Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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APPOINTMENT OF EXAMINERS

The following have been appointed:

SECOND PUBLIC EXAMINATION

Honour School

Oriental Studies

Egyptology with Coptic

R.B. PARKINSON, MA, D.PHIL., Queen's

For Trinity Term 1996

EXAMINATIONS OPEN TO NON-MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY

Master of Theology (except at Westminster College)

C.C. ROWLAND, MA, D.PHIL., Queen's
P.S. FIDDES, MA, D.PHIL., Regent's Park

Both from Hilary Term 1996 to Hilary Term 1997

J.D. WEAVER, MA, Regent's Park
D.G. MOSS, MA, St Anne's
J. ROSE (M.SC. Surrey)
G.W. WOOLFENDEN, MA status, Ripon College, Cuddesdon
R.J. COGGINS, BD, MA, Exeter

All from Hilary Term 1996 to Hilary Term 1999

Note. In the periods of office shown above reference to any term should be understood as indicating the first day of Full Term.

APPOINTMENT OF MODERATOR pro hac vice

The Vice-Chancellor and Proctors have appointed D.S. RICHARDS, MA, Fellow of St Cross College as a Moderator in Arabic for the Preliminary Examination in Oriental Studies to be held in Trinity Term 1996 pro hac vice (vice Dr R.C. Ostle, granted leave of absence).

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ANNUAL ELECTIONS OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS OF FACULTIES

Board of the Faculty of Clinical Medicine (7 June)

The following nominations have been duly received by 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 14 May (the closing date for nominations by two electors):

Official Members

1. D.H. BARLOW, MA, Nuffield Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

2. J.I. BELL, MA, Nuffield Professor of Clinical Medicine

Nominated by:

P. Foëx, Pembroke
P.J. Morris, Balliol

3. A.J. BRON, MA, Margaret Ogilvie's Reader in Ophthalmology

Nominated by:

J.J. Harding
J.M. Tiffany, St Cross

Ordinary Members

1. A.H. THOMSON, MA status

Nominated by: D.B. Dunger
A. Wilkinson, All Souls

2. D.A. WARRELL, MA, D.SC., DM, Fellow of St Cross

Nominated by:

B.J. Britton, Green College
J.M. Holt, Linacre

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Election of one official member

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill a vacancy for an official member (vice Professor G.K. Radda, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

The following nomination has been duly received by the closing date for nominations by two electors (published in Gazette of 13 June):

P.C. NEWELL, MA, Head of Biochemistry Department elect

Nominated by:

G.K. Radda, Merton
K.E. Davies, Keble

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY

Election of one ordinary member

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill a vacancy for an ordinary member (vice Dr J.M. Wormald, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

The following nomination has been duly received by the closing date for nominations by two electors (published in Gazette of 13 June):

J.H. HOWARTH, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Nominated by:

M.J. Ingram, Brasenose
J.M. Wormald, St Hilda's

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Election of one ordinary member

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill a vacancy for an ordinary member (vice Dr J.F. Morris, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Election of two ordinary members

An election will be held on Thursday, 27 June to fill two vacancies for ordinary members (vice Miss G.R. Peele and Dr M.F.E. Philp, resigned), to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997.

Nominations in writing by two electors will be received by the Secretary of Faculties at the University Offices up to 4 p.m. on Monday, 3 June, and nominations by six electors up to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, 18 June.

The following nominations have been duly received by the closing date for nominations by two electors (published in Gazette of 13 June):

M.E. CEADEL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College
I.S. MCLEAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Nuffield

Nominated by:

M.F.E. Philp, Oriel
T. Smith, St Hilda's

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1996

Preliminary Examinations

Modern History and Modern Languages (Part I, Modern Languages): A.R. GOODDEN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Modern History and Modern Languages (Part II, Modern History): D.A. PARROTT, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College

Modern Languages: A.R. GOODDEN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Oriental Studies: M.A. COLLIER, MA, Fellow of All Souls

Philosophy and Modern Languages: A.R. GOODDEN, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology: I.D. THOMPSON, MA, Student of Christ Church

