Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Election of one Official Member and one Ordinary Member

An election will be held on Thursday, 24 July to fill vacancies for an official member (vice Professor S.K. Donaldson, resigned), and one ordinary member (vice Dr M.J. Collins, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1998.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 30 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 15 July.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

M.Sc. in Biology (Integrative Bioscience)

The approved subjects for which courses will be offered in 1997–8 for the Research in the Biosciences component of the M.Sc. in Biology (Integrative Bioscience) are as follows:

Research in Animal Behaviour
Research in Cell and Developmental Biology
Research in Ecology and Conservation of Biodiversity
Research in Mathematical Biology
Research in Ornithology

With effect from 1 October 1997, candidates will be required to submit practical notebooks for all the courses and to show advanced knowledge of three of the approved subjects, by submitting three extended essays on topics approved by the course organisers, in addition to submission of a practical notebook and an extended essay relating to the Techniques of Molecular Biology course.

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M.Sc. in Biology (Integrative Bioscience), 1997–8: dates for written submissions

With effect from 1 October 1997, the regulations for the above course provide that the written submissions required of candidates must be submitted by dates to be specified by the Organising Committee and published in the University Gazette not later than the start of the Michaelmas Term of the academic year in which the examination is taken.

For 1997–8 the Organising Committee has approved the following submission dates:

Two copies of the essay relating to the Techniques in Molecular Biology course and the practical notebooks relating to the Techniques in Molecular Biology Course and the first of the Research in the Biosciences courses must be submitted by 12 noon on Friday, 9 January 1998.

Two copies of the second essay and the practical notebooks relating to the second and third of the Research in the Biosciences courses must be submitted by 12 noon on Friday, 3 April 1998.

Two copies of the dissertation on the first research project must be submitted by 12 noon on Friday, 24 April 1998.

The practical notebooks relating to the fourth and fifth of the Research in the Biosciences courses must be submitted by 12 noon on Friday, 10 July 1998.

Two copies each of the third and fourth essays must be submitted by 12 noon on Friday, 21 August 1998.

Two copies of the dissertation on the second research project must be submitted by 12 noon on Friday, 11 September 1998.

Each submission must be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that it is the candidate's own work, except where specifically acknowledged.

The submissions must be sent to the Chairman of Examiners, M.Sc. in Biology, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1999

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved the following paper for examination in Section o of the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1999 (see Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 290, regulation 3 (e)).

Paper o12: Mathematics Education

This course is a study of the processes and practices in learning and teaching mathematics and of associated issues. It will be of value to undergraduates in developing their awareness of processes and issues in mathematical learning and understanding beneficial to their own learning of mathematics. It will also serve as an introduction to mathematics education as a discipline, and provide insights for those who are interested to become future teachers of mathematics. The course will have three strands:

1 Doing, thinking, and understanding mathematics: this involves reflection on processes and strategies which are a part of mathematical learning. What is mathematics? will be overtly addressed as will theories of learning and learning difficulties. Links will be made with undergraduates' own learning of mathematics.

2 Teaching mathematics and its relationship to issues in learning: being an able mathematician is not, by itself, sufficient to guarantee being an effective teacher of mathematics, nor an effective unsupported learner of further mathematics. Mathematical pedagogy will be introduced through an analysis of mathematical topics and the needs of learners in coming to understand these topics. We shall draw on research into the learning and teaching of mathematics at all levels.

3 Wider issues in the learning and teaching of mathematics: this strand will explore a range of issues in mathematics education: for example social and cultural issues and the roles of technology.

Outline of topics to be covered:

Mathematical Thinking: the nature of mathematics; the process of mathematics; convincing and proving; conjecturing; advanced mathematical thinking.
Mathematical Understanding: mathematics and language; visualisation and imagery; children and number; strategies and errors.
Psychology of Learning Mathematics: relational and instrumental understandings; understanding, learning, and knowing; constructivism.
Research in Mathematics Teaching: teaching styles and interactive strategies; constructions of teaching; assessment.
Sociology of Mathematics Teaching: social constructivism and situated cognition; gender, culture, and social class.
Organisation of Mathematics Teaching and Learning: school curricula; classroom learning.

