Examinations and Boards

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 10 May.

1 Board of the Faculty of Biological Sciences

(a) Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 28, after l. 29 following the decree establishing the Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences, insert:

`1. Each candidate shall offer three papers (each of three hours' duration) corresponding to the first three sections (1–3) of the schedule below.

2.Heads of laboratories, or their deputies, shall make available to the moderators records showing the extent to which each candidate has attended and pursued adequate courses of class work and laboratory work in each of the four sections (1–4) of the schedule below. Candidates shall submit notebooks containing reports, initialled by the demonstrators, of practical or class work in each subject completed during their course of study. These notebooks shall be available to the moderators during the period of the examination and, together with the laboratory and class records, shall be taken into consideration by the moderators in determining the examination result.

3. The moderators will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. [ ].

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Schedule

1. Organisms

History and present day diversity of organisms. Origin of life, evolution and diversity of procaryotes; algae; aquatic animal groups, both invertebrate and vertebrate. The origin and terrestrial radiation of fungi, green plants, insects and tetrapod animals. The biology and diversity of birds and mammals. The evolution of humans and their impact on the environment.

2. Cells and Genes

Machinery of the cell: structural features of the building blocks of life; enzymes and metabolism; structure and function of membranes; mitochondria, chloroplasts and energy transduction; the cytoskeleton; the extracellular matrix; interactions between cells; cell division and growth.

Genetics: Mendelian and population genetics; genetics of multicellular and unicellular organisms; molecular genetics; recombinant DNA; the gene at work.

3. Populations

Interrelationships of organisms and their interactions with the physical environment. Competition, co-operation, predator-prey and host-parasite interactions. The nature and origin of species and their interactions as communities. Energy flow, bio-geochemical cycles and biotic structure of ecosystems.

4. Computing and data handling

Hands-on introduction to computers; use of files, printers, word-processing and spreadsheets. Introduction to the importance of quantitative methods in biology. Descriptive statistics and graphical representations of data.

Frequency distributions. Populations and samples. Sampling distribution of the mean, standard errors, confidence intervals. Estimation and hypothesis testing. The Central Limit theorem. The Binomial, Poisson and Normal Distributions.'

2 Ibid., delete p. 77, l. 30 to p. 79, l. 37 and substitute:

`1. Three written papers shall be set in the examination, corresponding to the first three sections of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

2.Paper 1 will be on topics specified in Section 1: Organisms of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

Paper 2 will be on topics specified in Section 2: Cells and Genes of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

Paper 3 will be on topics specified in Section 3: Populations of the Schedule for Honour Moderations in Biological Sciences.

3. The questions set may be of an elementary and straightforward nature.

4. A practical examination and/or a computer/data handling exercise may be set in the case of candidates deemed to have an inadequate record of practical or class work.'

(b) Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, delete p. 441, l. 35 to p. 442, l. 43, and substitute:

`1. Evolution and Systematics

2.Quantitative Methods

3. Animal Biology I

4. Animal Biology II

5. Plant and Microbial Biology I

6. Plant and Microbial Biology II

7. Environmental Biology I

8. Environmental Biology II

9. Cell and Developmental Biology I

10. Cell and Developmental Biology II

11. The Biology of Animal and Plant Disease I

12. The Biology of Animal and Plant Disease II. Candidates will be required to take seven written papers as follows: Papers (1) and (2) together with three papers from the group (3), (5), (7), (9), (11) and two papers from the group (4), (6), (8), (10), (12). Candidates offering paper (4) must also offer paper (3); candidates offering paper

(6) must also offer paper (5); candidates offering paper (8) must also offer paper (7); candidates offering paper (10) must also offer paper (9); candidates offering paper

(12) must also offer paper (11). Each paper shall be of three hours' duration. Papers (3), (5), (7), (9) and (11) will examine the second year coursework. Papers (4), (6), (8), (10), and (12) will examine second and third year coursework. In all papers knowledge of first year coursework will be assumed.

Candidates will be required to offer a written report on a project in any area of biology. The project report shall be submitted on or before 12 noon on the Friday of the sixth week of the term preceding that in which the examination is held. It must be addressed to `The Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford OX1 4BG, for the Chairman of Examiners for the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences)'. Each project report shall be accompanied by a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the project report is the candidate's own work. This certificate shall be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of Examiners. No report will be accepted if it has already been submitted, wholly or substantially, for another Honour School or degree of this University, or for a degree of any other institution.

2.Candidates shall submit notebooks containing reports, initialled by the demonstrators, of practical work completed during their course of study. These notebooks shall be available to the examiners on or before noon on Friday of the first week of the term in which the examination is held. Each notebook shall be accompanied by a sealed envelope (bearing only the candidate's examination number) containing a certificate signed by the candidate indicating that the notebook submitted is the candidate's own work. Heads of laboratories or their deputies shall make available to the examiners records showing the extent to which a candidate has attended and pursued an adequate course of practical work. The examiners shall take this evidence into consideration in determining the examination result.

3. Candidates shall be required to carry out field work and attend such vacation courses as are approved from time to time by the Sub-faculty of Biology.

4. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.

5. The examiners will not provide calculators, but will permit the use of any hand-held pocket calculator subject to the conditions set out on p. [ ].

Schedule of Subjects

1. Evolution and Systematics

Evolution as the central theme of biology. Methods and data of phylogeny reconstruction. Biogeography. Macroevolutionary change; origin of the major groups, extinction, punctuated equilibrium. Adaptation. Comparative Method. Natural selection. Units of selection. Molecular evolution. Evolution of sex. The modern synthesis.

2. Quantitative Methods

Principles and practice of the application to biology of (i) statistics and (ii) mathematical and computer modelling.

3. and 4. Animal Biology

The structure, function, evolution and behaviour of animals. Control and information systems, homeostasis and biomechanics of movement. Life history strategies and evolution of mammals. Evolutionary, causal and developmental aspects of animal behaviour. The biology of social behaviour including the evolution of aggression, co-operation and communication. Mate choice and kin selection. Behavioural ecology. Perception, learning and decision-making in animals. The genetics of behaviour. Neurobiological bases of behaviour.

