University Agenda

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CONGREGATION 27 May

Degree by Special Resolution

The following special resolution will be deemed to be approved at noon on 27 May, unless by that time the Registrar has received notice in writing from two or more members of Congregation under the provisions of Tit. II, Sect. vi, cl. 6 (Statutes, 1995, p. 13) that they wish the resolution to be put to a meeting of Congregation.

Text of Special Resolution

That the Degree of Master of Arts be conferred upon the following:

SEAN PAUL NEE, Lady Margaret Hall

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CONGREGATION 11 June 2 p.m.

1 Promulgation of Statutes

Explanatory note to Statute (1)

The current statute governing procedures in Congregation incorporates changes made in 1991 to enable a meeting, at which the only business due to be conducted consists of items notice of opposition to which must be given in advance, to be cancelled if such notice (or a request for adjournment) has not been received. Should a meeting nevertheless be required, either because of another item or because the Vice-Chancellor considers that an item is `of such general concern to the University as a whole that it would be inappropriate to proceed without an opportunity for further explanation or debate', then the unopposed item must be `declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put'. It has come to notice that a situation could arise in which a non-hostile amendment, acceptable to Council, was proposed (e.g. for clarificatory purposes) and in which there would then have to be a meeting of Congregation even if neither the amendment nor the substantive resolution was in any way controversial. The following statute is accordingly promoted by Council to enable a meeting of Congregation to be cancelled in such circumstances. Because of the possibility that an amendment might be intended as non-hostile by its proponents, and seen as acceptable by Council, but that other members of Congregation might object to it, the proposed change in procedure would provide for alternative arrangements: either, if the urgency of the matter permitted, receipt of an ostensibly non-hostile amendment would cause the postponement of the proceedings on the substantive resolution by at least two weeks, advance written notice would be required of opposition to the amendment, and in the absence of such notice the amended resolution would be declared carried without question put; or, alternatively, the amendment would be put to the House at the meeting at which the resolution was originally to be moved, after which the amended resolution, or the unamended resolution if the amendment failed, would be declared carried without question put (i.e. in neither case would the resolution be put to the House).

At the same time opportunity is taken to provide for Council to be able to decide, at its meeting on the afternoon of the day by noon on which advance notice of opposition to a general resolution must be given in writing, that a general resolution proposed by twelve or more members of Congregation is unacceptable to Council. Under the existing statute, it is necessary for two members of Council to give formal written notice on Council's behalf before noon (unless the timing of the submission of the resolution has enabled Council to decide two weeks previously whether or not the resolution is acceptable to Council), on the basis that this notice would be withdrawn if Council agreed subsequently that the resolution was acceptable to it after all. (The deadline for notice by two or more members of Congregation will remain as noon, since otherwise Council would not necessarily know whether there was any other opposition to the resolution.)

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(1) WHEREAS it is expedient to revise procedures in Congregation in order to enable both an unopposed general resolution and an unopposed amendment to such a resolution to be declared carried without question put, and in order to enable Council as well as members of Congregation to give formal notice of opposition to a general resolution, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. II, Sect. V (Statutes, 1995, p. 11; Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 1074), insert new cl. 6 as follows and renumber existing cll. 6–13 (pp. 11–12; pp. 1074–5) as cll. 7–14:

`6. Members of Congregation proposing an amendment under the provisions of clause 5 above shall state whether or not the amendment is in their view hostile to the general resolution (that is to say, the amendment is such that if it were not carried the proposers of the amendment would oppose the resolution). If they state that it is not hostile, and if the amendment is acceptable to Council, then Council may decide that proceedings on the resolution and on the proposed amendment thereto shall be adjourned to a meeting of Congregation held not fewer than fourteen days after the meeting at which the resolution was originally to be moved under the provisions of clause 4 above; Council may also, by publication of a notice in the University Gazette not later than the twelfth day before the meeting of Congregation to which the proceedings have been adjourned, require that any two members proposing to oppose the amendment shall give notice in writing to the Registrar to that effect not later than the eighth day before the meeting to which the proceedings have been adjourned, and such notice, if given, shall be published by the Registrar in the University Gazette not later than the fourth day before that meeting. If such notice of opposition, having been duly required, has not been given, and if Council has not decided by 4 p.m. on the eighth day before the meeting at which the resolution was originally to be moved that the proposed amendment is unacceptable to Council, or, if Council has decided that the proposed amendment is unacceptable to it, Council has not also caused a notice to that effect to be published in the University Gazette not later than the fourth day before the meeting, then the amended resolution shall, at the conclusion of proceedings on the amendment and the resolution, be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put, and the provisions of clause 7 below, and of Sect. III, cl. 10 of this Title, shall not apply to the amendment or the resolution. Alternatively, if proceedings have not been so adjourned, then, subject to the provisions of clause 7 below, the proposed amendment shall, at the conclusion of proceedings on it, be put to the House; if the amendment is carried, the amended resolution shall subsequently, be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put, while, if the amendment is rejected, the unamended resolution shall subsequently be declared by the Chairman to be carried without question put, and in neither case shall the provisions of clause 7 below, or of Sect. III, cl. 10 of this Title, apply to the resolution.'