Theology: J.F. ASHTON, MA, D.LITT., Fellow of Wolfson

Honour Moderations

Music: D.E. OLLESON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Merton (address: Music Faculty)

Oriental Studies: B.W.F. POWELL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Keble (address: Oriental Insitute)

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Second Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine

Year 3: J.I. BELL, DM (address: Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital)

Master of Philosophy

Qualifying Examination in International Relations: S.K. HAZAREESINGH, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Balliol

Qualifying Examination in Management Studies: L.P. WILLCOCKS, MA, Fellow of Templeton

Qualifying Examination in Politics:] m.f.e. philp, ma, m.phil., Fellow of Oriel

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Master of Studies

Oriental Studies: M.D. GOODMAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Wolfson (address: Oriental Institute)

Certificates

Foundation Certificates in English Language and Literature, first and second year: D.S. DE C. GRYLLS, Fellow of Kellogg

Foundation Certificate in Social and Political Science, first and second year: P.D. DAVIES, MA, M.LITT., FELLOW OF KELLOGG

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

With the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and committees will come into effect on 7 June.

1 Board of the Faculty of Theology

M.St. in the Study of Religion

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 703, after l. 35 insert:

`Study of Religion

1 Each candidate will be required to follow a course of instruction for three terms and present himself or herself for examination in three subjects as set out in the syllabus.

2 Candidates intending to offer a 10,000-15,000 word essay should make a written application for approval for the essay topic

(and, where required in the regulations, for permission to substitute the essay for a paper) to arrive at the Graduate Studies Office not later than the Monday of fifth week in Hilary Term. In cases where there is some doubt about the acceptability of the proposal candidates are asked to submit their applications earlier if possible. All applications should be accompanied by a recommendation from the supervisor. The essay must be typewritten and sent to the Chairman of Examiners for the Degree in M.St. in the Study of Religion, c/o the Clerk to the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, either at least fourteen days before the first day of the examination or at least twenty eight days before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term following the examination. Candidates intending also to offer three short essays in place of an examination paper must give notice of their intention not later than the Monday of fifth week in Hilary Term. They must submit their essays at least fourteen days before the day of the examination.

3 Each candidate will be required to present himself or herself for an oral examination unless individually dispensed by the examiners.

4 The oral examination shall be held at two points in the year: within three weeks after the written examination for those candidates who submit 10,000-15,000 word essays before the examination or who do not submit such essays, and in the last week of September or the first week in October for those who submit such essays at the end of the Long Vacation. Candidates must notify examiners of their intention to submit early or late when seeking approval of their essay topic. [The examiners may make the marks awarded to candidates known to the Director of Graduate Studies where they need to be known for the purpose of grant applications, but the pass list shall be issued following the completion of the whole examination in September or October.]'

SYLLABUS

Candidates shall offer three papers:

1. The Nature of Religion

2 and 3. Two papers selected from papers on the major texts and doctrines of (a) Buddhism, (b) Christianity, (c) Islam, (d) Judaism, or (e) any other paper that may from time to time be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Theology.

Candidates who have degree qualifications which include a study of a particular religious tradition may not offer that tradition as one of their papers.

An essay of 10,000-15,000 words may be offered in place of one paper.

The Nature of Religion

The aim of this paper is to examine the main classical and contemporary approaches to the study of religions, the problems involved in comparative study of religions, and the relation between religious belief, theology and the study of religions.

1. Students should know the work of key figures in the study of religions, the main attempts to define religion and the problems of defining religion. The works of J.G. Frazer (The Golden Bough), Edward Tylor, Rudolf Otto, Evans-Pritchard and Cantwell Smith are important in this respect.

2. They should be aware of the differing approaches to the study of religion in phenomenology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy and theology. By the use of examples, the strengths and limits of each approach should be investigated.

3. They should be aware of the major explanations that have been offered of religious belief, particularly by Durkheim, Freud, Feuerbach and Jung, and of the problems in giving such general explanations.