5. and 6. Plant and Microbial Biology

The biological diversity of plants and microorganisms, including aspects of their ecology and evolution, structural and functional characteristics, life histories, reproduction, taxonomy and systematics, physiology and biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, biotechnology, and also the importance of interactions between plants and micro-organisms.

7. and 8. Environmental Biology

Methods in ecology including the description and analysis of plant and animal communities. Ecology and conservation biology examining the genetic and population consequences and possible remedies for biodiversity loss. The ecology of forest and agricultural systems. Studies of major causes and biological consequences of global environmental change. The theory and practice of wildlife resource management.

9. and 10. Cell and Developmental Biology

Mechanisms operating to co-ordinate cellular changes in the development of tissues and organs and complete animal and plant forms. Regulation of cell division and differentiation. Environmental signals coordinating and modulating development. Regulation of gene expression. Techniques of genetic modification used in the study of cellular and developmental processes.

11. and 12. Biology of Animal and Plant Disease

The biology, epidemiology and control of animal and plant disease. The biology of macro- and micro-parasites, host genetics and disease resistance. Molecular genetics of plant and animal parasites, epidemiology and control of disease. Modelling disease and vector-borne disease.'

(c) Pass School of Biological Sciences

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 454, delete ll. 2–8 and substitute:

`Candidates shall be subject to the regulations specified in clauses 1–4 for the Honour School of Natural Science (Biological Sciences) save that, respecting clause 1 of those regulations, they shall be required to offer a total of five written papers. These shall be papers (1) and (2), together with two papers from the group (3), (5), (7), (9), (11), and one paper from the group (4), (6), (8), (10), (12). The permitted combinations of optional papers shall be as specified in that clause.'

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2 Board of the Faculty of Law

Honour School of Jurisprudence

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 260, after l. 17 insert:

`Course 1. [Until October 1998 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23.] [From October 1998 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23; and one special subject; provided that candidates may substitute any two special subjects for one of the standard subject papers 5–23.]

`Course 2. [Until October 1999 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23.] [From October 1999 Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23; and one special subject; provided that candidates may substitute any two special subjects for one of the standard subject papers 5–23.]

STANDARD SUBJECTS'.

2 Ibid., p. 261, l. 2, delete `two' and substitute `three'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 5–6.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 261, after l. 4 insert:

`SPECIAL SUBJECTS

A list of special subjects approved by the Board of the Faculty of Law from time to time by regulation published in the Gazetteshall be posted in the Law Faculty and sent to college tutors, together with individual specifications and examination methods, not later than the beginning of the [until 1 October 1997 sixth] [from 1 October 1997 eighth] term before that in which the Honour School examination will be held. Depending on the availability of teaching resources, not all special subjects will be available to all candidates in every given year. A list of possible special subjects is given below.

1. European Community Competition Law;

2.European Community Social, Environmental and Consumer Law;

3. Lawyers' Ethics;

4. Introduction to the Law of Copyright and Moral Rights.'

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3 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humanities and Oriental Studies

Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 481, l. 28, after `Mathematics and Philosophy,' insert `Oriental Studies,'.

2 Ibid., p. 487, l. 32, delete `132, and 133' and substitute `and 132 may be offered only by candidates in Literae Humaniores and Oriental Studies, and subject 133.'

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4 Board of the Faculty of Music

Honour Moderations in Music and the Preliminary Examination in Music

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 70, delete ll. 7–30 and substitute:

`Each candidate will be required to offer papers 1–4 and one of the options in paper five.

1. Techniques of Composition

A three-hour paper which will test basic compositional techniques in the context of eighteenth-century idioms. In Section A candidates will be required to elaborate two parts above a bass in a Baroque idiom OR to write a fugal exposition in three parts, plus episode (using related material) and first middle entry, again for trio. In Section B candidates will be required to complete an excerpt from a string quartet (the first violin part being given).

2. Analysis

A three-hour paper which will test the ability to produce analyses of the formal, structural, and motivic aspects of two pieces. Candidates will be required to write two essays; one on a piece from the early eighteenth century and one on a piece from the later eighteenth century. The essays will allow candidates to display their own interests in analytical method.

3. History of Music

A three-hour paper divided into two sections. Section A will comprise questions on general issues relating to the study of music history. Section B will comprise questions on six topics of a thematic nature. Candidates will be required to answer four questions, at least one from section A and at least two from Section B. The Board of the Faculty of Music shall approve, and publish each year by notice in the Faculty of Music not later than the end of the Hilary Term a list of the topics to be examined in the following academic year.

4. Keyboard skills

A practical examination in score reading and playing from a figured bass.

5. Options

Candidates must choose one from the following:

(a) Source Studies and Performance Practice

A three hour paper.

(b) A portfolio of compositions

Candidates are required to submit two compositions: a vocal setting and a purely instrumental piece. A piece may be a single movement from a projected longer work. All work submitted must have been composed since the first day of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which it is to be examined.

(c) Performance

A solo performance of some 10–12 minutes in length.

(d) Extended essay

An essay of 4,000–5,000 words on a subject to be chosen in consultation with the candidate's tutor.

The Board of the Faculty of Music will approve and publish by notice in the Faculty of Music not later than the end of the Trinity Term in the academic year preceding that in which the material is to be examined, an indicative list of possible titles for extended essays. This list is intended as guidance for tutors and candidates, not as an exhaustive list of acceptable titles.'

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5 Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies

(a) Honour School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 458, l. 44, after `Chinese' in the list of Main Subjects, insert `Classics'. 2 Ibid., l. 46, after `Armenian' in the list of Additional Languages, insert `Classics'.

3 Ibid., after `Prakrit' in the list of Additional Languages, insert `Sanskrit'.

4 Ibid., p. 459, l. 1, after `offering' insert `Classics,'.

5 Ibid., p. 461, l. 5, after `Armenian' insert `Classics'.

6 Ibid., p. 464, after l. 42 insert:

`Classics

Candidates will be required to offer five of the following subjects (i)–(xxiv), and also three papers on one of the additional languages Akkadian, Arabic, Aramaic and Syriac, Armenian, Coptic, Egyptology, Hebrew, Old Iranian, Pali, Persian or Sanskrit.

Candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC of Honour Moderations in Classics or of the Preliminary Examination in Classics must offer (i) and (v) as two of their five subjects; they may not offer (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language.

Other candidates not offering (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language must include at least two of subjects (i)–(xv), of which one must be either (i) or (v); they may offer both (i) and (v) if they wish.

Subject (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language counts as two subjects. Candidates offering it must also offer either (i) or (v), and may offer both. Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available on all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

(i) Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.1].

(ii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.2]

Either(a) Early Greek Hexameter Poetry

or(b) Greek Lyric and Elegiac Poetry

or (c) Pindar and Bacchylides.

(iii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.3]

Either (a) Aeschylus

or (b) Euripides.

(iv) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.4]

Either (a) Thucydides and Rhetoric

or (b) Plato

or (c) Greek Comedy Old and New (not to be offered in combination with subject (viii)(a), Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy)

or (d) Hellenistic Poetry.

(v) Latin Literature of the First Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.5].

(vi) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.6]

Either (a) Latin Didactic Poetry

or (b) Latin Satire

or (c) Latin Historiography.

(vii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.7]

Either (a) Cicero the Orator

or (b) Horace

or (c) Ovid

or (d) Seneca and Lucan.

(viii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.8; in each case version (i) is the only version available to candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC of Honour Moderations in Classics or of the Preliminary Examination in Classics]

Either (a) Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy (not to be offered in combination with subject (iv)(c), Greek Comedy Old and New)

or (b) Ancient Literary Criticism

or (c) The Ancient Novel.

(ix) Greek Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.9].

(x) Latin Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.10].

(xi) Homer, Iliad[Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper I]. (This subject may not be offered by candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, IC, or IIB of Honour Moderations in Classics and may not be offered in combination with subject (ii)(a), Early Greek Hexameter Poetry.)

(xii) Virgil, Aeneid. Translation and essay questions will be required; commentary questions will be optional. (This subject may not be offered by candidates who have satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, IC, or IIA of Honour Moderations in Classics.)

(xiii) Either (a) The Conversion of Augustine [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(a)].

or (b) Medieval Latin [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(b)].

or (c) The Latin Works of Petrarch, with special study of Africa (ed. N. Festa, Florence, 1926), Books I, II, V, VII, IX. Candidates will also be expected to have read Vita Scipionis(in La vita di Scipione l' Africano, ed. G. Martillotti, Milano-Napoli, 1954), and to show acquaintance with Petrach's major Latin works (e.g. Rerum memorandum libri (ed. G. Billanovich, Florence, 1945), De secreto conflictu curarum mearum, De vita solitaria, Epistolae familiares(in F. Petrarca, Prose, ed. G. Martillotti, P.G. Ricci, E. Carrara, E. Bianchi, Milano-Napoli, 1955)).

or (d) Procopius, with special study of Bellum Persicum1.24, 2.22-3; Bellum Gothicum 4.20, 4.29-35; Historia Arcana6–12 (all in Dewing's Loeb edition).

(xiv) Greek Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.11]. (This subject may be combined with one but not more than one of (xv), (xvi), and (xvii).)

(xv) Latin Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.12]. (This subject may be combined with one but not more than one of (xiv), (xvi), and (xvii).)

(xvi) Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V, VI F(1)]. (This subject may not be offered by candidates who offered it in Honour Moderations in Classics or in the Preliminary Examination in Classics. It may be combined with one but not more than one of (xiv), (xv), and (xvii).)

(xvii) General Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.13]. (This subject may be combined with one but not more than one of (xiv), (xv), and (xvi).)

(xviii) Either (a) Greek History from 776 bc to 479 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.1; not to be offered in combination with subject (xix)(a), The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc–500 bc].

or (b) Greek History from 479 bc to 403 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.2].

or (c) Greek History from 403 bc to 336 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.3].

or (d) Roman History from 240 bc to 133 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.4].

or (e) Roman History from 133 bc to 50 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.5].

or (f) Roman History from 49 bc to ad 54 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.6].

or (g) Roman History from ad 54 to ad 138 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.7].

Note: Candidates offering any of subjects (xviii) (a)–(g) must also offer the associated translation paper set in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores. (xix) Either (a) The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc–500 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.1; not to be offered in combination with subject (xviii)(a), Greek History from 776 bc to 479 bc].

or (b) Greek Archaeology and Art c.500 bc–323 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.2].

or (c) The Archaeology and Art of Roman Italy in the Late Republic and Early Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.3].

or (d) Cities and Settlement in the Roman Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.4].

(xx) Either subject 130 or subject 131 or subject 132, as specified in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.

(xxi) Modern Greek Poetry [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(c)]. (This subject is available only to candidates offering subject (i), Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc who are offering neither (xiii)(d), Procopius nor (xxiii), (xxiv), Second Classical Language.)

(xxii) Thesis. Any candidate may offer a thesis in Classics, or in a subject linking Classics and their Additional Language, in accordance with the Regulation on Theses in the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, save that references there to the Honour School of Literae Humaniores shall be deemed to be references to the Honour School of Oriental Studies (with Classics as Main Subject) and that the Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores shall consult the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies as appropriate. Candidates who offer two of subjects (xiv)–(xvii) may not also offer a thesis in Philology or Linguistics.

(xxiii), (xxiv) (see introductory notes) Second Classical Language [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject V.1 and V.2]. (Candidates who offer Second Classical Language must offer either both subjects in Greek or both subjects in Latin, and may not offer either subject in the same language as they offered in Course IIA or IIB of Honour Moderations or the Preliminary Examination in Classics.)'

7 Ibid., p. 465, l. 6, after `Syriac,' insert `Classics,'.

8 Ibid., p. 468, l. 13, after `Syriac,' insert `Classics,'.

9 Ibid., p. 472, l. 27, after `Armenian,' insert `Classics,'.

10 Ibid., p. 473, l. 49, after `4.' insert `(For candidates offering Old Iranian, Pali, or Prakrit as additional language)'. 11 Ibid., p. 474, after l. 19 insert:

`Either'.

