Examinations and Boards

Contents of this section:

[Note. An asterisk denotes a reference to a previously published or recurrent entry.]

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Election of one official member

27 June 1996

The following has been duly elected as an official member, to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997:

P.C. NEWELL, MA, Head of Biochemistry Department elect

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MODERN HISTORY

Election of one ordinary member

27 June 1996

The following has been duly elected as an ordinary member, to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997:

J.H. HOWARTH, MA, Fellow of St Hilda's

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Election of one ordinary member

27 June 1996

The following has been duly elected as an ordinary member, to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997:

G.L. SMITH, MA, Fellow of Wadham

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BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL STUDIES

Election of two ordinary members

27 June 1996

The following have been duly elected as ordinary members, to hold office from the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1996 until the beginning of Michaelmas Term 1997:

M.E. CEADEL, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of New College
I.S. MCLEAN, MA, D.PHIL., Fellow of Nuffield

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BOARDS OF THE FACULTIES OF PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGICAL STUDIES

M.Sc. in Neuroscience

The approved courses available in 1996–7 for the specialist neuroscience component of the M.Sc. in Neuroscience are listed below. Candidates will be required take five courses, choosing at least one under each of the three series A, B, and C.

Module A1: Cellular signalling

Organisers: Dr J.J.B. Jack and Dr A.U. Larkman.

Thirteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Structure and function of membranes
Varieties of ion channels
Synaptic transmission
Synaptic modifiability

Module A2: Techniques for monitoring and analysing neuronal circuits

Organiser: Dr A.J. King.

Fourteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Recording and monitoring neuronal activity
Direct manipulation of the brain
Cortical microcircuitry
Field potentials in health and disease

Module A3: Imaging and mapping techniques

Organiser: Dr R.E. Passingham.

Fourteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Neuroanatomical techniques
Techniques for functional localisation
Structural imaging
Functional imaging

Module B1: Sensory systems

Organiser: Dr D.R. Moore.

Twelve lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Sensory systems analysis
Sensory psychophysics
Artificial vision

Module B2: Clinical aspects of neuroscience

Organiser: Dr J.N.P. Rawlins.

Eighteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

The development and application of animal models
Consciousness and cognition
Non-affective neurological disorders

Module B3: Neurocomputing and neural networks

Organiser: Dr E.T. Rolls.

Eleven lectures and associated practicals.

Neurocomputing
Connectionist approaches to cognitive function: two-day workshop

Module C1: CNS development

Organiser: Dr J.S.H. Taylor.

Eight lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Early development
Formation of a nervous system
Development of sense organs

Module C2: Synaptic plasticity

Organiser: To be confirmed.

Fifteen lectures and associated practicals/demonstrations.

Axonal growth
Establishing connections between neuronal populations
The modifiability of the brain

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CHANGES IN REGULATIONS

The following changes in regulations made by the General Board, and with the approval of the General Board, the following changes in regulations made by boards of faculties and the Committee on Continuing Education will come into effect on 26 July.

1 General Board of the Faculties

Departmental Committees

With immediate effect

In Ch. II, Sect. xiii, § 2, cl. 1 (Statutes, 1995, p. 244), after

`working in the department' insert `and to academic- related staff of grade RSII or above, or of grade ALC3 and above, who work in the department and have more than three years' service in the employment of the University of Oxford in RS or ALC grades'.

2 Boards of the Faculties of English Language and Literature and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Classics and English

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 148, after l. 31, add:

`(xiv) Either (a) Plato, Republic (subject 130 (a)) or (b) Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (subject 131 (a)), as specified in `Regulations for Philosophy in some of the Honour Schools' (p. 481).'

3 Board of the Faculty of Law

(a) Honour School of Jursiprudence

(i) With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 261, l. 21, delete `and determination'.

2 Ibid., p. 262, l. 7, delete `(1800 to the present)'.

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 260, as amended in Gazette, Vol. 126, No. 4398, p. 1015, after l. 17 as amended substitute:

`Course I [Until 1 October 1998: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23.] [From 1 October 1998: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, and either 4 or 15, and four from 5–23 (excluding 15 if substituted for 4); and one special subject; provided that candidates may substitute any two special subjects for one of the standard subject papers 5–23 (excluding 15 if substitute for 4).]

Course 2 [Until 1 October 1998: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, 4, and four from 5–23.] [From 1 October 1998: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, and either 4 or 15, and four from 5–23 (excluding 15 if substituted for 4).] [From 1 October 1999: Candidates shall be examined in eight standard subjects, viz. 1, 2, 3, and either 4 or 15, and four from 5–23 (excluding 15 if substituted for 4); and one special subject; provided that candidates may substitute any two special subjects for one of the standard subject papers 5–23 (excluding 15 if substitute for 4).]'

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(b) Bachelor of Civil Law

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 850, l. 37 delete `(1800 to the present)'.

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(c) Magister Juris in European and Comparative Law

With immediate effect

As for (a) (i) and (b) above.