The examination will consist of a three-hour paper with three essay-type questions each relating to one of the strands of the course. Preparation for two of these questions will be done in advance.

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M.Sc. in Geometry, Mathematical Physics, and Analysis

The following additional courses for Schedule 1 have been approved by the Standing Committee for examination in 1998:

Algebraic Topology
Further Quantum Theory
General Relativity I
General Relativity II
Quantum Field Theory

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M.Sc. in Mathematics and the Foundations of Computer Science

The Standing Committee gives notice that the list of lecture courses for 1997–8 is as follows:

Section A: Algebra, Logic and General Topology

Schedule I

Model Theory
Group Theory
Lie Algebras
Elementary Number Theory
Lattice Theory
Analytic Topology
Representation Theory

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Schedule II

Algebraic Number Theory
General Topology
Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems

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Section B: Foundations of Computer Science

Schedule I

Lambda Calculus
Domain Theory
Parallel Algorithms

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Schedule II

Game Semantics
Unifying Theories of Computation

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Section C: Experimental and Discrete Mathematics

Schedule I

Applied Probability
Complexity and Cryptography
Communication Theory
Combinatorial Optimisation

Schedule II

Randomised Algorithms
Computational Algebra
Computational Number Theory

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BOARDS OF THE FACULTIES OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

M.Sc. in Neuroscience

The approved courses available in 1997–8 for the specialist neuroscience component of the M.Sc. in Neuroscience are listed below. Candidates will be required take five courses, choosing at least one under each of the three series A, B, and C.

Module A1: Cellular signalling

Organisers: Dr J.J.B. Jack and Dr A.U. Larkman.

Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Structure and function of membranes
Varieties of ion channels
Synaptic transmission
Synaptic modifiability

Module A2: Techniques for monitoring and analysing neuronal circuits

Organiser: Dr A.J. King.

Fourteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Recording and monitoring neuronal activity
Direct manipulation of the brain
Cortical microcircuitry
Field potentials in health and disease

Module A3: Imaging and mapping techniques

Organiser: Dr R.E. Passingham.

Fourteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Neuroanatomical techniques
Techniques for functional localisation
Structural imaging
Functional imaging

Module B1: Sensory systems

Organiser: Dr D.R. Moore.

Twelve lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Sensory systems analysis
Sensory psychophysics
Artificial vision

Module B2: Clinical aspects of neuroscience

Organiser: Dr J.N.P. Rawlins.

Eighteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

The development and application of animal models
Consciousness and cognition
Non-affective neurological disorders

Module B3: Neurocomputing and neural networks

Organiser: Dr E.T. Rolls.

Eleven lectures and associated practicals.

Neurocomputing
Connectionist approaches to cognitive function: two-day workshop

Module C1: CNS development

Organiser: Dr J.S.H. Taylor.

Eight lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Early development
Formation of a nervous system
Development of sense organs

Module C2: Neuronal plasticity

Organiser: Dr J.S.H. Taylor.

Fifteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Axonal growth
Establishing connections between neuronal populations
The modifiability of the brain

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SUB-FACULTY OF PHYSICS

HONOUR SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE (PHYSICS)

In accordance with the regulations for the Honour School of Natural Science (Physics) the following syllabuses and notes are published by the Sub-faculty of Physics.

Candidates shall submit their practical accounts and daybooks to the Chairman of the Examiners of the Final Honour School of Natural Science (Physics), or deputy, at the Department of Physics, not later than noon on Friday of Week 3 of Hilary Term 1999.

Syllabuses for Part A of the Second Public Examination of the three- and four-year courses (Hilary Term 1999)

Five written papers on the fundamental principles of Physics.

General

Candidates will be expected to possess a general understanding of the macroscopic behaviour and phenomenological description of the properties of matter in bulk and to have such knowledge of chemistry and mathematics as is required to study the subjects of the examination.