12 Ibid., after l. 21 insert:

`Or

8, 9, and 10. Three papers on Classics as an additional language.' 13 Ibid., p. 476, l. 26, after `Arabic,' insert `Classics,'. 14 Ibid., after l. 48 insert: `Or (for candidates offering Classics as main subject) Selected texts (list available from the Oriental Institute)'.

15 Ibid., p. 477, l.3, after `offering' insert `Classics,'. 16 Ibid., l. 15, after `Arabic,' insert `Classics,'. 17 Ibid., l. 46, after `Arabic,' insert `Classics,'. 18 Ibid., p. 478, l. 4, after `offering' insert `Classics or'. 19 Ibid., after l. 14 insert:

`Classics (for candidates offering Arabic, Egyptology, Hebrew, Persian or Sanskrit as main subject). [1]

Candidates will be required to offer three of the following subjects (i)–(xxiv). Candidates not offering (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners must include at least two of subjects (i)–(xv), of which one must be either (i) or (v); they may offer both (i) and (v) if they wish.

Subject (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners counts as two subjects.

Candidates offering this must offer as their third subject one of (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), (xi), (xiv), (xviii) (a)–(d) and (xx) if offering Greek, or one of subjects (v), (vi), (vii) (xii), (xv) and (xviii) (e)–(g) if offering Latin.

Note: It cannot be guaranteed that university lectures or classes or college teaching will be available on all subjects in every academic year. Candidates are advised to consult their tutors about the availability of teaching when selecting their subjects.

(i) Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.1].

(ii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.2]

Either (a) Early Greek Hexameter Poetry (not to be offered in combination with subject (xi), Homer, Iliad)

or (b) Greek Lyric and Elegiac Poetry

or (c) Pindar and Bacchylides. (iii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.3]

Either (a) Aeschylus

or (b) Euripides. (iv) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.4]

Either (a) Thucydides and Rhetoric

or (b) Plato

or (c) Greek Comedy Old and New (not to be offered in combination with subject (viii)(a), Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy)

or (d) Hellenistic Poetry.

(v) Latin Literature of the First Century bc (one paper of three hours (commentary and essay) with an additional paper (one-and-a-half hours) of translation) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.5].

(vi) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.6]

Either (a) Latin Didactic Poetry

or (b) Latin Satire

or (c) Latin Historiography. (vii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.7]

Either (a) Cicero the Orator

or (b) Horace

or (c) Ovid

or (d) Seneca and Lucan. (viii) [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.8]

Either (a) Greek New Comedy and Roman Comedy (not to be offered in combination with subject (iv)(c), Greek Comedy Old and New)

or (b) Ancient Literary Criticism

or (c) The Ancient Novel.

(ix) Greek Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.9].

(x) Latin Textual Criticism [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.10].

(xi) Homer, Iliad [Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper I; not be offered combination with subject (ii)(a), Early Greek Hexameter Poetry].

(xii) Virgil, Aeneid. Translation and essay questions will be required; commentary questions will be optional.

(xiii) Either (a) The Conversion of Augustine [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(a)].

or (b) Medieval Latin [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(b)].

or (c) The Latin Works of Petrarch, with special study of Africa (ed. N. Festa, Florence, 1926), Books I, II, V, VII, IX. Candidates will also be expected to have read Vita Scipionis (in La vita di Scipione l' Africano, ed. G. Martillotti, Milano-Napoli, 1954), and to show acquaintance with Petrach's major Latin works (e.g. Rerum memorandum libri (ed. G. Billanovich, Florence, 1945), De secreto conflictu curarum mearum, De vita solitaria, Epistolae familiares (in F. Petrarca, Prose, ed. G. Martillotti, P.G. Ricci, E. Carrara, E. Bianchi, Milano-Napoli, 1955)).

or (d) Procopius, with special study of Bellum Persicum 1.24, 2.22-3; Bellum Gothicum 4.20, 4.29-35; Historia Arcana 6–12 (all in Dewing's Loeb edition).

(xiv) Greek Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.11].

(xv) Latin Historical Linguistics [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.12].

(xvi) Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour Moderations in Classics Course IA, paper V, VI F(1)].

(xvii) General Linguistics and Comparative Philology [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.13].

(xviii) Either (a) Greek History from 776 bc to 479 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.1].

or (b) Greek History from 479 bc to 403 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.2].

or (c) Greek History from 403 bc to 336 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.3].

or (d) Roman History from 240 bc to 133 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.4].

or (e) Roman History from 133 bc to 50 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.5].

or (f) Roman History from 49 bc to ad 54 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.6].

or (g) Roman History from ad 54 to ad 138 [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject I.7]. Note: Candidates offering any of subjects (xviii) (a)–(g) must also offer the associated translation paper set in the Honour School of Literae Humaniores.

(xix) Either (a) The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950 bc–500 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.1].

or (b) Greek Archaeology and Art c.500bc–323 bc [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.2].

or (c) The Archaeology and Art of Roman Italy in the Late Republic and Early Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.3].

or (d) Cities and Settlement in the Roman Empire [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject IV.4].

(xx) Either subject 130 or subject 131 or subject 132, as specified in Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools.

(xxi) Modern Greek Poetry [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject III.14(c)]. (This subject is available only to candidates offering subject (i), Greek Literature of the Fifth Century bc who are offering neither (xiii)(d), Procopius nor (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners.)

(xxii) Thesis. Any candidate may offer a thesis in Classics, or in a subject linking Classics and their Main Subject, in accordance with the Regulation on Theses in the regulations for the Honour School of Literae Humaniores, save that references there to the Honour School of Literae Humaniores shall be deemed to be references to the Honour School of Oriental Studies (with Classics as an Additional Language) and that the Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores shall consult the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies as appropriate.

(xxiii), (xxiv) (see introductory notes) Greek or Latin for Beginners. [Honour School of Literae Humaniores, subject V.1 and V.2, Second Classical Language]. (Candidates who offer Greek or Latin for Beginniners must offer either both subjects in Greek or both subjects in Latin.)'

