Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1997

Honour Moderations

Geography: S. STOKES, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's (address: School of Geography)

Mathematics and Computation: O. DE MOOR, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen

Physics and Philosophy: D.H. RICE, B.PHIL., MA, Student of Christ Church

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Honour Schools

Ancient and Modern History: G.D. WOOLF, MA, Fellow of Brasenose

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: G.B. HENNING, MA, Fellow of St Catherine's (address: Department of Experimental Psychology)

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Master of Studies

Celtic Studies: T.M.O. CHARLES-EDWARDS, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi

Modern Jewish Studies: G. ABRAMSON, MA, Fellow of St Cross (address: Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies)

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Probationer Research Student

Qualifying Examination in Economics: S. ANAND, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Catherine's

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APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINER PRO HAC VICE

The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have appointed D. HOPWOOD, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of St Antony's College, as an examiner for Modern Middle Eastern Studies in the Qualifying Examination for Subject (iv) Modern Middle Eastern Studies of the M.Phil. Examination in Oriental Studies to be held in Hilary Term 1997 pro hac vice (vice Dr E.L. Rogan, granted leave of absence).

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties will come into effect on 21 March.

1 Board of the Faculty of English Language and Literature

M.Phil. in English Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination decrees, 1996, p. 570, delete ll. 30–3 and substitute:

`4. Eddaic and Skaldic Verse. The following texts are prescribed: Gudrúnarkvidur I–III, Grottasöngr, Vafthrúdnismál, Baldrs draumar, Ragnarsdrápa (Bragi), Haraldskvaedi (Worbjörn hornklofi), Hákonarmál (Eyvindr), Vellekla (Einarr Skálaglamm), the verses in Eyrbyggja saga.'

2 Ibid., p. 572, delete ll. 21–3 and substitute:

`7. Old Norse Literature, 1. The following texts are prescribed: Njáls saga, Egils saga, Óláfs saga helga (Heimskringla), Kormaks saga, Skáldskaparmál, Haustlöng.'

3 Ibid., p. 573, delete ll. 7–12 and substitute:

`(a) Medieval Welsh tales and romances with special reference to Pedeir Keinc y Mabinogi (ed. I. Williams, 1951), Culhwch ac Olwen (ed. R. Bromwich and D.S. Evans, 1988), Owein (ed. R.L. Thomson, 1975), Peredur vab Efrawc (ed. G.W. Goetinck, 1976), Gereint vab Erbin in Llyfr Gwyn Rhydderch (ed. J.G. Evans and R.M. Jones, 1973, pp. 193–226), Cyfranc Lludd a Llevelys (ed. I. Williams, 1922), Breuddwyd Maxen (ed. I. Williams, 1920), Breudwyt Ronabwy (ed. M. Richards, 1948).

(b) Medieval Welsh religious literature with special reference to Blodeugerdd Barddas o Ganu Crefyddol Cynnar (ed. M. Haycock, 1994), The Medieval Welsh Religious Lyric (ed. C.A. McKenna, 1991), and Llyvyr Agkyr Llandewivrevi (ed. J. Morris Jones and J. Rhys).

(c) Gwaith dafydd ap Gwilym (ed. T. Parry) and Gwaith Iolo Goch (ed. d. Johnston, 1988).'

4 Ibid., delete ll. 13–15 and substitute:

`14. Old Norse Literature, II. The following texts are prescribed: Grettis saga, Laxdaela saga, Eyrbyggja saga, Völsunga saga, Hrùlfs saga kraka, Gautreks saga, Sùlarljùd, íslendinga saga (Sturla).'

2 Board of the Faculty of Law

Research degrees in Law

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination decrees, 1996, delete from l. 50 on p. 821 to l. 21 on p. 823 and insert:

`1. Admission to the doctoral and M.Litt. Programmes

Unless they have already successfully completed the two-year BCL course (including the submission of a thesis), candidates for the d.Phil. and the M.Litt. are normally admitted as Probationer Research Students. Subject to the permission of the faculty board those so admitted may if they wish, or if they are unable for any reason to proceed to the d.Phil or M.Litt., transfer to the status of a student for the degree of M.St. in Legal Research. All those admitted to the doctoral and M.Litt. programmes, whatever their initial status, must complete the coursework elements of the M.St. course.