Apart from the mathematical questions on sects. (5a) and (5b) emphasis in the papers on the Fundamental Principles of Physics will be placed on testing the candidates' conceptual and experimental understanding of the subjects.

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A1. Thermal Physics

Kinetic theory of gases. Mean free path and application to viscosity and thermal conductivity. (Low pressure phenomena are excluded.)

Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose Einstein distributions with simple applications. Black body radiation. Partition function and its relation to thermodynamic functions; application to the rotational and vibrational contributions to the heat capacity of diatomic gases.

Thermal waves in solids and thermal conductivity as a boundary value problem in one space dimension.

First and second laws of thermodynamics. Equations of state, thermodynamic properties of pure substances. Thermodynamic functions, their significance and use. First-order phase changes.

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A2. Electromagnetism and optics

Electric and magnetic fields and their relation to charges and currents. The motion of particles in electric and magnetic fields. Fields in isotropic dielectric and magnetic media. Electric and magnetic energy density. Maxwell's equations. Plane electromagnetic waves in extended media. Poynting vector and radiation pressure. Reflection and transmission at plane interfaces between dielectrics for normal and oblique incidence. Skin depth. Loss- less transmission lines. Simple classic harmonic oscillator theory of dispersion, absorption and scattering.

Fraunhofer diffraction and interference by wavefront division. Telescopes, microscopes, grating spectrometers, resolution limits, Abbé theory (qualitative). Two beam interference and applications of the Michelson interferometer. Multiple beam interference and the Fabry-Perot etalon. Polarization and the optics of uniaxial crystals.

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A3. Quantum mechanics and atomic physics

Schrödinger equation for one particle; plane waves; reflection and transmission of plane waves at potential barriers in one dimension. Solution for the harmonic oscillator in one dimension. Solution for the cubical box. Central potentials; orbital angular momentum and parity; form of solutions for the bound states in a Coulomb potential. Postulates of quantum mechanics; operators; eigenvalues; expectation values and measurements. First order time-independent non-degenerate perturbation theory. The concept of good quantum numbers. The formula for transition probabilities.

Particle and wave properties of photons and matter. Simple treatment of atomic spectra, fine structure, Zeeman effect. Selection rules for electric dipole radiation. Periodic table. X-ray spectra in emission and absorption. Einstein A and B coefficients. Simple treatment of the hyperfine structure of atoms in the absence of external fields.

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A4. Condensed matter and electronics

Simple ideas of crystalline structure; X-ray determination of lattice constant for cubic structures. Interatomic forces, lattic vibrations, Einstein and Debye heat capacities of solids. Elementary treatment of electrical resistivity and of heat conduction by electrons in metals. Free electron theory of metals, simple ideas of electron energy band structure in one dimension. Elementary properties of intrinsic and impurity semiconductors, concepts of holes and effective mass. Application to elementary treatment of semiconductor junctions.

Magnetic properties of solids including paramagnetism and mean field theory of ferromagnetism. Simple ideas of superconductivity. Elementary treatment of magnetic resonance phenomena.

The dc and small signal analysis of circuits containing junction diodes and one or two bipolar transistors. (High frequency effects in semiconductor devices are excluded.) Ideal operational amplifiers and their use with negative feedback in linear amplifiers, integrators, differentiators and summing circuits. Use of ideal operational amplifiers with positive feedback in oscillator and Schmitt trigger circuits.

Truth tables and Boolean algebra. Design of simple combinational logic circuits using ideal gates. The properties of ideal S-R, D-type and J-K flip-flops. Analysis of simple sequential circuits including counter and shift register circuits.

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A5. Special relativity, sub-atomic physics, mathematics

Experimental basis for the special theory of relativity. The Lorentz transformation and its use in elementary problems in mechanics and optics. Proper time and the relativistic expressions for energy and momentum; the transformation of energy and momentum. Energy and momentum for systems of particles in the centre of mass and other frames; invariant mass. The application of conservation laws and invariants to simple problems in mechanics and optics.

