and other phenomena related to lasers: Gaussian beams and their propagation. Cavity eigenfunctions. Thin films. Electro-optic effect. Second harmonic generation.

Atoms II: Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and manipulation of atoms. Homonuclear molecules. Hyperfine structure including effects of external magnetic fields. Optical pumping. Doppler-free laser spectroscopy. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and ions. Elementary treatment of quantum optics and the physical basis of quantum-electrodynamic effects in atoms.

Lasers II: Survey of laser systems: High power infrared molecular lasers. Lasers operating in the ultraviolet. Dye lasers. Semiconductor lasers. Diode pumped solid-state lasers. Use of lasers in chemical physics.

Optics II: Advanced optics: Fourier transforms. Coherence. Optical fibres. Holography. Nonlinear optics (third-order effects in atoms and molecules and their applications).

In the examination candidates will be expected to be able to answer questions on Atoms I, Lasers I and II and Optics I together with either Atoms II or Optics II.

3. Condensed Matter Physics

Crystal structures. Reciprocal lattices, Brillouin zones. Structure determination - X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction. Symmetry.

Acoustic and optic phonons: measurements of phonon dispersion. Anharmonicity: thermal properties. Structural phase changes.

Electrons in a periodic potential. Band gaps: electron dispersion: effective mass. Fermi surfaces. Semiconductors. Low dimensional structures.

Transport of heat and electrical current in metals and semiconductors. Landau quantisation. Effective mass renormalisation.

Interband optical transitions and excitons. Plasmons. Infra-red absorption/reflectivity and Raman scattering from phonons. Nonlinear optical properties. Applications.

Diamagnetism. Crystal field theory: paramagnetism. Magnetic ordering and phase transitions. Low dimensional magnetism. Spin waves. Magnetic resonance. Critical phenomena. Domains. Applications.

Bose condensation and superfluids. Conventional, organic and high Tc superconductors: thermodynamics, London and BCS theories. Josephson effects. Applications.

No more than one question may be set on experimental work performed as part of this subject.

4. Particle Physics

Experimental Techniques. Physics of accelerators. Colliders and fixed targets. Event rates and luminosity. Triggers and signal and background processes. Physics of particle detectors. Applications to real experiments. Wire chambers, silicon detectors, calorimeters and muon chambers. Quark Structure of Hadrons. Structure of hadrons. Deep inelastic scattering, the quark-parton model and QCD. Light hadron masses, magnetic moments and EM decays. Heavy quark states.

Theoretical Principles. Breit-Wigner resonance. Elementary introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Matrix elements. Discrete and continuous symmetries. Applications of gauge symmetries.

Applications to the Standard Model. Charged current (CC) weak interactions. V-A theory. Universality of CC. 2 and 4 component neutrino theory. Oscillations in the Ko and bb system. Discovery of the top quark. Electroweak symmetry breaking. The Z resonance and number of neutrino species.

5. Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans

Structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Atmospheric thermodynamics. Energy sources, sinks and transport. Cloud physics.

Fluid motions on a rotating planet. Scale analysis, hydrostatic and geostrophic balance. Inertio-gravity waves. Conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Vorticity, Rossby waves. Boundary layers. Boundary currents. Weather forecasting. Predictability and chaos.

The atmospheric radiation budget. Solar radiation. Radiative transfer. Radiative equilibrium. The Greenhouse Effect. Molecular spectra and line shapes.

Atmospheric chemistry, ozone. Catalytic cycles. The Ozone Hole.

Remote sounding of atmospheres. Absorption and emission spectroscopy. Techniques and data interpretation. Satellite and ground-based instrumentation. Current measurement programmes.

Climate and climate variability. Paleoclimates.

Physics and dynamics of planetary atmospheres.

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6. Theoretical Physics

Statistical physics: statistical mechanics of interacting systems, cooperative ordering, mean field theory, numerical approaches, scaling and criticality, renormalization group ideas. Stochastic processes, random walks, Brownian motion, Markov processes, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations.