20 Ibid., p. 478, l. 15, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

21 Ibid., l. 22, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

22 Ibid., l. 29, after `Arabic' insert `,Classics'.

23 Ibid., l. 31, after `Hebrew.' insert `Candidates taking Classics may offer either (a) Biblical and Mishnaic or (b) Medieval Hebrew.'

24 Ibid., p. 479, l. 22, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

25 Ibid., l. 26, after `(ii)' insert `either (a) Questions on the content of the Old Persian texts and their historical background or (b)'.

26 Ibid., l. 35, after `offering' insert `Classics or'.

27 Ibid., after l. 39 insert:

`For candidates offering Classics as main subject:

3. Prepared texts, with questions on contents.'

28 Ibid., l. 40, after `Arabic' insert `, Classics'.

29 Ibid., p. 480, after l. 15 insert:

`Sanskrit (for candidates offering Classics as main subject). The following papers will be set:

1. Sanskrit unprepared translation.

2.Questions on Sanskrit language and literature.

3. Prepared texts, with general questions.

(Lists of texts available from the Oriental Institute).'

(b) Honour School of Oriental Studies (Hebrew)

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 459, delete ll. 8–10 and substitute:

`Candidates offering Hebrew shall take one of the following courses:

Course I : Candidates will be examined in accordance with the regulations set out below.

Course II : Candidates will be examined in accordance with the regulations set out below. Candidates offering Hebrew Course II as their main subject will be required to spend a period of at least one academic year on an approved course of language study in Israel.'

2 Ibid., p. 467, after l. 39 insert: `Either, for Hebrew only,'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 40–2 and substitute:

`Candidates for Course I will be required to offer nine papers. Candidates for Course II will be required to offer nine papers, a compulsory Special Subject, and an oral examination. They will be expected to carry out during their year abroad such work as the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies may require. This will include two substantial essays or a dissertation not exceeding 15,000 words, in addition to such programmes of reading and written work in preparation for the examination as their tutors/the Oriental Studies Board may prescribe.

1. (for Course I ): Hebrew composition and unprepared translation.

(for Course II ): Essay in modern Hebrew and unprepared translation.'

4 Ibid., p. 468, delete ll. 5–8 and substitute:

`10. (for Course I): Candidates who so desire may offer any special subject as may be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies. Applications for the approval of options must be submitted to the board not later than Monday of the second week of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination. (for Course II): Candidates shall offer a special subject, to be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies. Applications for the approval of options must be submitted to the board not later than Monday of the second week of the Michaelmas Term preceding the examination.'

5 Ibid., after l. 8, insert: `11. (for Course II) Spoken Hebrew. [2]

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(c) Pass School of Oriental Studies

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 481, l. 6, delete `Candidates must offer six papers in one of the' and substitute `(a) Candidates not offering Classics as their main subject must offer six papers in one of the other'.

2 Ibid., after l. 19 insert:

`(b) Candidates offering Classics as their main subject must offer either two or three of the subjects prescribed for Classics as a main subject in the Honour School of Oriental Studies (including at least one of (i) and (v)), subject to the restrictions there placed upon choice of subjects; and in addition either all three or two (as the case may be) of the papers prescribed for one of the additional languages that may be offered with Classics in the Honour School, subject in the latter case to the approval of the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies.'

3 Ibid., p. 481, l. 20, before `All' insert `(c)'.

4 Ibid., l. 23, before `All' insert `(d)'.

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6 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

Honour School of Natural Science (Metallurgy and Science of Materials)

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 446, l. 2, after `Supplementary Subjects' insert `, or who have completed an approved course of instruction in a foreign language,'.

2 Ibid., after l. 33 insert: `5. A candidate may, as an alternative to offering one or more Supplementary Subjects, take a course of instruction in a foreign language. A candidate proposing to be assessed on competence in a foreign language must have the proposal approved by the Chairman of the Sub-faculty of Materials or deputy, and by the Director of the Langauge Centre or deputy.'

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7 Committee for Archaeology

(a) M.St. in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 672, after l. 8 insert `Candidates admitted in Michaelmas Term 1996 may take the examination according to the 1995 regulations .'

2 Ibid, pp. 672–3, delete ll. 18–50 and ll. 1–11, and substitute:

`4. The written examination shall comprise three subjects:

(a) one subject on a period selected from Schedule A below, to be examined by written paper;

(b) two subjects selected from Schedules A–C. [Not more than one subject may normally be taken from Schedule C.] Each of these subjects may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays (each of 5,000 words) or by written paper.

In lieu of one of the subjects in (b) above, candidates may offer, with the permission of the committee, a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter but including notes and appendices). The subject for the dissertation will normally be chosen from the range of the periods or subjects chosen under 4(a) and (b) above, and must be approved by the candidate's supervisor. The proposed title of the dissertation must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Two copies typed or printed (the second may be a photocopy) in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper and bound simply or filed securely, must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Dissertation for the M.St. in Classical Archaeology' to the Clerk of Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the dissertation with the Clerk of the Schools.

Schedule A: Periods

Aegean to 1100
Dark Age, 1200–700
Archaic, 800–480
Classical, 500–300
Hellenistic, 330–30
Late Republican, 200–30 bc
Early Imperial, 30 bc–ad 120
Middle Imperial, ad 70–250
Late Roman, 250–700
Byzantine, 600–1453

Schedule B: Subjects

Archaeology of the Early Greek Polis
Greek architecture
Greek sculpture
Greek vase-painting
Greek burial customs
Anatomy and the Figure in Greek Art
History of Collecting Classical Antiquities
Greek coinage
Myth in Greek art
Greek and Roman wallpainting
Classical and Hellenistic portraits
Art and Cities of Roman Asia
Historical narrative in Hellenistic and Roman Art
Roman portraits
Roman sculpture
Roman architecture
Roman coinage
Topography of Ancient Rome
Archaeology of the Roman Economy
Pompeii and Ostia
Roman North Africa
Cities and Settlement in the Roman Empire
Landscape Archaeology in the Greek and Roman World
Late Roman and Byzantine painting and mosaic
Late Roman and Byzantine architecture
Late Roman and Byzantine minor arts
Late Roman and Byzantine trade
Late Roman and Byzantine coins and seals
Problems of method in ancient art-history
Theory and Method in Greek and Roman archaeology

Schedule C: Other subjects

Any subject offered in the M.St. in Byzantine Studies, Classical Literature, European Archaeology, Greek and Roman History, History of Art, Near Eastern Archaeology, Women's Studies, World Archaeology.