The semi-empirical mass formula and nuclear stability. Radioactivity; simple applications. The single-particle shell model; spin and parity. Cross sections and qualitative treatment of resonances. The basic elements of energy generation in fission reactors and stars. The interaction of charged particles and photons with matter: ionisation energy loss, the Compton and photoelectric effect, pair-production and bremmstrahlung; the basic methods used in the detection of particles and radiation. Elementary properties of hadrons and leptons; the production and decay of particles; quark flow diagrams. The quark model; spin, parity and charge of hadrons; the quark flavours; heavy quark-antiquark systems. The fundamental interactions; concept of virtual particle exchange; conservation laws and coupling constants. Simple theory of Fermi beta decay and simple applications to particle and nuclear beta decay; effects of kinematics on decay rates. Parity violation in weak interactions. The W and Z bosons.

Mathematics

(a) Matrices and linear transformations, including translations and rotations in three dimensions and Lorentz transformations in four dimensions. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of real symmetric matrices and of Hermitian matrices. Diagonalization of real symmetric matrices with distinct eigenvalues.

(b) Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of second-order linear ordinary differential equations of the Sturm-Liouville type; simple examples of orthogonality of eigenfunctions belonging to different eigenvalues; simple eigenfunction expansions. The method of separation of variables in linear partial differential equations in three and four variables. Use of Cartesian, spherical polar and cylindrical polar coordinates (proofs of the form of [inverse delta squared] will not be required). Elementary treatment of series solutions of linear, homogeneous second order differential equations, including solutions which terminate as a finite polynomial. (Formal questions of convergence are excluded, as is the method of Frobenius for obtaining a second solution containing a logarithmic function in the case in which the roots of the indicial equation differ by an integer.)

(c) Simple physical applications of the following topics. (The physics will be restricted to topics occurring elsewhere in the syllabus.) Wave packets, phase and group velocity; the bandwidth theorems and uncertainty relations; the formulae for the Fourier transform and its inverse and for Fourier sine and cosine transforms and their inverses. Convolution. (All transforms are restricted to one dimension only. The use of transforms in solving ordinary and partial differential equations and the use of contour integration are excluded.)

One question may be set on each of the mathematical topics of sects. (5a) and (5b) and incidental use may be required on any paper of the material of sect. (5c).

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Theoretical Physics

Section A: Classical Mechanics
The calculus of variations and Hamilton's principle. Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations with simple applications to systems with a few degrees of freedom. Normal modes from Lagrangians. Symmetries and conservation laws; generators and Poisson brackets. The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian for a point particle in an external electromagnetic field.
Section B: Quantum mechanics
State vectors, bra and ket notation. Quantum mechanics of finite state systems. First and second order time-independent perturbation theory including the degenerate case. First- order time-dependent perturbation theory. Hamiltonian for a non relativistic particle in an external electromagnetic field. Operator methods for the simple harmonic oscillator and for angular momentum. Matrix representation of angular momentum, including in particular the Pauli spin matrix formalism for spin-½ particles. Wave functions for two identical particles of spin-0, and of spin-½.
Section C: Statistical mechanics
The microcanonical, canonical and grand canonical ensembles. Fermi-Dirac and Bose- Einstein statistics. Bose-Einstein condensation. Fluctuations. The one-dimensional Ising model.

An equal number of questions will be set on each of the sections, A, B and C. Candidates replacing four days of practical work will be required to answer two questions in one and a half hours. Candidates replacing eight days of practical work will be required to answer four questions from at least two sections in three hours.

At the time of entering the examination candidates intending to offer a paper on theoretical physics must give notice of their intention and must state whether that paper will replace four or eight days of practical work.

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Syllabuses for Part B of the Second Public Examination of the three-year course(Trinity Term 1999)

The extended essay or account of practical work must be submitted by noon on Friday of Week 5 of Trinity Term 1999, addressed to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, for the Chairman of the Examiners of the Final Honour School of Natural Science (Physics). One written paper of one and a half hours.