Quantum mechanics: scattering theory for non-relativistic particles; relativistic quantum mechanics; many-particle systems; path-integral formulation.

Classical fields: covariant formulation of electrodynamics, gauge invariance, retarded potentials, dipole radiation. General Relativity, the equivalence principle, Einstein's equations, geodesics, perihelion of Mercury, simple applications to cosmology.

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One written paper of 1½ hours

The Syllabuses for this paper, topics A-G, are as published for the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics) Three Year Course Part B published in the Gazette (Ref No.4404 , Vol.126, page 1239 ). Candidates offering option 2 may not answer questions on topic B.

Candidates may replace the 1½ hour paper by an assessed course in a foreign language as specified in the regulations for the three year course.

Candidates may propose to the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Physics or deputy, not later than the first week of the Trinity full term of the academic year preceding that in which the examination is taken, another subject paper or papers to replace the written paper of 1½ hours.

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JOINT COMMITTEE FOR PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

HONOUR SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

Syllabuses for Part B of the Second Public Examination (Trinity Term 1998)

(a) One written paper of three hours chosen from the following Major Option subjects 1. to 6., and

(b) either: one written paper of one and a half hours from the Minor Option topics,

or: an essay or a project in Physics [subject to the proviso that no candidate may offer both an essay or project on Physics and Subject 199 in Philosophy].

(a) Major Options

Subject 1. Astrophysics

Stellar physics. Theory of stellar photospheres; continuous and absorption-line spectra; chromospheres and coronae; emission-line formation; physics of stellar interiors; structure of main-sequence stars; post-main-sequence evolution; degenerate stars; supernovae.

Normal galaxies. Kinematics of our own Galaxy, globular clusters; galaxy morphology and luminosity functions; mass estimates; groups and clusters of galaxies.

High-energy astrophysics: basic physics of interactions between high energy particles and radiation; interacting binary stellar systems, black holes; active galactic nuclei and relativistic jets.

Subject 2. Atomic and Laser Physics

The option includes the essential features of experimental techniques and important practical considerations in addition to theoretical concepts. A knowledge of atomic physics at the level of the A-papers is assumed e.g. Normal and Anomalous Zeeman effect.

The three subject areas within the option are each divided into two parts:

Atoms I: Atomic and molecular spectra and structure: Hydrogen and hydrogen-like systems, alkali atoms, helium and atoms with two electrons outside closed shells. Diatomic molecules. Selection rules and techniques of spectroscopy.

Lasers I: The theory of the laser with some important examples of gas and solid-state lasers: Einstein coefficients for the treatment of the interaction of radiation and atoms. Linewidths and lineshapes. Amplification by stimulated emission and the laser oscillator. Cavity effects. Gas lasers (He-Ne, He-Cd+ argon-ion and copper vapour). Solid state lasers (ruby and Nd:YAG).

Optics I: Diffraction and other phenomena related to lasers: Gaussian beams and their propagation. Cavity eigenfunctions. Thin films. Electro-optic effect. Second harmonic generation.

Atoms II: Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and manipulation of atoms. Homonuclear molecules. Hyperfine structure including effects of external magnetic fields. Optical pumping. Doppler-free laser spectroscopy. Laser cooling and trapping of atoms and ions. Elementary treatment of quantum optics and the physical basis of quantum-electrodynamic effects in atoms.

Lasers II: Survey of laser systems: High power infrared molecular lasers. Lasers operating in the ultraviolet. Dye lasers. Semiconductor lasers. Diode pumped solid-state lasers. Use of lasers in chemical physics.

Optics II: Advanced optics: Fourier transforms. Coherence. Optical fibres. Holography. Nonlinear optics (third-order effects in atoms and molecules and their applications).

In the examination candidates will be expected to be able to answer questions on Atoms I, Lasers I and II and Optics I together with either Atoms II or Optics II.

Subject 3. Condensed Matter Physics

Crystal structures. Reciprocal lattices, Brillouin zones. Structure determination - X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction. Symmetry.