Candidates may apply for other subjects, to be approved by the committee, which shall define their scope and inform both the candidate and the examiners of this definition in writing.

Not all subjects may be available in any one year.'

3 Ibid., p. 673, delete ll. 14–15 and substitute:

`6. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.'

4 Ibid., p. 673, l. 16, delete `Options to be offered by candidates,' and substitute `The period and subjects to be offered by candidates and their chosen method of examination,'.

5 Ibid., p. 673, l. 20 insert:

`8. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of one or two written examinations (as specified in 4 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed'.

6 Ibid., l. 21, renumber existing paragraph 8 as 9.

(b) M.Phil. in Classical Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 569, delete l. 38 and substitute `Candidates admitted in Michaelmas Term 1996 may take the examination according to the 1995 regulations .'

2 Ibid., pp. 570–1, delete ll. 4–42 and ll. 1–15, and substitute:

`4. All candidates are required:

(a) to satisfy the examiners in a Qualifying Examination identical with that for the degree of Master of Studies in Classical Archaeology and governed by regulations 4–8 for that degree, in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which their name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students;

(b) to deliver to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students, a thesis [3] of not more than 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and any descriptive catalogue or other factual matter, but including notes and appendices) on the subject approved in accordance with regulations 7 and 10 below;

(c) to present themselves for written examination in accordance with regulation 5 below in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students;

(d) to present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

5. The written examination shall comprise one subject chosen from Schedules A–C for the Master of Studies in Classical Archaeology. [Candidates who offered a subject from Schedule C in the qualifying examination may not normally offer another subject from Schedule C.] The subject may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays of 5,000 words each, or by a written paper.'

3 Ibid., p. 571, l. 19, delete `chosen from the range of the period or subjects' and substitute `related to the period or subject'.

4 Ibid., p. 571, l. 23 and line 26, delete `the period and subjects' and substitute `the period or subject'.

5 Ibid., p. 571, l. 24, delete `eighth week of the Michaelmas Term' and substitute `eighth week of the Trinity Full Term'.

6 Ibid., p. 571, l. 29, insert:

`9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of the written examination (as specified in 5 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.'

7 Ibid., p. 571, renumber existing paragraphs 9–13 as 10–14.

8 Ibid., p. 571, l. 30, delete `first week' and substitute `eighth week'.

9 Ibid., p. 571, after l. 47 insert:

`15. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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(c) M.St. in European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 677, after l. 9 insert: `European Archaeology

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course, which may include their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for three terms a course of instruction in European Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year of their admission, unless it shall have been extended by the committee.

4. The written examination shall comprise three subjects;

(a) one subject selected from Schedules A–B to be examined by written paper;

(b) two further subjects selected from Schedules A–B. [Not more than one subject of the three selected may normally be taken from Schedule B.] Each of these subjects may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays (each of 5,000 words) or by written paper.

In lieu of one of the subjects in (b) above, candidates may offer, with the permission of the committee, a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter but including notes and appendices). The subject for the dissertation will normally be chosen from the range of subjects chosen under 4(a) and (b) above, and must be approved by the candidate's supervisor. The proposed title of the dissertation must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Two copies typed or printed (the second may be a photocopy) in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper and bound simply or filed securely, must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Dissertation for the M.St. in European Archaeology' to the Clerk of Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the dissertation with the Clerk of the Schools.

Schedule A: Main subjects

Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Europe
Neolithic and Bronze Age Europe
Aegean Archaeology to 1100
The Greeks and the Mediterranean World c.950–500 bc
The transformation of the Celtic World 500 bc–ad 100
Cities and settlements in the Roman Empire
The Archaeology of Roman Italy
Western Europe in the early Middle Ages: 400–900 ad
Late Roman and early Byzantine Archaeology ad 284–700
Byzantium: the transition from Antiquity to the Middle Ages ad 500–1100
Themes in Archaeological Science

Schedule B: Related Subjects

Any subject offered in the M.St. in World Archaeology or Classical Archaeology.

Candidates may apply for other subjects to be approved by the committee, which shall define their scope and inform both the candidate and the examiners of this definition in writing. Not all course options may be available in any given year.

5. Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography, so far as they are concerned with their subjects.

6. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

7. The subjects to be offered by the candidates and their chosen method of examination, duly approved by their supervisors, must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Notice of options to be offered by candidates must be given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the eighth week of that same term.

8. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of one or two written examinations (as specified in 4 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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(d) M.Phil. in European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 598, after l. 5 insert:

`European Archaeology

The regulations made by the Committee for Archaeology are as follows:

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course which may include their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for six terms a course of instruction in European Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse from the Register of M.Phil. students on the last day of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered in it, unless the committee decides otherwise. 4. All candidates are required:

(a) to satisfy the examiners in a Qualifying Examination identical with that for the degree of Master of Studies in European Archaeology and governed by regulations 4–8 for that degree, in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which their name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students;

(b) to deliver to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students, a thesis [4] of not more than 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and any descriptive catalogue or other factual matter, but including notes and appendices) on the subject approved in accordance with regulations 7 and 10 below;

(c) to present themselves for written examination in accordance with regulation 5 below in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students;

(d) to present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

5. The written examination shall comprise one subject chosen from Schedules A–B for the Master of Studies in European Archaeology. [Candidates who offered a subject from Schedule B in the qualifying examination may not normally offer another subject from Schedule B.] The subject may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays of 5,000 words each, or by a written paper.

6. The choice of subjects for thesis and examination must be approved by the candidate's supervisor and by the committee, having regard to the candidate's previous experience and to the availability of teaching. The subject for the thesis will normally be related to the subject chosen under regulation 5 above.

7. Candidates will be expected to show sufficient general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography for a proper understanding of their subjects.