2. Transfer to the d.Phil. or M.Litt.

i. Candidates wishing to transfer to the status of student for the degree of d.Phil. or M.Litt. must, subject to sub-paragraphs (ii) and (iii) below, undertake both parts of the Qualifying Test (paragraph 3 below).

ii. Candidates who, at the time of their application to transfer, have already successfully completed the two-year BCL course (including the submission of a thesis lying in the field of research which they wish to pursue), are exempt from Part B of the Qualifying Test.

iii. Candidates who, at the time of their application to transfer, have already successfully completed the M.St. in Legal Research may, if they wish, satisfy the requirements of Part B of the Qualifying Test by submitting all or part of their completed M.St. thesis. (The attention of candidates who have obtained leave to supplicate for the degree of M.St. in Legal Research is drawn to the fact that transfer to the M.Litt. is in practice excluded by Examination decrees and Regulations Ch. VI, Sect. v, § 6, 5 (i) which, differently from Ch. VI, Sect. viii, § 7, 5 (i) relating to examining the d.Phil., provides that M.Litt. examiners must exclude from consideration inter alia any material submitted for an M.St.).

3. The Qualifying Test

(i) Part A of the Qualifying Test requires that the candidate shall submit to the Graduate Studies Office two typescript or printed copies of a statement of the subject of the proposed thesis and details of the manner in which the candidate proposes to treat it. This statement shall not exceed 2,000 words.

(ii) Part B of the Qualifying Test requires that the candidate shall submit to the Graduate Studies Office two typescript or printed copies of a piece of written work, which may or may not be intended to form part of the proposed thesis but must be relevant to its subject. Where the candidate is seeking to transfer to the d.Phil. this should be of approximately 10,000 words, for the M.Litt. approximately 6,000.

(iii) Supervisors of candidates offering Part B are asked to discuss with the candidate the names of possible assessors, and to provide the Board with the names of three suitable persons who have indicated their willingness to act as assessors if called upon to do so. This notification may be made before the submission of the material, but must be made, at the latest, on the day the material is submitted.

(iv) Subject to sub-paragraph (v) below, candidates admitted as Probationer Research Students to the doctoral or M.Litt. programmes, must submit all materials for the Qualifying Test by the end of the fourth week of Full Term in the third term after the candidate's admission.

(v) Subject to the general time-limit in sub-paragraph (vi) below, the Graduate Studies Committee, having consulted with the supervisor, may, for good cause, allow the Qualifying Test to be deferred.

(vi) In no case may the materials for the Qualifying Test be submitted or resubmitted after the end of the sixth term from the admission of the student to the doctoral or M.Litt. programmes.

4. Assessing the Qualifying Test

(i) The director of Graduate Studies, in consultation with the Chair of the Board, shall appoint two assessors and shall report their appointment to the Board.

(ii) The assessors shall interview the candidate.

(iii) The assessors shall report in writing as to (a) the suitability of the candidate's subject for the kind of thesis in question and (b) the competence of the candidate to handle it at the required level; and, in accordance with their report, the assessors shall make a recommendation.

(iv) The assessors may recommend that the candidate be granted the transfer which has been applied for, that the candidate be refused that transfer, that the candidate be permitted to resubmit or, in the case of an application to transfer to the d.Phil. from a status other than that of the M.Litt. but subject to paragraph 2 (iii) above, that the candidate be permitted to advance only to the M.Litt. (In the case of a Probationer Research Student the recommendation that the candidate be refused permission to transfer has the effect of permitting the candidate to request a retrospective registration for the M.St. in Legal Research under Ch. VI, Sect. xxxi, § 3, 10 of the Examination decrees and Regulations.)

(v) Unless, for good cause shown, the director of Graduate Studies, after consultation with the supervisor, agrees to an extension of time, the assessors must lodge their report and recommendation with the Graduate Studies Office within one calendar month of the date on which the materials are sent out to them.

(vi) The Graduate Studies Office shall pass the report and recommendation to the director of Graduate Studies, who has the authority of the Board to inform the candidate without further delay of the nature of the recommendation and to inform the supervisor of the contents of the report.

(vii) The director of Graduate Studies shall place the report of the assessors before the meeting of the Graduate Studies Committee next following its receipt by the Graduate Studies Office.

(viii) Any resubmission must be made through the Graduate Studies Office within the time limit specified in paragraph 3 (v) and (vi) above.'

2 Renumber paragraphs 4 and 5 as 5 and 6.

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3 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

(a) M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

1 In Examination decrees, 1996, delete from p. 589, l. 26 to p. 592, l. 17 and substitute:

`1. Qualifications. Candidates must satisfy the board that they possess the necessary qualifications in Greek and/or Latin to profit by the course.