Acoustic and optic phonons: measurements of phonon dispersion. Anharmonicity: thermal properties. Structural phase changes.

Electrons in a periodic potential. Band gaps: electron dispersion: effective mass. Fermi surfaces. Semiconductors. Low dimensional structures.

Transport of heat and electrical current in metals and semiconductors. Landau quantisation. Effective mass renormalisation.

Interband optical transitions and excitons. Plasmons. Infra-red absorption/reflectivity and Raman scattering from phonons. Nonlinear optical properties. Applications.

Diamagnetism. Crystal field theory: paramagnetism. Magnetic ordering and phase transitions. Low dimensional magnetism. Spin waves. Magnetic resonance. Critical phenomena. Domains. Applications.

Bose condensation and superfluids. Conventional, organic and high Tc superconductors: thermodynamics, London and BCS theories. Josephson effects. Applications.

No more than one question may be set on experimental work performed as part of this subject.

Subject 4. Particle Physics

Experimental Techniques. Physics of accelerators. Colliders and fixed targets. Event rates and luminosity. Triggers and signal and background processes. Physics of particle detectors. Applications to real experiments. Wire chambers, silicon detectors, calorimeters and muon chambers.

Quark Structure of Hadrons. Structure of hadrons. Deep inelastic scattering, the quark-parton model and QCD. Light hadron masses, magnetic moments and EM decays. Heavy quark states.

Theoretical Principles. Breit-Wigner resonance. Elementary introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. Matrix elements. Discrete and continuous symmetries. Applications of gauge symmetries.

Applications to the Standard Model. Charged current (CC) weak interactions. V-A theory. Universality of CC. 2 and 4 component neutrino theory. Oscillations in the Ko-K and bb system. Discovery of the top quark. Electroweak symmetry breaking. The Z resonance and number of neutrino species.

Subject 5. Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans

Structure and composition of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Atmospheric thermodynamics. Energy sources, sinks and transport. Cloud physics.

Fluid motions on a rotating planet. Scale analysis, hydrostatic and geostrophic balance. Inertio-gravity waves. Conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Vorticity, Rossby waves. Boundary layers. Boundary currents. Weather forecasting. Predictability and chaos.

The atmospheric radiation budget. Solar radiation. Radiative transfer. Radiative equilibrium. The Greenhouse Effect. Molecular spectra and line shapes. Atmospheric chemistry, ozone. Catalytic cycles. The Ozone Hole.

Remote sounding of atmospheres. Absorption and emission spectroscopy. Techniques and data interpretation. Satellite and ground-based instrumentation. Current measurement programmes.

Climate and climate variability. Paleoclimates.

Physics and dynamics of planetary atmospheres.

Subject 6. Theoretical Physics

Statistical physics: statistical mechanics of interacting systems, cooperative ordering, mean field theory, numerical approaches, scaling and criticality, renormalization group ideas. Stochastic processes, random walks, Brownian motion, Markov processes, Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations.

Quantum mechanics: scattering theory for non-relativistic particles; relativistic quantum mechanics; many-particle systems; path-integral formulation.

Classical fields: covariant formulation of electrodynamics, gauge invariance, retarded potentials, dipole radiation. General Relativity, the equivalence principle, Einstein's equations, geodesics, perihelion of Mercury, simple applications to cosmology.

Minor Options

For the written paper of one and a half hours, candidates will be required to answer two questions from any one section, each section being set on the following separate topics. Such background knowledge as is required for study of the topic will be assumed.

Topic A (Condensed Matter Physics)

Basic physics of transport and optical properties of semiconductors relevant to the operation of semiconductor devices. Principles of operation of bipolar and field effect devices. Semiconductor light emitters and detectors with applications in communication and information processing technology. Physics of low-dimensional structures with applications to electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Topic B (Atomic and Laser Physics)

Emission of optical radiation. Interaction of radiation and matter. Laser principles; inversion in gas and solid state laser systems. Optical cavities and eigenmodes. Time and frequency control of lasers.

Lasers in fundamental research.

Optical fibres and laser communication systems.