8. The subject for examination must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. students. Notice of the subject must be given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of the written examination (as specified in 5 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisors. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

10. The proposed thesis title must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students.

11. Candidates will normally be expected to undertake a programme of relevant practical work (e.g. excavation, travel, or museum study), to be approved by their supervisors beforehand.

12. Candidates are advised that adequate reading knowledge of an appropriate language or languages (other than English) may be necessary to reach the standard required by the examiners.

13. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis with the Clerk of the Schools. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Ashmolean Library or the Balfour Library, as directed by the examiners. Such candidates will be required to complete a form stating whether they give permission for their thesis to be consulted.

14. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by candidates is not of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of M.Phil. but that nevertheless their work is of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of Master of Studies in European Archaeology, candidates shall be given the option of resitting the M.Phil. examination under the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. vi, 2, cl. 4 or of being granted permission to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies.

15. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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(e) M.St. in World Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 709, after l. 36 insert:

`World Archaeology

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course, which may include their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for three terms a course of instruction in World Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year of their admission, unless it shall have been extended by the committee.

4. The written examination shall comprise three subjects:

(a) one subject selected from Schedules A–B below to be examined by written paper;

(b) two further subjects selected from Schedules A–B [Not more than one subject of the three selected may normally be taken from Schedule B.] Each of these subjects may be examined at the candidate's choice either by two pre-set essays (each of 5,000 words) or by written paper.

In lieu of one of the subjects in (b) above, candidates may offer, with the permission of the committee, a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words (excluding bibliography and descriptive catalogue or similar factual matter but including notes and appendices). The subject for the dissertation will normally be chosen from the range of subjects chosen under 4(a) and (b) above, and must be approved by the candidate's supervisor. The proposed title of the dissertation must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Two copies typed or printed (the second may be a photocopy) in double spacing on one side only of A4 paper and bound simply or filed securely, must be delivered in a parcel bearing the words `Dissertation for the M.St. in World Archaeology' to the Clerk of Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the dissertation with the Clerk of the Schools.

Schedule A: Main subjects

Palaeolithic Archaeology
The Archaeology of colonialism: prehistoric and recent
Hunter-gatherers past and present in a world perspective
African hunter-gatherers
African farming and states
Regional studies in Australian and Pacific prehistory
Chinese Archaeology
The formation of the Islamic World
Archaeological method and theory

Schedule B: Related subjects

Any subject offered in the M.St. in European Archaeology or Classical Archaeology.

Candidates may apply for other subjects to be approved by the committee, which shall define their scope and inform both the candidate and the examiners of this definition in writing. Not all course options may be available in any given year.

5. Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography, so far as they are concerned with their subjects.

6. Candidates must present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

7. The subjects to be offered by the candidates and their chosen method of examination, duly approved by their supervisors, must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination. Notice of options to be offered by candidates must be given to the Registrar not later than Friday of the eighth week of that same term.

8. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of one or two written examinations (as specified in 4 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisor. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

9. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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(f) M.Phil. in World Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 657, after l. 25 insert:

`World Archaeology

The regulations made by the Committee for Archaeology are as follows:

1. Candidates for admission must apply to the Committee for Archaeology. They will be required to produce evidence of their appropriate qualifications for the proposed course including their suitable proficiency in relevant ancient or modern languages.

2.Candidates must follow for six terms a course of instruction in World Archaeology.

3. The registration of candidates will lapse from the Register of M.Phil. students on the last day of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered in it, unless the committee decides otherwise. 4. All candidates are required:

(a) to satisfy the examiners in a Qualifying Examination identical with that for the degree of Master of Studies in World Archaeology and governed by regulations 4–8 for that degree, in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which their name is first entered on the Register of M.Phil. students;

(b) to deliver to the Clerk of the Schools, High Street, Oxford, not later than noon on the Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term in the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students, a thesis1 of not more than 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and any descriptive catalogue or other factual matter, but including notes and appendices) on the subject approved in accordance with regulations 7 and 10 below;

(c) to present themselves for written examination in accordance with regulation 5 below in the Trinity Full Term of the academic year after that in which their name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students;

(d) to present themselves for an oral examination as required by the examiners.

5. The written examination shall comprise one subject chosen from schedules A–B for the Master of Studies in World Archaeology. [Candidates who offered a subject from Schedule B in the qualifying examination may not normally offer another subject from Schedule B.] The subject may be examined, at the candidate's choice, either by two pre-set essays of 5,000 words each, or by a written paper.

6. The choice of subjects for thesis and examination must be approved by the candidate's supervisor and by the committee, having regard to the candidate's previous experience and to the availability of teaching. The subject for the thesis will normally be related to the subject chosen under regulation 5 above.

7. Candidates will be expected to show sufficient general knowledge of Ancient History and Geography for a proper understanding of their subjects.

8. The subject for examination must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the academic year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students. Notice of the subject must be given to the Registrar no later than Friday of the eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examination.

9. Candidates intending to offer pairs of pre-set essays in place of the written examination (as specified in 5 above) will select essay topics from a list offered by their supervisors. The proposed titles of the essays must be submitted for approval to the committee in time for its meeting in eighth week of the Michaelmas Full Term preceding the examinations. Candidates must submit their essays by not later than noon on Monday of the fifth week of Trinity Full Term, to the Examination Schools. Essays must be typed or printed.

10. The proposed thesis title must be submitted for approval by the committee in time for its meeting in the eighth week of the Trinity Full Term of the year in which the candidate's name is first entered on the Register for M.Phil. Students.

11. Candidates will normally be expected to undertake a programme of relevant practical work (e.g. excavation, travel, or museum study), to be approved by their supervisors beforehand.

12. Candidates are advised that adequate reading knowledge of an appropriate language or languages (other than English) may be necessary to reach the standard required by the examiners.

13. Candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis with the Clerk of the Schools. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one copy of the thesis in the Ashmolean Library or the Balfour Library, as directed by the examiners. Such candidates will be required to complete a form stating whether they give permission for their thesis to be consulted.

14. If it is the opinion of the examiners that the work done by candidates is not of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of M.Phil. but that nevertheless their work is of sufficient merit to qualify them for the degree of Master of Studies in World Archaeology, candidates shall be given the option of resitting the M.Phil. examination under the provisions of Ch. VI, Sect. vi, 2, cl. 4, or of being granted permission to supplicate for the degree of Master of Studies.