2 Ibid., cl. 7, as renumbered, delete `clause 8' and substitute `clause 9'.

3 Ibid., cl. 9, as renumbered, after `oppose the resolution' insert `; or Council may, not later than 4 p.m. on that day, instruct the Registrar to give notice that the resolution is unacceptable to Council'.

4 Ibid., after `Such notice' insert `(whether of opposition by members of Congregation or of unacceptability to Council)'.

5 Ibid. (p. 12; p. 1074), delete `clause 6' and substitute `clause 7'.

6 Ibid., cll. 11, 12, and 13, as renumbered, in each case delete `clause 9' and substitute `clause 10'.

7 Ibid., cl. 13, as renumbered (p. 12; p. 1075), delete `clauses 5–7' and substitute `clauses 5–8'.

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Explanatory note to Statute (2) and to Special Resolution

As colleges were informed individually in Hilary Term, Council has received from Wycliffe Hall a petition for the grant of a licence as a Permanent Private Hall. Council has considered in some detail the current position of the college, including its finances and its future plans, and is satisfied that Wycliffe Hall's request is entirely appropriate. It has noted that all but one of the colleges which have commented on the proposal either support or do not object to it. Council therefore now forwards to Congregation a special resolution, as is required by statute, seeking the consent of Congregation to the grant to Wycliffe Hall of a licence as a Permanent Private Hall and to the name by which the hall is to be called. If Congregation approves the special resolution, Mr Vice-Chancellor will grant the licence with effect from 1 October 1996.

The hall has indicated that it would not wish to increase its current numbers significantly, that the primary function of the hall would continue to be preparation for the Anglican ministry, and that it would not expect to admit students for courses other than in Theology (or related subjects, e.g. joint honour schools involving Theology). The hall intends to admit under the new arrangements primarily those who are preparing for ministry or already engaged in ministry. The hall sees the achievement of Permanent Private Hall status as an enhancement and consolidation of its existing role, in that it would thereby be able to prepare candidates for degrees for which at present it could not (i.e. research degrees) and would be able to carry ministerial training to the highest level. It has also confirmed that it has no ambitions in due course to seek full collegiate status

. Within its total numbers the hall wishes to continue to admit some twenty-five ordinands who would not be presented for matriculation and would not read for any degree, diploma, or certificate of the University. These would be ordination candidates under supervision by the hall under `Bishop's Regulations' rather than any university regulations; the decision to admit them, as well as responsibility for their subsequent teaching and assessment, is the sole responsibility of the hall. In contrast, the admission of those undergraduates who would be presented for matriculation is controlled under the aegis of a committee on which the Theology Board is represented; the students are taught `tutorially' and are examined by the University. The Theology Board is also responsible for the admission of all graduate students. The hall believes, and Council has endorsed that view, that in these circumstances a reasonable case for distinction between ordination candidates and matriculated students can be made. The formal position, however, is that under the provisions of Tit. VII, Sect. VI, § 1, cl. 5 (Statutes, 1995, p. 48),

`... all statutes of the University in which mention is made generally and without distinction of colleges and other societies shall be deemed to include and apply to the members of Permanent Private Halls.'

Under Tit. XI, cl. 1 (ibid., p. 77),

`No person shall be matriculated as a member of the University unless he or she shall first have been made a member of a college or other society, and no person shall continue to be a member of a college or other society unless he or she is presented for matriculation as a member of the University within a period laid down by decree or regulation.'