4. They should be aware of some major authors who have attempted comparative studies in religion, and the problems of such comparative studies. They should be aware of some of the issues involved in claims for religious truth and rationality, and attitudes to religious conflict and diversity. Relevant authors for study would be John Bowker, Ninian Smart, John Hick, Paul Knitter and Max Müller.

They should have sufficient data to take an informed view of the place of religion in the modern world.

The subject is to be studied by the use of texts from amongst the following:

Friedrich Schleiermacher, Speeches on Religion (CUP, 1988).
Rudolf Otto, The Idea of the Holy (Penguin, 1959).
Eric Sharpe, Understanding Religion (Duckworth, 1983).
Ninian Smart, The Phenomenon of Religion (Macmillan 1973).
Ian Markham, A Reader in World Religions (Macmillan 1995).
John Hinnells, New Dictionary of Religions (Penguin 1995).
Emile Durkheim, Elementary Forms of Religious Life (Allen and Unwin 1967).
Max Weber, The Sociology of Religion (Boston, Beacon Press, 1956).
E.E. Evans-Pritchard, Theories of Primitive Religion (Clarendon Press, 1965).
Sigmund Freud, The Future of an Illusion, and Totem and Taboo (in Complete Works, Hogarth Press, 1927 and 1913, respectively).
Sir James Fraser, The Golden Bough (abridged, Macmillan 1922) William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience (Collins 1960).
J. Waardenburg, Classical Approaches to the Study of Religion (Mouton, 1973).
Frank Whaling, Contemporary Approaches to the Study of Religion (Mouton, 1984).
G. Van der Leeuw, Religion in Essence and Manifestation (Harper and Row, 1967).
John Hick, An Interpretation of Religion (Macmillan, 1989).
Paul Knitter, No Other Name? (SCM, 1985).
John Bowker, The Sense of God (SCM, 1987).
Wilfred Cantwell Smith, The Meaning and End of Religion (Harper and Row, 1962).

(a) Buddhism

The earliest Buddhist doctrine and practice will be studied against the background of the early Upanishads and other religious movements in north-east India round the 5th century BCE. Practice includes both meditation and monastic life. The primary source is the Pali Canon supplemented by the commentarial literature of the Theravadin tradition.

(b) Christianity

The major themes of Christian theology will be considered in their historical context and with special reference to their use by twentieth-century theologians.

Texts:

(a) Augustine, The City of God, selected passages (Everyman 1957).
Anselm, Cur Deus Homo? (St Anselm: Basic Writings, Open Court, 1962).
Aquinas, Summa Theologiae, selected passages (Greyfriars, 1964-).
Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion, selected passages (Eerdmans, 1989).
Schleiermacher, The Christian Faith (T. and T. Clark, 1989) Rahner, Foundations of Christian Belief (Darton, Longman and Todd, 1978).
Barth, Church Dogmatics 2,1 (T. and T. Clark, 1937).

(b) Deuteronomy and the Gospel of Matthew, either in the original or in translation.

(c) Islam

The paper will consist of a broad introduction to Islamic history and religion from the Prophet Muhammad to the modern period, with particular emphasis on the formative period (7th to the 11th century, CE).

Candidates will cover the following topics in lectures and tutorials:

1. Muhammad and the Arabian milieu

2. Qur'an

3. Hadith

4. Law

5. Theology

6. Sects

7. Sufism

8. Islam and other monotheisms

9. Modern Islam

(d) Judaism

Jewish religion and thought since 70 CE with reference both to its historical development and to Judaism in the modern world.

Selections from the texts below will be assigned by the course tutor not later than the beginning of Michaelmas Term:

MISHNA: tractate Berakhot
MEKHILTA: on the Ten Commandments
Twersky, I. (ed.) A Maimonides Reader. (New York: Berhrman House, 1972.)

Other recommended books

Urbach, E.E. tr. I. Abrahams. The Sages. (Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press. 1987.)
Saadia Gaon. The Book of Beliefs and Opinions, tr. Samuel Rosenblatt. (New Haven: Yale University Press and London: Oxford University Press, 1948.)
Scholem, Gershom G., Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism. (New York: Schocken Books, 1954.)
Jacobs, Louis. Principles of the Jewish Faith: An Analytical Study. (London: Vallentine, Mitchell, 1964.)
Rubenstein, Richard, After Auschwitz: history, theology and contemporary Judaism. Second ed. (Baltimore and London: John Hopkins University Press, 1992.)

