Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Honour School of Mathematics 1996

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved the following list of lecture courses for papers C1 and C2 of the Honour School of Mathematics to be examined in Trinity Term 1996 (see Examination Decrees, 1994, p. 242, regulation 7(1)(a)):

Algebraic Number Theory
Algebraic Topology
Analytic Topology
Approximation Theory
Axiomatic Set Theory
Communication Theory
Complex Algebraic Curves
Complexity and Cryptography
Decision Mathematics
Domain Theory
Elementary Number Theory
Finite Groups
Fourier Analysis
Functional Analysis
General Relativity
Generalised Linear Models in Statistics
The Gödel Incompleteness Theorems
Lattice Theory
Linear Models in Statistics
Markov Processes
Mathematical Ecology and Biology
Mathematical Models in Finance
Model Theory
Nonlinear Systems
Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations
Ordinary Differential Equations
Practical Statistics
Proof Theory
Quantum Theory
Representation Theory
Rings and Modules
Semantics of Programming Languages
Viscous Flow
Waves and Compressible Flow

The following courses from the above list will be required as theoretical background for the practical classes in Statistics (ibid., p. 243, regulation 7(3)(b)):

Statistics of Linear Models
Generalised Linear Models

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has also approved the following list of topics for the course of practical classes in Statistics for the academic year 1995–6:

Use of statistical software
Statistical summaries and graphs
Linear regression modelling
Uses of diagnostics for model checking and case screening
Selection of variables in multiple regression
Analysis of variance with data from designed experiments
Analysis of factorial effects
Approximate analyses for counts and proportions
Generalised linear modelling
Analysis of deviance
Regression models for binomial data
Log-linear models
Analysis of contingency tables
Gamma regression models

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Honour School of Mathematics 1997 and Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1997

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved the following list of lecture courses for paper b(10) of the Honour Schools of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences to be examined in Trinity Term 1997 (see Examination Decrees, 1994, pp. 252 and 261, regulation 3(c)).

Elementary Number Theory
Lattice Theory
Mathematical Ecology and Biology
Nonlinear Systems
Communication Theory
Applied Probability
Combinatorial Optimisation

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Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1997

The Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences has approved the following list of papers for examination in Section o of the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences 1997 (see Examination Decrees, 1994, p. 252, regulation 3(e)).

Paper o1: Numerical Computation (as for Paper I.6 of the Honour School of Computation).

Paper o2: Extended Essay (as described in the regulations for the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences published in Examination Decrees and Regulations).

Paper o3: Functional Programming and Algorithm Design (as for Section

4 of the regulations for Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation. [This option is not available to candidates who have taken Honour Moderations in Mathematics and Computation.]

Paper o4: Imperative Programming (as for Paper I.1 of the Honour School of Computation). Practical weight: one sixth. Paper of 2 hours 30 minutes.

Paper o5: Algorithms and Complexity (as for Paper I.5 of the Honour School of Computation).

Paper o6: History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant (Paper 101 of the regulations for Philosophy in Some of the Honour Schools). No candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering Paper b1.

Paper o7: Metaphysics and Theory of Knowledge (Paper 102 of the regulations for Philosophy in Some of the Honour Schools). No candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering Paper b1.

Paper o8: Philosophy of Mathematics (Paper 122 of the regulations for Philosophy in Some of the Honour Schools). No candidate will be permitted this option who is not offering Paper b1.

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Honour School of Computation 1997

Subjects approved for the Honour School of Computation, Trinity Term 1997:

Section II

1. Compilers and Operating Systems

2. Splines, Computer Graphics and Computational Geometry

3. Parallel Scientific Computation and Parallel Algorithms

4. Engineering and Computer Science (topics from Engineering and Computing Science paper IE2)

5. Mathematical Foundations of Programming Languages (topics from a list including Lambda Calculus and Types, Domain Theory, Semantics of Programming Languages)

6. Advanced Mathematical Logic and Complexity (topics from a list including Model Theory, Complexity, Proof Theory)

Options 1, 2 and 3 will have a 1/6 practical weight and a 2 1/2 hour examination.

Options 4, 5 and 6 will have no practicals and a 3 hour examination.