The association of these two statutes constitute the current requirement that all members of a Permanent Private Hall must be presented for matriculation. Council takes the view, however, that there could be a particular justification in allowing Permanent Private Halls, unlike colleges, and given their particular mission as `religious houses', to have a `distinguishable' group within their membership who were not required to be presented for matriculation, particularly as it is thought that a number of the Permanent Private Halls currently have a body of `religious' or individuals undergoing ordination training associated with them who are not presented for matriculation. Council therefore has reviewed the existing statutory position, and the position at the individual Permanent Private Halls, in consultation with the halls, and puts forward the following statute providing for exemption from the matriculation requirement for certain categories of students, which would then be sanctioned by decree. It is expected that any such decree would set an upper limit on the number of such students and precisely define the categories of non-matriculated students who might be admitted. For its part Wycliffe Hall has confirmed that, should it be granted a licence as a Permanent Private Hall, it would be willing to introduce arrangements under which those of its members who were not presented for matriculation would be subject to Proctorial discipline, a point on which Council (and the Proctors) had expressed concern. Council would expect similar arrangements to apply at any hall granted permission to admit non-matriculated students.

If Congregation approves the special resolution, it will be necessary to amend the existing decree, Ch. V, Sect. XI (ibid., p. 349), under which Wycliffe Hall, along with the other Anglican Theological Colleges associated with the University (St Stephen's House and Ripon College, Cuddesdon), may present a certain number of qualified candidates for specified degrees and diplomas, primarily in Theology and related subjects. This decree, in any case, requires amendment because its provisions expire after 1995-6. The provision has been reviewed by the Theology Board, in consultation with the remaining two Anglican Theological Colleges associated with the University, and it is proposed in cl. 2 of the decree to be made by Council if the special resolution is approved that the provision be extended for a further five years, subject to review at the end of that period, on the same conditions as apply at present, and that the upper limits on numbers, which will now apply to St Stephen's House and Ripon College only (as effected by cl. 3 of the decree), be reduced as shown in cll. 4 and 5 of the decree.

Currently, Council fixes by decree the maximum number of home and EU undergraduates permitted to be presented for matriculation at each of the Permanent Private Halls. Wycliffe Hall has suggested the figure of fifty-five for this limit in its own case, a figure which is acceptable to Council. Cl. 6 of the decree limits this category of student to that number. There is no formal limit on the number of graduate students who may be admitted by a Permanent Private Hall. Wycliffe Hall would envisage a modest increase in the number of graduate students at the hall, primarily through its ability as a Permanent Private Hall to admit research students. (Cl. 1 of the decree removes the now otiose provision under which Wycliffe Hall is deemed to be a society of the University for the purposes of degree ceremonies.)

(2) WHEREAS it is expedient to make provision for the Permanent Private Halls to admit certain categories of student (normally non- degree candidates for ordination training) who are not presented for matriculation, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

In Tit. VII, Sect. VI, § 1, cl. 5 (Statutes, 1995, p. 48) after `members of Permanent Private Halls' insert `except as shall be determined otherwise by Council by decree'.

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Explanatory note to Statute (3)

Council has reviewed the provisions of Tit. IX, Sect. VII (Statutes, 1995, p. 68), which deals with the appointment and duties of the Registrar and other officials. As the statute is worded at present, there are two provisions which have become outmoded, to an extent reflecting the position which obtained when the Central Administration was considerably smaller than it is at present. Cl. 12 (p. 70) currently provides that, in addition to the Registrar and the five deputies to the Registrar, there shall be such other staff of the Central Administration as Council, consulting as appropriate, shall consider necessary. While Council would be likely to be consulted on the creation and/or redeployment or realignment of one of the senior posts within the Central Administration, the current mechanism by which the establishment of the Central Administration is controlled is essentially the budget, as approved by Council and the General Board on the recommendation of their joint Resources Committee. It is essential that the budget of the Central Administration should be reviewed from time to time, as with all spending sectors within the University, but Council is content that this should be done, as at present, through the Resources Committee's budgetary mechanism under which expansion may be permitted or reductions imposed. Cl. 1 of the following statute deletes the requirement for Council's approval of posts other than those of the Registrar and the five deputies to the Registrar. This is done on the understanding that the Registrar will continue as a matter of normal practice to consult Council or the Vice-Chancellor on behalf of Council on changes in senior posts (i.e. at ALC 6).

Cl. 15 (p. 71) currently provides that all staff of the Central Administration, other than the Registrar and the five deputies to the Registrar, who are appointed by Council, in consultation as appropriate with other bodies, shall be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor. Cl. 2 of the following statute deletes that requirement and provides that other staff shall be appointed as Council shall determine. As part of the current review, Council has agreed guidelines for the appointment of staff of the Central Administration which include a requirement that all appointments at ALC 6 should be subject to the Vice-Chancellor's approval.