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2 Committee on Continuing Education and Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

Postgraduate Certificate in Software Engineering

With effect from 1 March 1996 (for first examination in 1996)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 921, and following the regulations for the Postgraduate Certificate in Evidence-based Health Care, insert:

`Software Engineering

1. Course

(a) The course will consist of lectures, tutorials, seminars, and classes in the theory and practice of Software Engineering, together with periods of practical experience in approved work centres. The course may be taken over a period of not less than nine months, and not more than eighteen months.

(b) The subjects of the course of study will include: appropriate mathematics, specification and design, and programming.

2.Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(a) Attendance at a minimum of four short courses;

(b) Submission of four written assignments, based on modules chosen from those in the Schedule for the M.Sc. and Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering, following discussion and agreement with the academic director of the course.

The assignments under (b) will be forwarded to the examiners for consideration by such dates as the examiners shall determine and shall notify candidates.

3. Candidates may be required to attend a viva voce examination at the end of the course of studies.

4. The examiners may award a distinction to the candidates for the certificate.

5. The standing committee for the M.Sc. in Software Engineering shall have the discretion to permit any candidate to be exempted from submitting one and one only of the written assignments under 2 (b) above, provided the standing committee is satisfied that such a candidate has undertaken equivalent study, of an appropriate standard, normally at another institution of higher education.'

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3 Committee for the School of Management Studies

Master of Business Administraton

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 756, following the decree establishing the Degree of Master of Business Administration, insert:

`REGULATIONS CONCERNING THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

1. Candidates must follow for thirty-two weeks a course of instruction in Management Studies as prescribed and will, when entering the examination, be required to produce a certificate from their society to this effect. The examination will be in four parts as follows:

2.Part I: Qualifying examination

(a) The examination shall consist of one written paper. Questions will be set on the fundamental concepts and techniques of management including finance and accounting, managing services and products, people and organisations, strategic management. There will also be questions on the economic and industrial context, quantitative methods and information management.

(b) The paper shall be set and administered by the examiners appointed to examine for the MBA. It shall be held once each year, on Friday of the last week of Michaelmas Full Term.

(c) Entries must be made on the appropriate form, obtainable from the School of Management Studies by Friday of the third week of Michaelmas Full Term.

(d) Candidates who fail the examination will be permitted to retake it on one, but not on more than one subsequent occasion. A resit examination will be held at the beginning of Hilary Full Term. No candidates shall enter for Part II of the examination until he or she has already passed the Part I examination.

3. Part II: Written assignments Candidates must complete eight written assignments of no more than 4,000 words, each of which will count for assessment purposes. They must complete one assignment for no less than each of five courses which must be selected from the list of core courses detailed in Schedule A and one assignment for each of three advanced elective courses which they are required to choose from the list of such courses which will be published annually by the Deputy Director (MBA) before the last Friday of Michaelmas Term. Two copies of each assignment must be submitted to the Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o the Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford, by noon on Monday of the Eleventh Week of the Term in which the lecture course is taken. One copy of the assignment will be retained by the examiners. The other will be returned to the candidate with written comments.

4. Part III: Final examination

(a) No candidate shall enter the final examination unless he or she has already passed the qualifying examination. There shall be three written papers.

(b) One paper shall be taken in Trinity Term, and shall be on advanced electives. Candidates will be expected to answer one question from each of three sections.

(c) All candidates also must sit two general papers on Management to be taken at the end of the final session.