Section E

Paper a1, a2, a3, a4, a5, a6, b1, b8, and b9 from the Honour School of Mathematical Sciences together with paper b(10)(c):

Elementary Number Theory
Lattice Theory
Mathematical Ecology and Biology
Nonlinear Systems
Communication Theory
Applied Probability

There will be no practical element and each paper will be of three hours' duration.

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Honour School of Mathematics and Computation 1997

The subjects approved for Section II(MC) in the Honour School of Mathematics and Computation, Trinity Term 1997, will be the same as those for Section II of the Honour School of Computation, Trinity Term 1997.

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Honour School of Mathematics and Computation 1996

Subjects approved for papers C1(c) and C2(c) for the Honour School of Mathematics and Computation, Trinity Term 1996:

Paper C1(c)

Axiomatic Set Theory
Communication Theory
Complexity and Cryptography
Domain Theory
The Gödel Incompleteness Theorems
Lattice Theory
Neural Networks
Proof Theory
Semantics of Programming Languages

Paper C2(c)

Computer Graphics
Operating Systems
Parallel Algorithms
Programming Language Implementation
Theorem Proving
VLSI Design
Logic Programming and Learning Four questions will be set on each of these subjects, with the exception of Neural Networks for which only two questions will be set.

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JOINT COMMITTEE FOR MATHEMATICS AND PHILOSOPHY

Honour School of Mathematics and Philosophy 1996

The Joint Comittee for Mathematics and Philosophy has approved the following list of lecture courses in Advanced Logic to be examined in Trinity Term 1995 (see Examination Decrees, 1994, p. 249):

Axiomatic Set Theory
The Gödel Incompleteness Theorems
Model Theory
Proof Theory

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES

Optional Subjects in the Honour School of Modern Languages and the related Joint Honour Schools

The Board of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages gives notice, under the provisions of the regulations in Examination Decrees, 1994, p. 375, ll. 40–2, that the following Optional Subjects will be available in the examination in Trinity Term 1997.

Details of mutual exclusions are given in the footnotes. 101 The comparative descriptive linguistics of modern European languages. Candidates will be expected to have a detailed knowledge of any two of the following languages and to have made a comparative study of their present-day phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary: English, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Russian, Greek.

102 Semantics. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the principal theories in this field since 1900.

103 General Linguistics.[1] Candidates should be familiar with the terminology, methodology, and main theoretical standpoints of modern linguistics. They should be able to discuss, with reference to phonetics, phonology, grammar, and semantics, some of the following topics: linguistic units and relations; linguistic universals; communicational functions of language; language acquisition; linguistic variation and linguistic change; linguistic relativism. Opportunity will be provided for candidates to show proficiency in phonological, grammatical, and other types of analysis of given samples of linguistic material.

104 Modern Literary Theory.[2] Candidates will be expected to be familiar with major theories in this field since 1918.

105 European Cinema and Literary Movements from 1920 to the present. Candidates will be expected: (a) to show evidence of having worked on film study and analysis, using D. Bordwell and K. Thompson, Film Art, third edition (McGraw Hill, London, 1990); P. Cook, The Cinema Book (BFI, London, 1985); M. Liehm, Passion and Defiance (University of California Press, Berkeley–Los Angeles, 1984); (b) to have studied two of the following, up to four of which will be available in the examination: Expressionism and the Early Avant-garde; Realism, Socialist-Realism, Neo-Realism; Auteurism; Filmic Adaptations of Literary Texts/Literary Authors writing for the screen; Totalitarianism in Literature and Film; Surrealism; Representations of Gender and Sexuality; The New Avant-garde and Post-modern Film.

A list of the topics listed in (b) which will be available in the examination can be obtained from the Modern Languages Faculty Secretarial Office in 37 Wellington Square at the beginning of Michaelmas Full Term 1996.

200 Romance Philology and Linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show a detailed knowledge of the methods of Comparative Romance Philology and to illustrate their answers with examples from more than one Romance language. A section on 'Vulgar Latin' will be set, including passages for linguistic comment from one or more of the following: Early Glosses, Appendix Probi, Aetheriae Peregrinatio ad Loca Sancta. The section will be compulsory for candidates offering Modern Languages Paper IV in any two Romance languages, and optional for all other candidates, with the exception of those offering the Classics and Modern Languages paper in Late Latin Philology, who will be precluded from answering it.