(3) WHEREAS it is expedient to amend the current statutory provisions governing the control of the establishment of, and appointment to posts within, the Central Administration, THE UNIVERSITY ENACTS AS FOLLOWS.

1 In Tit. IX, Sect. vii (Statutes, 1995, p. 70), delete cl. 12 and substitute: `12. There shall also be five deputies to the Registrar as follows:

(a) a Secretary of the Chest;

(b) a Secretary of Faculties;

(c) a Surveyor to the University;

(d) a Deputy Registrar (Administration);

(e) a Deputy Registrar (General).'

2 Ibid., cl. 15 (p. 71), delete `The staff referred to ... Buildings Committee' and substitute `Other staff shall be appointed as Council shall determine'.

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2 Voting on Special Resolution consenting to grant of licence as a Permanent Private Hall

That this House consent to the grant of a licence as a Permanent Private Hall to Wycliffe Hall, by which name the hall shall be known.

Decree to be made by Council if the Special Resolution is approved

1 In Ch. I, Sect. I, § 1, cl. 7, concerning admission to degrees (Statutes, 1995, p. 177), after `Cuddesdon;' insert `and', and delete `; and Wycliffe Hall'.

2 In Ch. V, Sect. XI, cl. 1, concerning matriculation for theological courses (p. 349), delete `1995–6' and substitute `2000–1'.

3 Ibid., delete `Wycliffe Hall,'.

4 Ibid., delete `fifty' and substitute `thirty'.

5 Ibid., delete `thirty-six' and substitute `twenty-four'.

6 In Ch. XI, Sect. VII, concerning numbers at permanent private halls (p. 715), after the entry for St Benet's Hall insert:

`Wycliffe Hall    55'.

7 This decree shall be effective from 1 October 1996.

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CONGREGATION 19 June

1 Encaenia

Mr Vice-Chancellor invites Pro-Vice-Chancellors, Heads of Houses, Doctors of Divinity, Civil Law, Medicine, Music, Letters, and Science, the Proctors, the Assessor, the Public Orator, the Professor of Poetry, and the Registrar to partake of Lord Crewe's Benefaction to the University, meeting him in the Hall of Jesus College at 10.45 a.m. on Wednesday, 19 June. Thence they will go in procession to the Sheldonian Theatre, where will be spoken the Oration in Commemoration of the Benefactors of the University according to the intention of the Right Honourable Nathaniel, Lord Crewe, Bishop of Durham.

Note. Pro-Vice-Chancellors, Heads of Houses, and Doctors who propose to accept Mr Vice-Chancellor's invitation, and to be present in the Sheldonian Theatre, are requested to inform his Secretary at the University Offices, Wellington Square, not later than Wednesday, 12 June.

2 Honorary Degrees

Doctor of Divinity

THE RT REVD AND RT. HON. THE LORD HABGOOD, PC (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), formerly Archbishop of York

Doctor of Civil Law

HIS EXCELLENCY SIR ROBERT YEWDALL JENNINGS, QC (MA, HON. LL.D. Cambridge), formerly Whewell Professor of International Law, University of Cambridge, and formerly Judge, and President, of the International Court of Justice

Doctors of Letters

PROFESSOR WALTER BURKERT (DR.PHIL. Erlangen), Emeritus Professor of Classical Philology, University of Zürich

SIR NORMAN ROBERT FOSTER, RA, RDI, RIBA, FSCD, FAIA, architect

MRS DORIS MAY LESSING, author

PROFESSOR AMARTYA KUMAR SEN, MA (MA, PH.D. Cambridge), FBA, formerly Fellow of All Souls College and Drummond Professor of Political Economy, Professor of Economics and Philosophy and Lamont University Professor, Harvard University

Doctors of Science

PROFESSOR SIR JAMES BLACK (MB, CH.B. St Andrews), FRCP, FRS, Honorary Fellow of Wolfson College, Professor of Analytical Pharmacology, King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of London

PROFESSOR SIR GEOFFREY WILKINSON (B.SC., PH.D. London), FRS, Honorary Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall, Emeritus Professor of Inorganic Chemistry, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London

¶ Arrangements for admission to the Sheldonian Theatre, which will be by ticket only, are published in `Notices' below.