Medical, engineering and industrial applications of lasers.

Application of lasers to environmental monitoring.

Topic C (Applied Nuclear Physics)

Variations of isotopic abundances, their causes and measurement. Applications to dating and provenancing. Trace element analysis by proton induced X-ray emission and Rutherford back scattering. Interaction of radiation and matter. Application to radiation and particle detectors. Health Physics. The radiation environment. Cosmic rays. Nuclear fission. The Physics of fission reactors. Nuclear fusion. The Physics of fusion reactors including the Sun. Nucleosynthesis in the stars and the early Universe.

Topic D (Electronic circuits)

Analogue electronics: Low and high frequency characteristics of bipolar and field effect transistors. Linear amplifier design, negative feedback, compensation and stability. Non-linear and positive feedback circuits, mixers, oscillators. Noise and recovery of signals from noise.

Digital Electronics: Combinational logic and sequential logic. Programmable logic. Registers, data transfer, the microprocessor. Codes, error detection and correction. Sampling. Analogue to digital interface.

Topic E (Physics of fluid flows)

Fluids as continua; Navier-Stokes equations; conservation of mass. Poiseuille flow, Couette flow. Very viscous flows. Vorticity; inviscid, irrotational flows. Water waves. Nonlinear effects. Instability, turbulence.

Topic F (Astrophysics)

Introduction to cosmology. Observational constraints, expanding Universe, background radiation, primordial abundancies, mass density of the Universe, the Hot Big Bang model. The very early Universe, inflation, topological defects, evolution of irregularities, large scale structure of the Universe.

Topic G (Chaos)

Linear vs non-linear systems, phase plane, notions of stability. Parametric and forced oscillators, birfurcation to chaos. Iterative maps, universality. Static and dyanamic bifurcations. Simple and strange attractors. Poincare maps. Lyapunov exponents, fractals. Applications, fluid dynamics, semiconductors.

There may also be two computer experiments for Topic G and questions may be set on these.

Note:

(i) Candidates offering Subject 2 under (a) above may not answer questions on Topic B under (b) above.

(ii) The proposed nature of the essay or project under (b) above and its duration shall be submitted for approval to the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Physics or deputy with, in the case of a project, the agreement of the Chairman of Physics or deputy.

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 13 December.

1 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

(a) Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 29, l. 7, concerning the Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences, insert after regulation 3:

`4. Candidates are required to carry out fieldwork, as specified by the Sub-faculty of Biology, as an integral part of this course.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Biology (Integrative Bioscience)

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 714, ll. 30–1, after `3,000 words' insert `(excluding bibliography, tables, figures and appendices)', delete `specified by the organising committee', and substitute `agreed by the course organisers'.

2 Ibid., l. 38, after `bibliography' insert `, tables, figures'.

3 Ibid., l. 40, delete `a public oral presentation on a subject' and substitute `two public oral presentations on subjects', and in l. 41 delete `date' and substitute `dates'.

4 Ibid., l. 42, delete `organising committee' and substitute `examiners'.

5 Ibid., l. 47, delete `and the Programme organisers'.

6 Ibid., delete cl. 6 and substitute:

`The required written submissions must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, M.Sc. in Biology, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by 12 noon on the following dates:

The extended essays and practical notebooks relating to the first two subjects selected from the approved list must be submitted by Friday of Ninth Week of Hilary Term of the year in which the candidate is examined.

The dissertation on the first research project must be submitted by Friday of Noughth Week of Trinity Term of the year in which the candidate is examined.

The extended essays and practical notebooks relating to the second two subjects selected from the approved list must be submitted by the Second Friday of August in the year in which the candidate is examined.

The dissertation on the second research project must be submitted by the First Friday of September in the year in which the candidate is examined.

Each submission must be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work.'

7 Ibid., p. 715, delete cl. 9 and substitute:

`9. The examiners shall retain one copy of each extended essay and both copies of each dissertation of each successful candidate, the essays and one copy of each dissertation for deposit in the most appropriate departmental library and the other dissertation to be given to the project supervisor.'