Candidates will be required to answer two questions from any one section, each section being set on the following separate topics. Such background knowledge as is required for the study of the topic will be assumed.

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Topic A (Optoelectronics and Semi-conductor Devices)

Basic physics of transport and optical properties of semiconductors relevant to the operation of semiconductor devices. Principles of operation of bipolar and field effect devices. Semiconductor light emitters and detectors with applications in communication and information processing technology. Physics of low-dimensional structures with applications to electronic and optoelectronic devices.

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Topic B (Lasers and Applications)

Emission of optical radiation. Interaction of radiation and matter. Laser principles; inversion in gas and solid state laser systems. Optical cavities and eigenmodes. Time and frequency control of lasers.

Lasers in fundamental research.

Optical fibres and laser communication systems.

Medical, engineering and industrial applications of lasers.

Application of lasers to environmental monitoring.

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Topic C (Applied Nuclear Physics)

Uses of nuclear physics in modern society, including medicine, the environment, nuclear weapons, power generation and the analysis and dating of materials. Interactions of charged and neutral radiation with matter, radiation detectors. Medical diagnostic imaging, tomography, therapy. Nuclear safety and the radiation environment. Other uses. Nuclear accidents, waste and weapons. Elements of surveillance of weapon production. Nuclear physics analysis methods and applications. (i) radioactive dating, (ii) accelerator mass spectrometry, (iii) neutron activation analysis (NAA), (iv) scanning proton microprobe (SPM). Fission reactors: physics, history, design, accidents. Fusion reactors: comparison of physics of stars, reactors and bombs.

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Topic D (Electronic circuits)

Analogue electronics: Low and high frequency characteristics of bipolar and field effect transistors. Linear amplifier design, negative feedback, compensation and stability. Non- linear and positive feedback circuits, mixers, oscillators. Noise and recovery of signals from noise.

Digital Electronics: Combinational logic and sequential logic. Programmable logic. Registers, data transfer, the microprocessor. Codes, error detection and correction. Sampling. Analogue to digital interface.

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Topic E (Physics of fluid flows)

Fluids as continua; Navier-Stokes equations; conservation of mass. Poiseuille flow, Couette flow. Very viscous flows. Vorticity; inviscid, irrotational flows. Water waves. Nonlinear effects. Instability, turbulence.

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Topic F (Observational Cosmology)

Introduction to cosmology. Observational constraints, expanding Universe, background radiation, primordial abundancies, mass density of the Universe, the Hot Big Bang model. The very early Universe, inflation, topological defects, evolution of irregularities, large scale structure of the Universe.

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Topic G (Chaos)

Linear v. non-linear systems, phase plane, notions of stability. Parametric and forced oscillators, birfurcation to chaos. Iterative maps, universality. Static and dyanamic bifurcations. Simple and strange attractors. Poincare maps. Lyapunov exponents, fractals. Applications, fluid dynamics, semiconductors.

Topic H (Biophysics)

An introduction to biological molecules: types of bonds; covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds, Van der Waal bonding, the hydrophobic bond. Protein structure; amino acid types, polypeptides, alpha-helices, beta sheets, secondary and tertiary protein structure, protein structure and its relation to function. Membrane structure; lipids, lipid phases, liposomes, membrane proteins. DNA structure; sugars, purines, pyrimidines, base pairing, replication. Introduction to molecular biology; storage, transmission and expression of genetic information.

Ions and electrical signalling in biology: properties of ions in solution; sizes, charges, hydration, mobility and diffusion, counterions and Debye screening, the proton as an ion, pK and pH. Charged membranes; Debye layer, the membrane as an ion barrier. Ion channels; counterports and pumps; structures of channels. Signal transmission; simple explanation of the action potential in nerve.

Physical techniques: x-ray diffraction including a case study of a protein structure; magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging of living systems; new types of scanning microscopy to directly image molecules.

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JOINT COMMITTEE FOR PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

In accordance with the regulations for the Honour School of Physics and Philosophy the following syllabuses are published by the Joint Committee for Physics and Philosophy.