201 Anglo-Norman Language and Literature.

202 Old Provencal. Prescribed text: F.R. Hamlin, P.T. Ricketts, J. Hathaway, Introduction a l'etude de l'ancien provencal, Geneva 1967 and 1985, with particular reference to nos. 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28, 31, 33, 34, 36, 39, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 49, 53, 54, 56, 57, 59, 65, 67, 70, from which passages will be set for translation. In addition, candidates may answer questions on either literary or linguistic topics or both.

203 The twelfth- and thirteenth-century Grail Romances.

204 French historical writing up to 1515.

205 French poetry of the mid-sixteenth century.

206 Dramatic theory and practice in France from 1605 to 1660, with special reference to Corneille.

207 French grammarians and linguistic theory of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

208 Jean-Jacques Rousseau.[3]

209 Honore de Balzac.

210 French Poetry 1870 to 1918.

211 French literature and the First World War.

212 Marcel Proust.[4]

213 Surrealism.

214 The `Nouveau Roman', with special reference to the work of Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute and Butor.

215 Literature and the visual arts from Diderot to Zola.

216 French women writers.

217 Advanced French Translation: Theory and Practice.

300 Old Norse. Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of F. Ranke and D. Hofmann, Altnordisches Elementarbuch (Sammlung Goeschen No. 1115), pp. 80–135. Candidates will also be expected to have read the Voelsungasaga and related material from the Poetic Edda.

301 Old High German, with either Gothic or Old Saxon or Old English. Prescribed texts: Gothic, Gospel according to St Mark, chapters 1–9; Old Saxon, Heliand, ll. 4025–5038; Old English, Beowulf, ll. 1– 1049.

302 The German Minnesang. Candidates will be expected to have made a special study of Friedrich von Hausen, Lieder (ed. Schweikle) (Reclam); Reinmar, Lieder (ed. Schweikle) (Reclam); Heinrich von Morungen, Lieder (ed. Tervooren) (Reclam).

303 Wolfram von Eschenbach.

304 Martin Luther.

305 German poetry and drama of the seventeenth century.

306 Eighteenth-century German aesthetics from Baumgarten to Schiller.

307 Hoelderlin, Hyperion, Empedokles (ed. M. B. Benn, Clarendon German Series) and the poetry written after 1797.

308 The Bildungsroman from Wieland to Keller.

309 German political thought from 1780 to 1830. Candidates will be expected to have read: Kant, Idee zu einer allgemeinen Geschichte in weltbuergerlicher Absicht, 1784; Zum ewigen Frieden, 1795; Humboldt, Ideen zu einem Versuch, die Grenzen der Wirksamkeit des Staates zu bestimmen, 1792; Novalis, Die Christenheit oder Europa, 1799; Fichte, Reden an die deutsche Nation, 1808; Hegel, Vorlesungen ueber die Philosophie der Geschichte, Einleitung (ed. Th. Litt, Reclam); Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts, Vorrede, 1821.

310 Johann Nestroy and the Wiener Volkstheater.

311 The poetry of Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan George, and Rainer Maria Rilke. Candidates will be examined on the poetry of two of these authors and will be expected to have read the works listed in any two of the sections below.

(a) Hofmannsthal: Gedichte und Lyrische Dramen, ed. Steiner (Fischer Verlag, 1952), pp. 7–136, 467–529.
(b) George: Hymnen, Pilgerfahrten, Algabal; Das Jahr der Seele; Der Teppich des Lebens und die Lieder von Traum und Tod mit einem Vorspiel; the sections `Zeitgedichte', `Gestalten', `Gezeiten', and `Maximin' from Der siebente Ring; Das neue Reich omitting the section `Sprueche'.
(c) Rilke: Das Stunden-Buch; Neue Gedichte (both parts); Requiem fuer eine Freundin; Requiem fuer Wolf Graf von Kalckreuth; Die Sonette an Orpheus; Duineser Elegien.

312 `Expressionist' poetry. Candidates will be expected to have a detailed knowledge of poetry included in Lyrik des Expressionismus ed. Silvio Vietta (Deutsche Texte no. 37, published by Niemeyer).