8 Ibid., in Schedule, l. 18, after `four' insert `or more', delete `practical courses' and substitute `practicals, demonstrations'.

9 Ibid., l. 19, delete `and methodologies' and substitute `methodologies and results'.

10 Ibid., ll. 27–8, delete `providing comprehensive training in research skills in the three areas' and substitute `providing training in transferable core research skills in the following areas'. 11 Ibid., after l. 28 insert:

`(i) Safety and good research practice

(ii) Research Techniques'

and renumber.

12 Ibid., delete ll. 33–8 and substitute:

`To provide transferable personal skills for a career in scientific research, this programme will consist of taught classes with interactive discussions and practical assignments in the following areas:

(i) Creativity, teamwork, and leadership

(ii) Time management and learning skills

(iii) Presentation skills, verbal and written

(iv) Career planning, assessing personal skills and values, CVs and interview techniques

(v) Exploitation of science: getting ideas to the marketplace, patents, intellectual property rights

(vi) The relationship between academic and industrial research

(vii) Government science policy, research funding, grant applications.'

13 Ibid., l. 39, delete `Laboratory'.

14 Ibid., l. 40, delete `submit two laboratory research projects' and substitute `undertake two research projects'.

15 Ibid., l. 41, after `each', insert `involving original laboratory, museum, or field research'.

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2 Boards of the Faculties of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

Honour School of Engineering and Computing Science

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 188, delete ll. 13–20 and substitute:

`Candidates will be required to take three papers as follows: at least one of:

IE1, Information Engineering I

IE2, Information Engineering II

plus one or two papers chosen from a selection of those available for Section II of the Honour School of Computation. Specification of which Section II papers may be taken will be published in the University Gazette by the Standing Committee for Engineering and Computing Science two years in advance of the relevant examination. The subjects of papers IE1 and IE2 are specified in the appended schedule. The subjects of Section II shall be published in the University Gazette.

Performance in papers from Section II of the Honour School of Computation will be taken to include performance both in the written paper and any practical work associated with the papers. The examiners will consider all papers as having equal weight. Any practical work associated with papers from Section II of the Honour School of Computation must'.

2 Ibid., p. 188, l. 44, delete `and IE3'.

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3 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Master of Theology

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 963, ll. 14 and 23, and p. 965, l. 28, delete `Supervisory Committee' and substitute `Master of Theology Studies Committee'.

(b) Master of Theology in Applied Theology

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 965, after l. 25 insert:

`12. Science and Faith in the Modern World

Candidates will explore the methodology of science and theology; the development of science since the Enlightenment in the fields of physics, biology, and geology; the paradigm shifts in scientific understanding of creation, which have taken place in the twentieth century; and the contribution of biblical interpretation and natural theology to the doctrine of creation. Using the insights gained from pastoral experience and from an understanding of the doctrine of God candidates will study appropriate apologetic responses of the science–faith debate.'

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4 Committee for Educational Studies

Master of Science by Coursework

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 735, l. 29, delete `Teaching, Learning, and Teacher Development' and substitute `Teacher Education and Development'.

2 Ibid., p. 736, l. 3, delete `Teacher, Learning, and Teacher Development' and substitute `Teacher Education and Development'.

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5 Inter-faculty Committee for Latin American Studies

M.Phil. in Latin American Studies

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 600, after l. 4 insert:

`A candidate who fails the examination will be permitted to re-take it on one further occasion only, not later than one year after the attempt. Such a candidate whose dissertation has been of a satisfactory standard may re-submit the same piece of work, while a candidate who has reached a satisfactory standard on the written papers will not be required to retake that part of the examination.'

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

S. HAY, Green College: `An investigation of the utility of remote sensing imagery for predicting the distribution and abundance of the tsetse fly (Diptera: Glossinidae)'.
Department of Zoology, Tuesday, 3 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: P. Curran, T.R.E. Southwood.