HONOUR SCHOOL OF PHYSICS AND PHILOSOPHY

Syllabuses for Part A of the Second Public Examination (Hilary Term 1999)

One three-hour written paper in theoretical physics and two written papers on the fundamental principles of physics.

General

Candidates will be expected to possess a general understanding of the macroscopic behaviour and phenomenological description of the properties of matter in bulk and to have such knowledge of chemistry and mathematics as is required to study the subjects of the examination.

Apart from the mathematical questions on sects. (iii.a) and (iii.b) emphasis in the papers on the Fundamental Principles of Physics will be placed on testing the candidates' conceptual and experimental understanding of the subjects.

(i) Theoretical Physics

Section A: Classical Mechanics

The calculus of variations and Hamilton's principle. Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations with simple applications to systems with a few degrees of freedom. Normal modes from Lagrangians. Symmetries and conservation laws; generators and Poisson brackets. The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian for a point particle in an external electromagnetic field.

Section B: Quantum mechanics

State vectors, bra and ket notation. Quantum mechanics of finite state systems. First and second order time-independent perturbation theory including the degenerate case. First- order time-dependent perturbation theory. Hamiltonian for a non relativistic particle in an external electromagnetic field. Operator methods for the simple harmonic oscillator and for angular momentum. Matrix representation of angular momentum, including in particular the Pauli spin matrix formalism for spin-½ particles. Wave functions for two identical particles of spin-0, and of spin-½.

Four questions will be set on each of the Sections, A and B. Candidates will be required to answer four questions not all from one of the sections labelled A, B.

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(ii) Fundamental Principles I: Quantum mechanics and atomic physics

Schrödinger equation for one particle; plane waves; reflection and transmission of plane waves at potential barriers in one dimension. Solution for the harmonic oscillator in one dimension. Solution for the cubical box. Central potentials; orbital angular momentum and parity; form of solutions for the bound states in a Coulomb potential. Postulates of quantum mechanics; operators; eigenvalues; expectation values and measurements. First order time-independent non-degenerate perturbation theory. The concept of good quantum numbers. The formula for transition probabilities.

Particle and wave properties of photons and matter. Simple treatment of atomic spectra, fine structure, Zeeman effect. Selection rules for electric dipole radiation. Periodic table. X-ray spectra in emission and absorption. Einstein A and B coefficients. Simple treatment of the hyperfine structure of atoms in the absence of external fields.

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(iii) Fundamental Principles II: Special relativity, sub-atomic physics, mathematics

Experimental basis for the special theory of relativity. The Lorentz transformation and its use in elementary problems in mechanics and optics. Proper time and the relativistic expressions for energy and momentum; the transformation of energy and momentum. Energy and momentum for systems of particles in the centre of mass and other frames; invariant mass. The application of conservation laws and invariants to simple problems in mechanics and optics.

The semi-empirical mass formula and nuclear stability. Radioactivity; simple applications. The single-particle shell model; spin and parity. Cross sections and qualitative treatment of resonances. The basic elements of energy generation in fission reactors and stars. The interaction of radiation with matter and the basic methods used in the detection of particles and radiation. Elementary properties of hadrons and leptons; the production and decay of particles. The quark model; spin, parity and charge of hadrons; the quark flavours; charmonium. The fundamental interactions; concept of virtual particle exchange; selection rules and coupling constants. Simple theory of Fermi beta decay and simple applications to particle and nuclear beta decay; effects of kinematics on decay rates. Parity violation in weak interactions. The W and Z bosons.

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Mathematics

(a) Matrices and linear transformations, including translations and rotations in three dimensions and Lorentz transformations in four dimensions. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of real symmetric matrices and of Hermitian matrices. Diagonalization of real symmetric matrices with distinct eigenvalues.