2.Course. Every candidate must follow for at least six terms a course of instruction in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature. Candidates will, when they enter for the examination, be required to produce from their society a certificate that they are following such a course.

3. Options. See the schedule below. Candidates are required to offer a thesis (c) and any two options chosen from A and B.

4. Approval of Options. The choice of options will be subject to the approval of the candidate's supervisor and of the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics, having regard to the candidate's previous experience, the range covered by the proposed options, and the availability of teaching and examining resources. Not all options may be available in any given year. Candidates must submit their provisional choice of options to the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics not later than Tuesday of first week in the Hilary Full Term next after the beginning of their course; the proposed thesis title not later than Tuesday of first week in the Trinity Full Term next following; and the proposed titles of any presubmitted essays (see §§ 5 and 6) as soon as practicable, but in any case no later than Tuesday of first week in the Hilary Full Term of the second year of the course.

5. Examination. Each option in Section A will be examined by one written paper (3 hours) of passages for translation and comment (passages for comment will be set only from the books listed under a in each case; discussion of textual points and readings will not be required) and either by three presubmitted essays (see § 6) which between them display knowledge of more than a narrow range of the topic or by one written paper of essays (3 hours). For the papers to be set in the options under Section B, see the detailed schedule.

6. Presubmitted essays. Essays should each be of between 5,000 and 7,500 words. Supervisors or others are permitted to give bibliographical help with, and to discuss a first draft of, such essays. The essays (two typewritten or printed copies) must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Essays presubmitted for the M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature' to the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, to arrive by noon on Thursday of sixth week in the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken. Essays must be accompanied by a statement signed by the candidate to the effect that, except as otherwise indicated, they are his or her own work. This statement must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the essays.

7. Oral Examination. Candidates are required to present themselves for oral examination if summoned by the examiners.

8. distinction. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.

9. A candidate who fails to satisfy the examiners may enter for the examination on one (but not more than one) subsequent occasion (as provided by Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 2, paragraph 4). If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by a candidate, while not of sufficient merit to qualify for the degree of M.Phil., is nevertheless of sufficient merit to qualify for the degree of Master of Studies in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature, the candidate shall be given the option of resitting the M.Phil. or of being granted leave to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies.

SCHEDULE

Section A

1. Aeschylus
[alpha] Seven against Thebes, Agamemnon, Choephori, Eumenides.

[beta] Persae, Supplices.

2. Euripides
[alpha]Medea, Electra, Heracles, Ion, Orestes.

[beta] Alcestis, Hippolytus, Hecuba, Trojan Women, Helen.

3. Plato

[alpha] Phaedrus, Gorgias.

[beta] Ion, Republic X; Gorgias, Helen.

4. Hellenistic poetry

[alpha] Theocritus 1, 3, 7, 10, 13, 15, 16, 28; Callimachus, Hymns 1, 5, 6; frr. 1, 67–75, 110, 178, 191, 194, 260 (this last fr. to be read in Callimachus, Hecale (ed. A.S. Hollis) frr. 69–74); epigrams 2, 4, 8, 13, 16, 19, 21, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 41, 43,, 46, 50 Pf.; Herodas 4; Apollonius, Argonautica III; Asclepiades 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, 12, 16, 18, 25, 26, 28, 32 Page.

[beta] Apollonius, Argonautica IV. 1–481; Moschus, Europa; Herodas 2, 6; Callimachus, Hymn 2.

5. Greek Comedy

[alpha] Aristophanes, Wasps, Birds, Ecclesiazusae; Menander, Dyscolus, Samia.

[beta] Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae, Wealth; Menander, the remaining works included in Menander, Plays and Fragments, translated by N. Miller (Penguin Classics).

6. Lucretius

[alpha] Books I, III, and V.

[beta] Books II, IV, and VI.

7. Cicero the orator

[alpha] Pro Sexto Roscio Amerino, Pro Archia, Pro Milone, Pro Marcello, Philippics I, II.

[beta] Auctor ad Herennium I, II. 1–12, 47–50, IV. 11–16; Cicero, de Imperio Cn. Pompei, Pro C. Rabirio perduellionis reo, Pro Caelio, de Oratore II. 71–216, 290–349.

8. Horace

[alpha] Epodes, Odes II, IV, Carmen Saeculare, Epistles I, II.

[beta] Satires I, Odes I.

9. The Ancient Novel

[alpha] Apuleius, Metamorphoses I, IV.28–VI.24, VIII–XI; Petronius, Satyrica 26.7–78 < p>(Cena Trimalchionis).