313 The Writer and Politics in the Weimar Republic. Candidates will be expected to have read in particular: Willi Bredel, Maschinenfabrik N&K; Leonhard Frank, Der Mensch ist gut; Franz Jung, Die rote Woche and Die Eroberung der Maschinen; Anna Seghers, Grubetsch and Aufstand der Fischer von St. Barbara; Ernst Toller, Die Wandlung, Masse Mensch, Die Maschinenstuermer, Der deutsche Hinkemann and Hoppla, wir leben; Friedrich Wolf, Der Unbedingte, Cyankali: §218 and Die Jungen von Mons; and a selection of the post-1919 poetry of Erich Muehsam and Kurt Tucholsky.

314 German Poetry since 1945. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field, and a detailed knowledge of works written in or after 1945 by three of the following authors: Bachmann, Benn, Biermann, Bobrowski, Volker Braun, Brecht, Celan (the collections of poetry from Mohn und Gedachtnis to Atemwende inclusive), Enzensberger, Grass, Huchel, Sarah Kirsch, Kunert, Sachs.

Note: The paper will include a compulsory section containing general questions and commentary passages taken from the authors being offered; candidates will thus be required to attempt either a general essay or a commentary. Brecht's poetry from 1945 to 1956 may be offered as one of the three authors selected for detailed knowledge in this paper by candidates offering Brecht as a prescribed author in paper X.

315 The German novel since 1945. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field, and to have read German- language novels relating to the topics listed below. The paper will consist of a number of general questions, and a number of questions on each of the following topics (candidates will be precluded from answering more than two questions on any one topic): Narrative Voice; `Vergangenheitsbewaltigung'; Politics and Society; Identity and Gender.

400 Italian lyric poetry of the thirteenth century.

401 Dante's minor works.

402 `Questione della lingua.' Candidates will be expected to have read: Dante, De Vulgari Eloquentia; Bembo, Prose della volgar lingua; Manzoni, Scritti sulla lingua.

403 Vico.

404 The aesthetics and literary criticism of Croce. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with Part I of the Estetica, Croce's principal theoretical additions to it, and a broad sample of his criticism of Italian literature.

405 The Works of Carlo Emilio Gadda.

406 Sicilian literature 1950–1990.

407 Italian Women Writers 1950–1990

500 The Civilization of Muslim Spain.[5]

501 The Eastern Dialects of Spain, with Catalan. 502 Spanish Drama before Lope de Vega. Candidates will be expected to be familiar with the works of: Juan del Encina, Lucas Fernandez, Lope de Rueda, Juan de la Cueva, Bartolome de Torres Naharro, Diego Sanchez de Badajoz, Juan de Timoneda, Miguel Venegas, Miguel de Cervantes, and the Spanish works of Gil Vicente. Candidates will be expected to have read the Portuguese and bilingual texts of Gil Vicente, but passages for comment, which will not be compulsory, will not be set from these.

503 The Spanish Erasmians. Candidates will be expected to have read: Erasmus, El Enquiridion (ed. Damaso Alonso, Madrid, 1932); Coloquios de Erasmo (Nueva Biblioteca de Autores Espanoles, vol. xxi, pp. 149– 202, 227–49); Alfonso de Valdes, Dialogo de las cosas ocurridas en Roma (ed. Jose F. Montesinos, Clasicos castellanos); Juan de Valdes, Dialogo de doctrina christiana y el psalterio (ed. Domingo Ricart, Mexico, 1964, pp. 1–130); Juan Luis Vives, Concordia y discordia en el linaje humano [De concordia et discordia in humano genere], Bk. IV (Obras completas, trans. L. Riber, Aguilar, Madrid, 1947–8, ii, 195–253); Cristobal de Villalon (attr.), Viaje de Turquia (Part I); F. de la Torre, Institucion de un rey christiano (ed. R. W. Truman, Exeter Hispanic Texts, 1979)(passages for commentary will not be set from this text).

504 The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico and the Antilles. Candidates will be expected to have read: Cristobal Colon, Los cuatro viajes del almirante y su testamento (ed. Austral); Hernan Cortes, Cartas de relacion de la conquista de Mejico (ed. M. Alcala, Porrua, Mexico) and A. R. Pagden, Hernan Cortes: Letters from Mexico (Oxford University Press, London, 1972), Letters two and three; Bernal Diaz del Castillo, Historia de la Conquista de la Nueva Espana (Porrua, Mexico, 1960), vol. i, pp. 174–501 and vol. ii, pp. 1–60; Bartolome de las Casas, Brevisima relacion de la destruccion de las Indias (EUDEBA, Buenos Aires, 1966); Toribio de Motolinia, Historia de los Indios de la Nueva Espana (Porrua, Mexico, 1969), pp. 77–109; Bernardino de Sahagun, Historia general de la Nueva Espana (Porrua, Mexico, 1956), Libros 3, 7, and 8. Candidates will also be expected to have read Pedro Martir de Angleria, Decadas del Nuevo Mundo (ed. J. Torres Asensio), omitting Decadas 2, 3, and 6.