Clinical Medicine

G.A. ROSS, Wolfson: `An investigation into the biological basis of lake effect end-points in the rectum of rats after irradiation'.
Department of Clinical Oncology, Churchill Hospital, Tuesday, 3 December, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: N.P. Rowell, J. Coggle.

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Literae Humaniores

E. FISCHER, St John's: `Dissolving problems of linguistic creativity'.
Trinity, Tuesday, 17 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: B.B. Rundle, C. Travis.

C. GREEN, Somerville: `Causation and the mind–body problem'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 6 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: T.W. Child, S. Clark.

P. TSELEKAS, St Cross: `The coinage of Acanthus'.
Corpus Christi, Monday, 16 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: N.K. Rutter, R.G. Osborne.

Mathematical Sciences

T. FIELD, New College: `The quantum complex structure'.
Mathematical Institute, Thursday, 12 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.C. Robinson, N.M.J. Woodhouse.

S. GALBRAITH, St Cross: `Equations for modular curves'.
Mathematical Institute, Monday, 9 December, 1 p.m.
Examiners: R.G.E. Pinch, A.F. Jarvis.

A.C. SIMPSON, St Hugh's: `Safety through security'.
Computing Laboratory, Wednesday, 4 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: J.W.M. Davies, J.E. Barnes.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

N.J. LUCKHURST, St John's: `Science and structure in Proust's À La Recherche'. 41 Wellington Square, Thursday, 12 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: E.J. Hughes, R.E. Goldthorpe.

D. PINFOLD, St Hugh's: `The child's view: a study of perspective in and after the Third Reich'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 18 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: K.J. Leeder, M. Butler.

Modern History

D.T. SUNDERLAND, Wolfson: `Agents and principals: the Crown Agents for the Colonies 1880–1914'.
Linacre, Friday, 13 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.W. Newbury, P.J. Cain.

Physical Sciences

M.N. ARMSTRONG, Lincoln: `Self-calibration from image sequences'.
Department of Engineering Science, Wednesday, 4 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R. Horaud, I. Reid.

A.P. BURDEN, Queen's: `Electron microscopy techniques to further the understanding of conductive polymer composites'.
Department of Materials, Wednesday, 18 December, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Fryer, M.J. Goringe.

P.J. CLARKE, Exeter: `Tectonic motions and earthquake deformation in Greece from GPS measurements'.
Department of Earth Sciences, Friday, 6 December, 1.30 p.m.
Examiners: S. Das, G. Blewitt.

KIN YIP, St John's: `Calibration of the LEP collision energy during the 1995 Zo resonance scan and measurement of the inclusive leptonic decays of the Zo with the Delphi detector'.
Nuclear and Astrophysics Laboratory, Friday, 29 November, 1.30 p.m.
Examiners: C.M. Buttar, R.C.E. Devenish.

Physiological Sciences

S. CRAGG, Lincoln: `Electrochemical studies of somatodladritic dopamial release in mid-brain'.
New Chemistry Building, Thursday, 19 December, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: V. Leviel, M. Fillenz.

K. TARCZY-HORNOCH, Green College: `Physiology of synaptic inputs to layer IV of cat visual cortex'.
St John's, Friday, 20 December, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: A.M. Sillito, A.J. Parker.

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Social Studies

C. LABORDE, St Antony's: `State, groups, and individuals. Pluralist thinking in Britain and France, 1900–25'.
Social Studies Faculty Centre, Monday, 2 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.W. Burrow, J. Jennings.

C. LAKE, Nuffield: `Egalitarianism and responsibility'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 18 December, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R. Plant, J. Horton.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Mathematical Sciences

M. UDDIN, St Anne's: `Multivariate density estimation by projection pursuit methods'.
Department of Statistics, Monday, 2 December, 2 p.m.
Examiners: I.G. Vlachonikolis, R.W. Hiorns.

Physical Sciences

J. BERG, St Catherine's: `The nonlinear dynamics of intermittent–contact mode atomic force microscopy'.
Department of Materials, Tuesday, 3 December, 11.15 a.m.
Examiners: A.C. Skeldon, J.B. Pethica.

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