15. The examiners may award a distinction for excellence in the whole examination.'

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(g) M.St. in Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1997

In Examination Decrees, 1995, pp. 664–6, delete ll. 43–5, ll. 1–49 and ll. 1–23 (i.e. the first to the twenty-third lines of that page, on which the numbers printed in the 1995 edition are incorrect).

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() M.St. in Prehistoric and European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1997

In Examination Decrees, 1995, pp. 697–8, delete ll. 35–51 and ll. 1–23.

(i) M.Phil. in Prehistoric and European Archaeology

With effect from 1 October 1998

In Examination Decrees, 1995, pp. 638–40, delete ll. 38–50, ll. 1–37 and ll. 1–5.

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8 Standing Committee for EEM and Related Schools

(a) Honour School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 174, delete ll. 35–9 and substitute:

`Accounting and Finance

The role and nature of accounting. Financial reporting and its regulation. Accounting for management decisions and control. Discounted cash flow and capital project appraisal. Financial planning, financial performance and treasury management. Current issues in accounting and finance.'

(b) Pass School of Economics and Management

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 177, l. 16, delete `Accounting and Control' and substitute `Accounting and Finance'.

Footnotes

[1] Persons who have satisfied the Moderators in Honour Moderations or the Preliminary Examination in Classics may not offer Classics as an additional language without permission from the Board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies in consultation with the Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores. Such permission, which will be given only for special reasons, must be sought as early as possible, and in no case later than noon on the Friday of the First Week of Michaelmas Term before the examination, by writing to the Chairman of the board of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, c/o University Offices, Wellington Square. Applications must be accompanied by a letter of support from the applicant's society.

Applicants for such permission must state which Course they offered in the First Public Examination. Those who satisfied the Moderators in Course IA, IB, or IC will not be allowed to offer subject (xi), Homer, Iliad, (xii), Virgil, Aeneid, or (xxiii), (xxiv), Greek or Latin for Beginners, and may offer only version (i) of subject (viii)(a), (b), or (c). Those who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIA will not be allowed to offer subject (xii), Virgil, Aeneid or to offer subject (xxiii), (xxiv) in Latin. Those who satisfied the Moderators in Course IIB will not be allowed to offer subject (xi), Homer, Iliad or to offer subject (xxiii), (xxiv) in Greek. Subject (xvi), Historical Linguistics and Comparative Philology may not be offered by candidates who offered it in the First Public Examination.
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[2] See the general regulation following Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 4, concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded (i) that two copies are required but that one of these may be a reproduction or carbon copy of the other, provided that any maps, diagrams, or other illustrations in the second copy are adequately reproduced, (ii) that the copy of the thesis deposited in the Ashmolean Library shall be the one containing the original illustrations, and (iii) that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may be subsequently incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil.
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[3] See the general regulation following Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 4, concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded (i) that two copies are required but that one of these may be a reproduction or carbon copy of the other, provided that any maps, diagrams, or other illustrations in the second copy are adequately reproduced, (ii) that the copy of the thesis deposited in the Ashmolean or the Balfour Library shall be the one containing the original illustrations, and (iii) that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may be subsequently incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil.
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[4] See the general regulation following Ch. VI, Sect. vi, § 4, concerning the preparation and dispatch of theses. Candidates are reminded (i) that two copies are required but that one of these may be a reproduction or carbon copy of the other, provided that any maps, diagrams, or other illustrations in the second copy are adequately reproduced, (ii) that the copy of the thesis deposited in the Ashmolean or the Balfour Library shall be the one containing the original illustrations, and (iii) that work submitted for the Degree of M.Phil. may be subsequently incorporated in a thesis submitted for the Degree of D.Phil.
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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF MEDICINE

The Board of the Faculty of Physiological Sciences has granted leave to J.M. PATTISON, Merton, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
The evidence submitted by the candidate was entitled: `Aspects of the function and regulation of the human chemokine RANTES'.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

P.R. ROMANO, St Hugh's: `Cell-specific expression of the multidrug resistance genes'.
Department of Human Anatomy, Friday, 3 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.A.R. Boyd, W.H. Colledge.

P.A. WILLIAMS, Christ Church: `Time-resolved structural studies on macromolecules'.
Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Wednesday, 1 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D. Richardson, L.N. Johnson.

J.L. WOOD, University: `The role of pH signalling in stomatal responses'.
Department of Plant Sciences, Wednesday, 1 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A.M. Hetherington, J.A.C. Smith.

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English Language and Literature

C. MONK, Linacre: `Transition magazine and the development and transmission of Modernism'.
St Cross Building, Friday, 3 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: J.L. Fuller, L. Kelly.

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Mathematical Sciences

C.G. NOON, Corpus Christi: `Secondary frost heave in freezing soils'.
Dartington House, Friday, 17 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J.R. Ockendon, J.T. Holden.

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Physical Sciences

S.P. JEWSON, Exeter: `Modelling intermediate-term climate variability'.
Department of Physics, Wednesday, 8 May, 2.15 p.m.
Examiners: T.N. Stockdale, D.G. Andrews.

M. KYLE, Corpus Christi: `An investigation of photolithographic silver particles on alumina'.
Department of Materials, Tuesday, 30 April, 10 a.m.
Examiners: M.L. Jenkins, J.R. Fryer.

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Physiological Sciences

GUO-GUANG DU, Worcester: `The role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ atpase in the regulation of intracellular calcium'.
University Laboratory of Physiology, Saturday, 27 April, 9.30 a.m.
Examiners: J.C. Ellory, C.L.-H. Huang.

K. KIRK, Wolfson: `Transport of organic solutes via anion-selective channels'.
Department of Human Anatomy, Thursday, 2 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: C.A.R. Boyd, R. Motais.

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Social Studies

C. LUPI, Linacre: `Models of non-stationary economic time series'.
Examination Schools, Wednesday, 15 May, 2.30 p.m.
Examiners: A. Banerjee, S.J. Leybourne.

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