505 Spanish devotional and mystical writing 1577–88. Candidates will be expected to have read: Santa Teresa de Jesus, Moradas del castillo interior; Fray Luis de Granada, Introduccion del simbolo de la fe (ed. Jose Maria Balcells, Madrid, Catedra, 1989), pp. 125–231; Fray Luis de Leon, Rey de Dios, Esposo, and Jesus, from De los nombres de Cristo; San Juan de la Cruz, Llama de amor viva (candidates will also be expected to have read the poem), Malon de Chaide, La conversion de la Magdalena (3 vols., ed. Felix Garcia, Clasicos Castellanos, Madrid, 1958), III, 83–178, 190–219.

506 Federico Garcia Lorca. Candidates will be expected to have read: Federico Garcia Lorca, Obras completas (Aguilar, Edicion del cincuentenario), three vols. Passages for commentary will be set from among the following: Canciones, Poeta en Nueva York, Llanto por Ignacio Sanchez Mejias, Yerma, El publico.

507 Twentieth-century Catalan literature. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages for comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from the authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern Languages Administration and Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the examination.

508 Galician literature and culture after Francoism. Candidates will be expected to have a general knowledge of the field and a detailed knowledge of works by at least three authors. Passages for comment, which will not be compulsory, will be set from authors currently prescribed. Details of the authors and works prescribed for detailed knowledge will be available in the Modern Languages Faculty Office, 37 Wellington Square, at the beginning of the Michaelmas Full Term of the academic year of the examination.

530 The Work of Alfonso the Wise as author and patron of literature and learning. Passages for commentary will be set from Primera cronica general (ed. R. Menendez Pidal, Madrid, 1955), caps. 814– 967; Las siete partidas (ed. Real Academia de la Historia, Madrid, 1807), I (Prologo and i—both versions), ii; II (i, iii–v, ix–xi, xv, xviii, xxi–xxii, xxiv, xxxi); III (xix–xx); Cantigas de Santa Maria (ed. Jesus Montoya, Letras hispanicas, 293, Madrid, Catedra).

531 Spanish and Portuguese Prose Romances of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries. Candidates will be expected to have a knowledge of the field and to have made a special study of at least one romance from each of the following groups, from which passages for literary commentary will be set: (a) sentimental, (b) chivalric, and (c) pastoral.

(a) Diego de San Pedro, Carcel de amor (ed. Whinnom); Juan de Flores, Grimalte y Gradissa (ed. Waley); Bernardim Ribeiro, Menina e moca; (b) Spanish Grail Fragments (ed. Pietsch); Amadis de Gaula, Part I (ed. Place); Palmeirim de Inglaterra (ed. Rodrigues Lapa); Tirant lo Blanch, Book I; (c) Jorge de Montemayor, Los siete libros de la Diana (ed. Lopez Estrada); Gil Polo, Diana enamorada (ed. Ferreres); Samuel Usque, Consolacžo as tribulacžes de Israel vol. i.

532 Latin American Fiction from 1940. Candidates will be expected to show a detailed knowledge of the novels/short stories of at least two of the following authors: Jorge Luis Borges, Alejo Carpentier, Julio Cortazar, Fernando del Paso, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Jožo Guimaržes Rosa, Osman Lins, Clarice Lispector, Mario Vargas Llosa.

560 The Galician-Portuguese Cancioneiros.

561 The Chronicles of the Portuguese Expansion in Asia. Candidates will be expected to have read: the texts in Portuguese contained in T.F. Earle and John Villiers, Albuquerque, Caesar of the East (Aris and Phillips, 1990); Jožo de Barros, Decadas, ed. Antonio Baižo, vol. I (Sa da Costa, 1945) (candidates are advised to consult also the electronic edition of the Decadas published by the Centre for the Study of the Portuguese Discoveries); Diogo do Couto, O soldado pratico, ed. Rodrigues Lapa (Sa da Costa, 1954); Fernžo Mendes Pinto, Peregrinacžo, chaps. 1, 36–104, 203–26.