5. Part IV: Business project report Candidates will be required to complete to the satisfaction of the examiners an eight-week period of supervised placement in an approved organisation between the end of Trinity Full Term and the beginning of the final period of residence in September. Competence will be examined by means of reports from a candidate's placement supervisor, and from the sponsoring firm, by a report by the candidate of the period of placement, and by presentation by the candidate of the report during the final session. The report shall not exceed 15,000 words. All reports on projects must be submitted by noon on the first Monday of the final session in the year in which the Part II examination is taken. The report must be accompanied by a statement, submitted in a separate sealed envelope, that it is the candidate's own work except where otherwise indicated. The report must be addressed to the Chairman of Examiners for the MBA, c/o Clerk of the Schools, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford. Candidates must submit two copies of each project report. Successful candidates will be required to deposit one of these copies in the library of the School of Management Studies. The report will be held on a restricted access basis in view of possible commercial sensitivities.

6. Candidates may also be required to attend an oral examination which may be on one or more of the candidate's final examination, written assignments, and placement report.

7. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Degree.

SCHEDULE A

(a) Managing Financial Resources

Financial reporting and its regulations; sources of company information; structure and interpretation of financial statements; financial analysis and company valuation. Accounting for management, cost behaviour and analysis; financial planning and control systems, including performance measurement. Sources of finance and financial systems; capital structure and the cost of capital; taxation; dividend policy; investment appraisal. Portfolio theory and asset pricing models; market efficiency and anomalies; options and derivatives; mergers and takeovers.

(b) People and Organisations

Theories and concepts of organisation behaviour, industrial relations and human resource management; leadership; technology; work design; organisational change; culture; diversity; power; groups; motivation; employee involvement; collective representation; the role of trade unions; the management of human resources and industrial relations; strategies, structures, and styles; methods of job regulation; pay systems; comparative approaches to the management of employees; contemporary developments.

(c) Managing Services and Products

Concepts of products and services and the role which marketing and operations management may play in manufacturing and service organisations; the product life-cycle, the marketing of services; market analysis, marketing research and marketing information; market segmentation and positioning; the buying behaviour of individuals and organisations; direct marketing, promotion and marketing communications; pricing; product management and new product development; distribution and marketing; vertical integration and capacity investment; technological innovation; inventory management; planning and control issues; customer service and the management of product and service quality.

(d) Strategic Management

Theoretical foundations of strategic management. Structural analysis of industrial and industry dynamics. The resource and capability based view of the firm. Company and competitor analysis. Strategy and organisation. Mergers, acquisitions, and alliances. Corporate governance, stakeholder analysis and ethics. Competitive strategy in different industry environments. The nature and sources of competitive advantage and patterns of competition. Strategic change and its implementation. Strategy evaluation. Competitive and co-operative strategies. Strategic risk management. Corporate strategy and competitive advantage. International strategy and organisation including the globalisation of markets. Strategic innovation, R&D, and technology management. Strategic management in the public sector and not-for-profit organisations. Current issues in strategic management.

(e) The Economic, Social, and Political Environment

The nature and implications of economic, social, and political change and their relationship with business development. Comparative economics; demography and social change; comparative government institutions; change in international relations; corporate government relations.

(f) Business and the Law

The role of law in business. The nature of law and its operation in practice; the legal process; law and discretion. Commercial law, rights and disputes. Business regulation, enforcement and compliance. Business practice, legal advice and the role of the legal profession. International aspects of law and regulation including European law and the Single European Market.

(g) Data Analysis and Computing

Business statistics: Data, measurement, and computing, descriptive statistics; probability distribution; sampling, hypothesis testing, interval estimation; problem laboratory; worked examples in practice; testing differences in mean and proportions; test of goodness to fit; analysis of variance; linear regression; problem laboratory: worked examples in practice; multiple regression; discriminant and cluster analysis; non-parametric methods; problem laboratory: worked examples in practice.

Modelling: Quantitative models in business; linear programming, network models; heuristics; simulation; decision analysis.

Data Analysis Project: A major exercise to model and analyse business data; deliverables; project report.

MIS for Business: Introduction to information systems (soft modelling, decision modelling); information system applications (MIS, EIS, DSS); information system technology, development of user application; future of MIS; business simulation (software).

() Management Skills

The practice and where appropriate the theories of business communication and presentations, leadership and small group skills and negotiations.