[beta] Apuleius, Metamorphoses II, III, IV.1–27, VI.25–32, VII; [Lucian], Onos; Petronius, Satyrica 1–26.6, 79–117; Longus, daphnis and Chloe; Heliodorus, Aethiopica; Chariton, Callirhoe.

10. Any other text or combination of texts approved by the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics.

In 1–9 passages for translation and comment will be set from the editions listed in the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores. The editions to be used for any option approved under 10 will be specified by the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics.

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Section B

1. The transmission of Greek texts, and the elements of palaeography and textual criticism, with closer study of Euripides, Andromache. Candidates will be required (i) to presubmit two essays on some aspect of the transmission of Greek texts or textual criticism, (ii) to transcribe a passage from a medieval manuscript (1 hour), and (iii) to answer questions on passages from the prescribed play (3 hours). (Candidates will be expected to show such knowledge of Greek metre as is necessary to the proper handling of the text.)

2.The transmission of Latin texts, and the elements of palaeography and textual criticism, with closer study of Ovid, Heroides 3, 5, 8, 9, 16, 17. Candidates will be required (i) to presubmit two essays on some aspect of the transmission of Latin texts or textual criticism, (ii) to transcribe a passage from a medieval manuscript (1 hour), and (iii) to answer questions on passages from the prescribed poems (3 hours). (Candidates will be expected to show such knowledge of Latin metre as is necessary to the proper handling of the text.)

3. Greek Papyrology, with special reference to literary papyri. Candidates will be required (i) to sit a paper of essays, and (ii) to undertake a practical test, in their own time, in deciphering and commenting on original papyri. (Each candidate will be assigned a papyrus or small group of papyri not later than Saturday of sixth week in the Hilary Full Term preceding the examination; he or she must prepare an edition of it, in proper scholarly form, and deliver two typed copies of this edition to the Clerk of the Schools not later than noon on Monday of third week in the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken. The copies should be accompanied by a statement signed by the candidate to the effect that they are solely his or her own work. This statement must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the copies.)

4. Comparative Philology, with special reference to the history of the Greek and/or Latin language. Two papers will be set. Paper (i), Essays, will cover (a) basic questions about the comparative and/or historical grammar of Greek and/or Latin, and (b) questions about the history of the Greek and/or Latin language. Paper (ii), texts for translation and linguistic commentary, will include a compulsory question with passages from either Greek dialect inscriptions or Latin archaic inscriptions; other passages will be set from Greek and/or Latin literary texts; there will be an opportunity to show knowledge of Linear B and/or Oscan and Umbrian.

5. Theory and methodology of classical literary studies. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the major theoretical and methodological issues that arise in the study of ancient literature, and with the major positions in contemporary critical theory and their relationship to classical studies. They will be required to show knowledge of a range of issues in these areas. Examination will be by means of six presubmitted essays; a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words may be substituted for three of these essays.

6. Any other subject approved by the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics, which will determine the method of examination.

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Section C

A thesis of up to 25,000 words, on a subject to be proposed by the candidate in consultation with the supervisor, and approved by the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics. Supervisors or others are permitted to give bibliographical help and to discuss a first draft. The thesis (two typewritten or printed copies) must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Thesis for the M.Phil. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature' to reach the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, by noon on Thursday of sixth week in the Trinity Full Term in which the examination is to be taken. The thesis must be accompanied by a statement signed by the candidate to the effect that, except as otherwise indicated, the thesis is his or her own work. This statement must be placed in a sealed envelope bearing the candidate's examination number and presented together with the thesis.

The examiners may invite a successful candidate to agree that one copy of his or her thesis be deposited in the Bodleian Library.'

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(b) M.St. in Greek and/or Latin Languages and Literature

In Examination decrees, 1996, p. 668, after l. 8 insert:

`In (i)–(v) passages for translation or comment will be set from the editions listed in the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores; for (vi) from the latest impression of the Oxford Classical Text (Cicero, de Oratore, Wilkins; Orator, Wilkins; Quintilian, Winterbottom). The editions to be used for any option approved under (vii) will be specified by the Graduate Studies Committee in Classics.'

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4 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

(a) Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination decrees, 1996, p. 479, ll. 30, 31, and 40, and p. 480, ll. 7 and 15, delete `213' and substitute `214'.