562 Camžes. Candidates will be expected to have read Os Lusiadas (ed. F. Pierce)(passages for translation will be set from Cantos I, V, IX) and Liricas (ed. Rodrigues Lapa, 1970 or later).

563 The Brazilian Novel of the North-East 1880–1960.

600 Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and Russian.[6]

601 Comparative Slavonic Philology, with special reference to Russian and any one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.

602 The structure and history of one of the following languages: Bulgarian, Czech, Macedonian, Polish, Serbo-Croat, Slovak, Slovene, Sorbian, Ukrainian, White Russian.[7]

603 Language and style in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Russian literature.

604 Russian thought from 1825 to 1905. Candidates will be expected to have read the works of Belinsky, Herzen, the Slavophiles, Chernyshevsky, Mikhaylovsky, Plekhanov, Lenin.

605 Russian narrative fiction from 1917. Questions will be set predominantly on the following authors: Babel', Bulgakov, Erenburg, Leonov, Olesha, Pasternak, Sholokhov, Solzhenitsyn, Zamyatin.

606 Modern Russian poetry, with special reference to the works of Akhmatova, Mandel'shtam, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva.

607 Russian religious philosophy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with special reference to the works of Fedorov, Solov'ev, Berdyaev, Florensky, and S. Bulgakov.

608 Czech and Slovak fiction since 1945, with reference to the works of Hrabal, Paral, Kundera, Bednar, Johanides, and others.

700 The Greek Enlightenment.

701 The School of the Ionian Islands 1797–1912, with special reference to the works of Solomos, Kalvos, Laskaratos, Matesis, Valaoritis, and Mavilis.

702 The New Athenian School of Poetry 1880–1912, with special reference to the works of Palamas, Drosinis, Gryparis, Krystallis, Malakasis, and Hadzopoulos.

703 The Greek novel 1918–40, with special reference to the works of K. Theotokis, G. Theotokas, Karagatsis, Myrivilis, Venezis, K. Politis, and G. N. Abbot.

800 The records of Continental Celtic.

801 Medieval Welsh tales and romances.[8]

802 The poets of the Welsh princes.[8]

803 The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym.[8]

804 The Ulster Cycle of tales.

805 The classical Irish bardic tradition.

806 The structure and history of the Welsh language.

807 The structure and history of the Irish language.

900 Hebrew poetry and prose of Medieval Spain and Provence. In addition to the literary texts, candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the historical background of Spain and Provence from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries, in particular the transition from an Islamic to a Christian environment and the Jewish response to it. Candidates will be expected to have read selected works by the following writers: Moses Ibn Ezra; Abraham Ibn Ezra; Joseph Ibn Zabara; Judah al-Harizi; Meshullam da Piera; Shem Tob Falaquera; Todros Abulafia; Isaac Hagorni. All texts will be selected from J. Schirmann, Hashirah ha'ivrit besefarad uveprovans.

901 Early twentieth-century Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the work of Central and East European Hebrew writers (some of whom settled in Jewish Palestine in the early decades of this century) and in particular of their literary development in the environment of Austrian, Russian, and Polish literature, and their influence in shaping contemporary Hebrew literature. Candidates will be expected to have read stories by Y. H. Brenner and by M. Berdyczewski; David Vogel's novel, Hayei nisu'im; a selection of poetry by H. N. Bialik, Saul Tschernichovsky, Leah Goldberg, Nathan Alterman, and Abraham Shlonski. Texts will be selected from the following works: Y. H. Brenner, Kovetz sippurim (Sifrei Mofet); Y. Lichtenbaum (ed.), Sofreinu (Ahiasaf); T. Carmi (ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse.

902 The literature of the State of Israel. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of modern Israel's literary history and the development of its literature in the light of twentieth- century Western European influences. Candidates will be expected to have read stories by S. Y. Agnon, Aharon Meged, and Aharon Appelfeld; a selection of poetry by Nathan Zach, Yehuda Amichai, Dan Pagis, and Meir Wieseltier; and two plays by Yehoshua Sobol. Texts will be selected from the following works: S. Y. Agnon, Sefer Ha-ma'asim (Schocken Books, 1948); Aharon Appelfeld, Shanim vesha'ot (Hakibbutz Hameuchad, 1975); T. Carmi (ed.), The Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse; Yehoshua Sobol, Nefesh yehudi and Ghetto.