(b) Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of second-order linear ordinary differential equations of the Sturm-Liouville type; simple examples of orthogonality of eigenfunctions belonging to different eigenvalues; simple eigenfunction expansions. The method of separation of variables in linear partial differential equations in three and four variables. Use of Cartesian, spherical polar and cylindrical polar co-ordinates (proofs of the form of [inverse delta squared] will not be required). Elementary treatment of series solutions of linear, homogeneous second order differential equations, including solutions which terminate as a finite polynomial. (Formal questions of convergence are excluded, as is the method of Frobenius for obtaining a second solution containing a logarithmic function in the case in which the roots of the indicial equation differ by an integer.)

(c) Simple physical applications of the following topics. (The physics will be restricted to topics occurring elsewhere in the syllabus.) Wave packets, phase and group velocity; the bandwidth theorems and uncertainty relations; the formulae for the Fourier transform and its inverse and for Fourier sine and cosine transforms and their inverses. Convolution. (All transforms are restricted to one dimension only. The use of transforms in solving ordinary and partial differential equations and the use of contour integration are excluded.)

One question may be set on each of the mathematical topics of sects. (iii.a) and (iii.b) and incidental use may be required on any paper of the material of sect. (iii.c).

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STANDING COMMITTEE FOR THE M.SC. IN COMPUTATION

In accordance with examination regulations for the M.Sc. in Computation (Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 727), the Standing Committee for the Degree of M.Sc. in Computation gives notice that the list of options for examination in 1998 will be:

Section A

Mathematics for Software Engineering
Introduction to Imperative Programming
Introduction to Concurrency
Introduction to Functional Programming
Introduction to Numerical Computation
Introduction to Architecture

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Section B

Software specification and design
Specification Methods
Requirements Engineering
Object-Oriented Programming
Parallel Scientific Computation or Scalable Parallel Algorithms
Advanced Concurrency Tools
Machine-assisted Software Engineering
Operating Systems
Compilers
Theorem Proving
Application-oriented Program Semantics
Critical Systems Engineering
Advanced Software Development
Architecture
Software Testing

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee on Continuing Education will come into effect on 3 July.

1 Board of the Faculty of English Language and

Literature

M.St. in Research Methods in English

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 686, l. 29, delete `(iii) Modern Icelandic' and substitute: `(iii) Old Norse Philology'.


2 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

M.Phil. in Mathematics for Industry

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 604, after l. 47 insert:

`6. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'


3 Committee on Continuing Education

Postgraduate Diploma in European Studies

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, delete from l. 37 on p. 910 to l. 24 on p. 911 and insert:

`(b) The course will consist of four subjects as follows:

(i) Postwar European History and Politics

The reconstruction of European politics after 1945; the growth of the welfare state and mixed economy; West European party systems and liberal democratic party government; changing relationships between government, business, and labour (from neo-corporatism to structured pluralism; from state intervention and nationalisation to marketisation and privatisation); the restoration of democracy in Southern European societies; the liberalisation of Eastern European regimes and their transitions to liberal democracy and mixed economy.

(ii) European Economic Integration

The process of economic integration in Europe; introduction to the theory of preferential trading arrangements; major policy areas: the budget, the CAP and external trade policy; the economies of the Single European Act; monetary integration: early attempts, the EMS, the Maastricht plan and its aftermath; transition economics and economic aspects of the integration of Central and Eastern Europe with the EU.

(iii) EC Institutions and Law

The development and operation of the institutions of the European Communities; policy-making within the European Communities; the impact of European institutions and policies on national systems of government; legal aspects of the integration process, including implementation and enforcement; the European Union and its relations with European non-member states; the European Union and Japan; trade adjudication and political relationships; the European Union and other East Asian economies.

(iv) The International Relations of Europe

The impact of super-power relations on Europe and the role of Europe in defining these super-power relations; the origins and development of European integration in its economic, military, and ideological aspects; the role of the USA in fashioning Western European developments; the evolution of the Franco-German relationship; the collapse of Communism and its consequences for Eastern and Western Europe.'