2 Ibid., p. 481, l. 22, delete `Politics' and insert `Relations'.

3 Ibid., delete l. 23 and insert `213. International Relations in the Era of the Cold War'.

4 Ibid., delete l. 24 and the footnote and insert `214. International Relations'.

5 Ibid., p. 484, l. 21, delete `Politics' and insert `Relations'.

6 Ibid., delete l. 30 and insert `213. International Relations in the Era of the Cold War'.

7 Ibid., l. 31, after `the major powers' insert `1945–85'.

8 Ibid., delete ll. 39–50 and insert:

`214. International Relations

The principal theories, concepts, and institutions of international relations. Topics include: law and norms, order, self-determination, security, war and conflict resolution, foreign-policy analysis, international political economy, dominance and dependence, regional integration, and international institutions. Candidates will be required to show knowledge of international affairs since 1985. Questions requiring specific knowledge of earlier events will not be set, but opportunities will be given to display it.'

9 Ibid., p. 486, delete ll. 7–10 and insert:

`The history of society in Britain since 1870, including: the family; population; class, gender, and social stratification; industrial relations; immigration and ethnic minorities; living standards, health and welfare, education; leisure, population culture and the media; religion; crime; the social impact of war. The paper will include questions which involve a familiarity with primary documents (specified below). Questions concerned exclusively with the period since 1951 will not be set.'

10 Ibid., ll. 27–8, delete `ed. P. Abrams, The Origins of British Sociology: 1834–1914 (1968, documents only);'.

11 Ibid., l. 35, delete `(1957)' and insert:

`(1957, repr. 1984); Royal Commission on the Press Report (Cmnd. 7700, Appendices III (newspaper circulation figures), IV (development of the five principal chains) and VII (contents and methods of presenting news); Report of the Committee on Broadcasting (Pilkington Report, 1962, Cmnd. 1753; Q.d. Leavis, Fiction and the Reading Public (1932, repr. 1968, Part I chs. 1–3, Part II ch. 4, Part III chs. 1–3); Sheila Stewart, Lifting the Latch (1987); Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Inquiry into Income and Wealth (1995).'

12 Ibid., delete l. 36.

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(b) M.Sc. in Economics for development

(i) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination decrees, 1996, p. 727, delete ll. 7–20 and substitute `(b) an extended essay'.

2 Ibid., l. 24, delete `The essay shall not normally exceed 5,000 words' and substitute `The essay shall not exceed 10,000 words.'.

3 Ibid., ll. 24–5, delete `and in no circumstances . . . exceed 10,000 words.'

4 Ibid., l. 30, delete `will' and substitute `may'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination decrees, 1996, p. 727, delete ll. 39–42 and substitute:

`Candidates are expected to reach a postgraudate level in modern micro- and macroeconomic theory, and also be able to explain how this theory should be modified to take account of the structural and institutional characteristics of developing countries. Specific topics to be covered will normally include the following: microeconomic decision-making: individuals, households, firms. Welfare and inequality. Theory of institutions. Trade theories. Macroeconomics for development: consumption and investment; saving and capital markets. Government and international finance. Open-economy equilibrium and response to shocks. Growth theory. Policy analysis. International economic transmission and co-ordination.'

2 Ibid., delete ll. 44–50 and substitute:

`Questions will be set on development topics from a series of taught modules. The modules offered may vary from year to year, but will normally include such topics as: human development, poverty and income distribution; rural development; environment; industry and technology; fiscal policy; project evaluation; macro-economic policy and adjustment; aspects of the international economy.'

3 Ibid., p. 728, l. 3, delete `data production and'.

4 Ibid., delete ll. 4–9 and substitute:

`Candidates are expected to reach a postgraduate level in modern econometric methods, particularly in their application to the analysis of data on developing economies. Specific topics to be covered will normally include the following: probability theory, sampling theory and statistical inference. Econometric methodology. Estimation methods (Least Squares, Maximum Likelihood, Generalised Method of Moments). Semi-parametric and non-parametric estimation. Econometric methods for analysis of cross-section, time-series and panel data. Econometric analysis of dynamic models, simultaneous equation systems, limited dependent variable models.'

5 Ibid., delete ll. 10–50.

6 Ibid., p. 729, delete ll. 1–6.

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5 Committee on Continuing Education

Foundation Certificate in Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination decrees, 1996, p. 968, after l. 27, after the decree establishing the Foundation Certificate in Modern History, insert:

`(ii) REGULATIONS

1. Not later than the end of the second week of Michaelmas Term, the department for Continuing Education shall forward to the Registrar the names of non-members of the University who wish to be registered as candidates for the Foundation Certificate in Modern History, together with the registration fee prescribed in Ch. VIII, Sect. i, § 2 (see Appendix I) in accordance with Ch. X, Sect. viii, cll. 2 and 4.