903 Yiddish Linguistics. Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the methods and findings of Yiddish linguistic research with respect to any three of the following five topics: (i) origins and history of Yiddish; (ii)interrelationships with German dialects and standard German; (iii) the Semitic component in Yiddish; (iv) Yiddish dialectology; (v) Yiddish sociolinguistics. Required readings for each of these topics will be in Yiddish, English, and German.

904 Modern Yiddish Literature. Candidates will be expected to have read:

Sholem Aleichem, Kasrilevker progres (in his Fun Kasrilevke, NY 1919, pp. 11–84); Ber Borokhov, Di ufgabn fun der yidisher filologye (in Shprakhforshung un literatur geshikhte, ed. N. Mayzl, Tel Aviv 1966, pp. 53–75); Sh. An-ski (Shloyme-Zanvl Rapoport), Der dibek (in Di yidishe drame fun tsvantsikstn yorhundert, NY 1977, vol. ii, pp. 7– 60); selections from the poetry of R. Ayzland, A. M. Dilon, M. L. Halpern, Z. Landoy, M. Leyb, H. Leyvik, Y. Y. Shvarts, A. N. Stencl, M. Vintshevski (in Musterverk fun der yidisher literatur, ed. Rozhanski, vol. lxxvi, pp. 40–53, 61–6, 91–100, 112–34; vol. lxxviii, pp. 211, 234–8); Isaac Bashevis Singer, A togbukh fun a nisht geboyrenem and Der yid fun bovl (in his Der sotn in goray un andere dertseylungen, Jerusalem 1972, pp. 251–70, 307–19).

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Footnotes

[1] Candidates offering the Optional Subject `General Linguistics' may not offer paper XIII from the Honour School of Modern Languages.

No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `General Linguistics' and the paper `Linguistic Theory' from the Honour School of English Language and Literature.

[2] No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Modern Literary Theory' and the paper `The History and Theory of Criticism' from the Honour School of English Language and Literature.

[3] No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Jean-Jacques Rousseau' and the Modern History Political and Social Thought paper.

[4] No candidate in the Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Marcel Proust' and Further Subject in General History, `Literature, Politics, and Society in France 1870–1914'.

[5] Candidates will be given an opportunity to show knowledge of Arabic, but will not be required to show such knowledge. Candidates offering this paper must have the approval of the Joint Committee on Arabic and Spanish. Applications should be sent to the Faculty Secretary, Oriental Institute, not later than the Monday of second week of Michaelmas Term in the academic year in which the candidate proposes to take the examination.

[6] No candidate in the Honour School of Modern Languages or in a joint Honour School involving Modern Languages may offer both the Optional Subject `Old Church Slavonic in relation to Common Slavonic and Russian' and option (1) (`The Old Church Slavonic language') in the Linguistic Studies paper II in Russian (Russian paper V from the Honour School of Modern Languages).

[7] Candidates offering Czech (with Slovak) will not be permitted to offer either of those languages in the Optional Subject on the structure and history of one of certain specified languages.

[8] No candidate in the Honour School of English and Modern Languages may offer the paper `Medieval Welsh' from the Honour School of English Language and Literature with any of the Optional Subjects `Medieval Welsh tales and romances', `The poets of the Welsh princes', and `The poetry of Dafydd ap Gwilym'.

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CHAIRMEN OF EXAMINERS

TRINITY TERM 1996

Honour Schools

English: I. RIVERS, MA, Fellow of St Hugh's

Modern History: J. STEVENSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester

Modern History and Economics: C.C.C. ANDREYEV, MA, D.PHIL., Student of Christ Church

Natural Science—Chemistry Part I: M.J.T. ROBINSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen (address: Dyson Perrins Laboratory)

Physics and Philosophy: I.J.R. AITCHISON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Worcester (address: Department of Physics)

Master of Philosophy

English Studies Courses (i) and (ii): E.H. COOPER, MA, Fellow of University

Bachelor of Philosophy

Philosophy: M.K. DAVIES, B.PHIL., MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Corpus Christi

Law Moderations

D.J. IBBETSON, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Magdalen

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