2 Ibid., p. 911, delete ll. 25–31.

3 Ibid., l. 35, delete `diploma'.

4 Ibid., l. 36, after `examiners' insert `c/o Registry,'.

5 Ibid., l. 37, delete `Michaelmas' and substitute `Hilary'.

6 Ibid., l. 38, after `his' insert `or her'.

7 Ibid., l. 40, after `his' insert `or her'.

8 Ibid., l. 41, delete `Two' and substitute `Not more than two'.

9 Ibid., delete ll. 42–9 and substitute: `Continuous assessment by persons appointed by the board of studies. The final assessment will be based on at least one exercise in each of the four subjects to be submitted by noon on Friday of the third week in Trinity Term of the second year of study.'

10 Ibid., after l. 50 insert: `The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Diploma.'

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF DIVINITY

The Board of the Faculty of Theology has granted leave to D.G. ROWELL, Keble, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Divinity.

A list of evidence submitted by the candidate is available at the University Offices.

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine has granted leave to J.M. REYNARD, Lady Margaret Hall, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.

The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `The assessment and significance of lower urinary tract symptoms in men with benign prostatic enlargement—a reappraisal'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Anthropology and Geography

S. SCHMITT, Green College: `Disturbance and succession on the Krakatau Islands, Indonesia'.
School of Geography, Monday, 23 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: H.A. Viles, M.D. Swaine.

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English Language and Literature

D.J. CHANDLER, Corpus Christi: `Norwich literature 1788– 97: a critical survey'.
Balliol, Friday, 27 June, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: G. Kelly, R.H. Lonsdale.

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Literae Humaniores

A. DAVIES, St John's: `The role of inscribed monuments in transforming public space at Pompeii and Ostia'.
Christ Church, Wednesday, 23 July, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: A.K. Bowman, J.R. Patterson.

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Mathematical Sciences

L.W.J. LANEROLLE, Balliol: `Numerical modelling of turbulent compressible flow'.
Computing Laboratory, Monday, 30 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: D.F. Mayers, L. Lapworth.

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Medieval and Modern Languages

A.K. MARGALIOTH, Magdalen: `Yiddish periodicals published by displaced persons, 1946–9'.
St John's, Friday, 4 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: L.I. Yudkin, R.N.N. Robertson.

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Modern History

M. YATES, Harris Manchester: `Continuity and change in rural society c.1400–1600: West Hanney and Shaw (Berkshire) and their region'.
Examination Schools, Tuesday, 24 June, 10 a.m.
Examiners: R.R. Davies, R.H. Britnell.

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Physical Sciences

D.A. FLETCHER, New College: `Internal cooling of turbine blades: the matrix cooling method'.
Department of Engineering Science, Monday, 23 June, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: D. Lampard, C.J. Wood.

O.W. KINGSBURY, St John's: `The inhibition of cysteine proteinases'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Monday, 23 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.M. Campbell, C.J. Schofield.

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Physiological Sciences

S. BETMOUNI, Linacre: `Inflammatory responses in a mouse model of scrapie'.
St Hugh's, Monday, 14 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: I. McConnell, M.M Esiri.

C. CARDY, Lincoln: `The structure and function of calcium binding epidermal growth factor-like domains in human fibrillin-1'.
Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tuesday, 15 July, 11 a.m.
Examiners: B.C. Sykes, M. Grant.

Social Studies

M.L. BEEMAN, St Antony's: `Public policy and economic competition in Japan: the rise of anti-monopoly policy, 1973–95'.
Nissan Institute, Wednesday, 25 June, 11 a.m.
Examiners: J.M. Corbett, S. Wilks.

B.W. SETSER, University: `Slaying sacred cows: sources of policy change in United States/European Union negotiations over agricultural policy and audiovisual services'.
Nuffield, Tuesday, 8 July, 2 p.m.
Examiners: A.J. Hurrell, M. Smith.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Mathematical Sciences

J. COLLIER, University: `Spatial and propagating patterns in embryology'.
Mathematical Institute, Thursday, 26 June, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.A. Sherratt, N.A.M. Monk.