(i) Industrial Organisation

The price mechanism, resource allocation, and their welfare aspects. Market structures, cost and scale economies, oligopoly, entry empirical studies of pricing and profitability, advertising, product differentiation, innovation, theories of the firm, mergers and vertical integration, public policy towards industry.

(j) Environmental Management

Impact of organisms on the environment; concept of sustainability; impact of the use of energy, conservation and efficiency; nature of pollution and pollution regulation; global scale environmental problems, international environmental agreements; waste disposal principles and concepts; corporate responsibility and environmental issues; business environmental strategies; environmental management systems; techniques of environmental management; environmental auditing, reporting, financial evaluation; current issues in environmental management.

(k) Science and Technology in Business

The study of developments in research in science and technology and their transfer from the laboratory into business. The course will take the form of a series of guest seminars on important developments in research in the University of Oxford and the ways in which research is exploited, including consideration of intellectual property rights.'

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DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF SCIENCE

The Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences has granted leave to S. FUNG, Keble, to supplicate for the Degree of Doctor of Science. A list of the evidence submitted by the candidate is available at the University Offices.

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EXAMINATIONS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The examiners appointed by the following faculty boards give notice of oral examination of their candidates as follows:

Biological Sciences

J. HUMPHRIES, Pembroke: `Ray, the father of taxonomic method'.
St Anne's, Wednesday, 5 June, 11.30 a.m.
Examiners: R.G. Lewis, M. Walters.

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English Language and Literature

D. EDWARDS, Jesus: `Keats, mythology, and the politics of sexuality'.
Somerville, Tuesday, 28 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: J. Barnard, F.J. Stafford.

Literae Humaniores

C. BRITTAIN, Balliol: `Philo of Larissa and the Fourth Academy'.
Queen's, Monday, 10 June, 4 p.m.
Examiners: S. Bobzien, D.N. Sedley.

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Oriental Studies

T.Z. HASAN, St Antony's: `The Mansolea of Uchch and Multan: a study of regional sultanate architecture 1206– 1526'.
Oriental Institute, Wednesday, 29 May, 2 p.m.
Examiners: R. Hillenbrand, M. Shokoohy.

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Physical Sciences

C.E. ALLEN, Queen's: `A computational and experimental examination of turbine cooling flows'.
Department of Engineering Science, Tuesday, 28 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: R.C. Darton, D. Lampard.

A. ROBINSON, Brasenose: `The computer simulation of lipid bilayers and biological membranes'.
Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Wednesday, 29 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: M.S.P. Sansom, D.J. Osgu Thorpe.

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Physiological Sciences

A.S. AKHA, Keble: `Signalling through the B lymphocyte antigen receptor'.
University Department of Pharmacology, Tuesday, 28 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: A. Galione, G.G.B. Klaus.

L.M. WAHL, Wolfson: `Sources of quantal variance in synaptic transmission'.
Balliol, Friday, 31 May, 11 a.m.
Examiners: S. Cull-Candy, D. Noble.

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Social Studies

P.F. COVENEY, New College: `Informal investment in Britain: an examination of the investment activities and characteristics of British business angels'.
Templeton, Tuesday, 28 May, 10.30 a.m.
Examiners: W. Wetzel, M.D. Young.

S. JOHNSON, Pembroke: `Strategies for realignment: Japanese opposition politics under a one-party dominant regime 1955–93'.
Lincoln, Friday, 7 June, 2 p.m.
Examiners: D.B. Goldey, I. Neary.

Theology

O.P. RAFFERTY, Christ Church: `The Church, the state, and the Fenian threat, 1861–75'.
Wadham, Friday, 31 May, 4 p.m.
Examiners: D. Kerr, E.J. Garnett.

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EXAMINATION FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE

The examiners appointed by the following faculty board give notice of oral examination of their candidate as follows:

Physical Sciences

N.A. MARIGHETO, Wolfson: `Optical studies of dilute magnetic semiconductors'.
Clarendon Laboratory, Tuesday, 28 May, 3.30 p.m.
Examiners: P.C. Klipstein, A.M. Glazer.

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