2.Every candidate for the certificate must follow for at least six terms, and at most nine terms, a part-time course of instruction in Modern History. This will comprise:

(i) Six papers, of which there will be two on each of the topics set out below. Each paper will be of two hours' duration.

(a) British history either 1815–1979

(a) British hisotyr or 1500–1688

(b) European History 1815–1914

(c) Optional paper (source-based) to be chosen from a list to be published annually by the board of studies before the end of the last week of Trinity Term.

(ii) Nine coursework essays, of a format and length approved by the board of studies of the Committee on Continuing Education, and to be submitted at such times as the Board of Studies may lay down. Essays must be the candidate's own work and every candidate must submit a statement to that effect.

(iii) One extended essay of 5,000–7,500 words on a candidate's optional subject. The extended essay must be submitted at such time as the board of studies may lay down and must be the candidate's own work and every candidate must submit a statement to that effect.

(iv) An oral examination (if the examiners think fit in a particular case).

3. A candidate who fails an examination paper may be permitted to retake that paper on not more than one occasion which normally shall be within one year of the initial failure.'

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6 Committee for the School of Management Studies

Postgraduate diploma in Management Studies

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1996, p. 937, l. 2 delete `Three' and substitute `Four'.

2 Ibid., after l. 11, insert `A fourth core course from a range of options to be notified to candidates at the start of the course'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 12–34 and substitute:

`4. The examination will be in four parts:

(a) Qualifying Examination

The examination shall be held after completion of the first two core courses. It shall consist of one written paper covering elements of the first two core courses. Candidates who fail the examination shall be permitted to retake it on one, but not more than one subsequent occasion.

(b) Final examination

No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he or she has already passed the qualifying examination. The final examination will cover elements of all four core courses.

(c) Each candidate will undertake a business project as part of a group assignment. Competence will be examined by means of reports from the candidate's supervisor, and from the sponsoring firm, by a project report, and by a presentation of this report. The report shall not exceed 6,000 words.

(d) Each candidate will be required to propose, research, and submit a dissertation not exceeding 10,000 words on a topic agreed by the examiners. The dissertation must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners, c/o the Postgraduate Secretary, School of Management Studies, by Friday of Sixth Week of Trinity Term in the year in which it is intended to finish the course.'

4 Ibid., l. 42, after `normally' insert `shall'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards and committee give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Clinical Medicine

T. BOND, Hertford: `Volume-regulated ion channels and their interaction with P-glycoprotein'.
University Laboratory of Physiology, Thursday, 20 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.C. Ellory, P. Brown.

NORIHIRO KATO, Wadham: `Finding the genes that cause essential hypertension'.
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Tuesday, 11 March, 3 p.m.
Examiners: P.J. Ratcliffe, F. Soubrier.

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English Language and Literature

R. DALRYMPLE, St Peter's: `The pious formulae of the Middle English romances: a catalogue and stylistic study'.
Examination Schools, Monday, 24 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: E.H. Cooper, T. Turville-Petre.

M. DU PLESSIS, Lincoln: `Logical proposition in the non-dramatic poetry of Ben Jonson'.
Somerville, Monday, 17 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: K.d. duncan-Jones, G. Campbell.

C. ROBERTS, Trinity: `Harriet Martineau and Victorian ideologies'.
St Anne's, Wednesday, 23 April, 1.45 p.m.
Examiners: P. Ingham, S. Foster.

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Physical Sciences

G.H.W. SANDERS, St John's: `The dissolution of organic solids'.
Examination Schools, Friday, 14 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: H.A.O. Hill, G. Attard.

M. SHADE, Linacre: `Redox-active calixarenes as receptors for anions and neutral molecules'.
Dyson Perrins Laboratory, Thursday, 27 March, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: C.A. Hunter, H.L. Anderson.

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Social Studies

F. MACAULY, St Antony's: `Gender politics in Brazil and Chile: the role of parties in national and local policy- making'.
All Souls, Tuesday, 18 March, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A. Stepan, J. Foweraker.

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Committee for the School of Management Studies

R. HAMILTON PITKETHLY, Templeton: `The use of intellectual property in high-technology Japanese and western companies'.
New College, Friday, 14 March, 2 p.m.
Examiners: K. Pavitt, R. Whittington.

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