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4 Board of the Faculty of Literae Humaniores

(a) Honour Moderations in Classics

With effect from 1 October 1999 (for first examination in 2000)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 32, delete ll. 35–40,1 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two sections, both of which must be attempted:

(a) exercises designed to test Greek accidence and syntax;

(b) translation into Greek of a short passage of English.'

2 Ibid., p. 32, delete from p. 32, l. 431 to p. 33, l. 5,1 and substitute:

`One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two sections, both of which must be attempted:

(a) exercises designed to test Latin accidence and syntax;

(b) translation into Latin of a short passage of English.'

3 Ibid., p. 35, delete ll. 11–14 and substitute:

`X GREEK LANGUAGE

One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two sections, both of which must be attempted:

(a) exercises designed to test Greek accidence and syntax;

(b) translation into Greek of a short passage of English. The passage set will be related, in its demands of vocabulary and syntax, to the Greek prose literature used in the elementary Greek instruction provided for this course.'

4 Ibid., p. 36, l. 33, delete `TRANSLATION INTO LATIN' and substitute

`LATIN LANGUAGE'.

5 Ibid., p. 38, delete ll. 38–41 and substitute:

`IX LATIN LANGUAGE

One paper (three hours). The paper will consist of two sections, both of which must be attempted:

(a) exercises designed to test Latin accidence and syntax;

(b) translation into Latin of a short passage of English.

The passage set will be related, in its demands of vocabulary and syntax, to the Latin prose literature used in the elementary Latin instruction provided for this course.'

6 Ibid., p. 40, l. 9, delete `TRANSLATION INTO GREEK' and substitute

`GREEK LANGUAGE'.

7 Ibid., p. 33, l. 6,1 after `VERSE COMPOSITION' insert `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'.

8 Ibid., after l. 91 insert:

`(b) passages for translation into Greek and Latin prose, candidates being required to translate one passage.2'

9 Ibid., l. 10,1 letter (b) as (c).

10 Ibid., l. 24,1 after `or (b)' insert `or (c)'. 11 Ibid., p. 35, l. 17, p. 36, l. 34, p. 38, l. 42 and p. 40, l. 10, after `VERSE COMPOSITION' add `OR PROSE COMPOSITION'. 1 Note: There are errors in line numbering on pp. 32 and 33 of the 1995 Examination Decrees; the above changes refer to the correct line numbers.

2 Candidates for Course 1A taking three special subjects may offer translation into Greek prose only if taking paper XI (Latin Language), and into Latin prose only if taking paper X (Greek Language).

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(b) Honour School of Literae Humaniores

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 290, l. 44, delete `Andocides: De Mysteriis, MacDowell.'

2 Ibid., p. 291, l. 4, delete `Molinié rev. by Billault (Budé)' and substitute `Goold (Loeb)'.

3 Ibid., l. 34, delete `Lysias: *Hude.'

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5 Boards of the Faculties of Literae Humaniores and Theology

Honour School of Philosophy and Theology

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 for one year (for examination in 1997 only)

As for the Honour School of Theology (see 16 (b) (i) below).

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1999)

1 As for the Honour School of Theology (see 16 (b) (ii) below).

2 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 510, ll. 6–10, delete `with . . . specified.' and substitute `as prescribed for the Honour School of Theology)'.

3 Ibid., l. 11, delete `(9)' and substitute `(6)'.

4 Ibid., p. 511, l. 22, delete `(15)' and substitute `(17)'.

5 Ibid., l. 23, delete `(18)' and substitute `(20)'.

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6 Board of the Faculty of Mathematical Sciences

(a) Honour School of Computation

With immediate effect

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 169, ll. 22–3, delete `in Trinity Term, two years in advance of the relevant examination.' and substitute `in the Michaelmas Term of the year preceding the academic year in which the relevant examination is held.'

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(b) M.Sc. in Geometry, Mathematical Physics, and Analysis

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 747, delete ll. 9–10 and substitute:

`(i) a written examination consisting of two papers on topics taken from those listed in Schedule 1; the questions will be of a short and straightforward nature and will be designed to test competence in using basic tools of geometry and analysis in mathematical and physical problems; the actual topics covered by the questions in any year will be determined by the material covered in the core Schedule 1 lectures, the synopses of which will be included in a document approved by the standing committee in Trinity Term, and circulated to all candidates for this M.Sc. before the beginning of Michaelmas Term.'

2 Ibid., l. 34, delete `four' and substitute `three'.

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7 Board of the Faculty of Modern History

Honour School of Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 339, after l. 36 insert:

`Candidates who have taken the Foundation Course in Modern History rather than Honour Moderations are required to offer at least one paper which relates to a period between 285 and 1409 (this may be taken to include Period (1) of the History of the British Isles).'

2 Ibid., p. 360, delete l. 47 and substitute:

`K. Marx, `Introduction' to The Critique of Hegel's Doctrine of the State, in Early Writings, ed. L. Coletti (Penguin Books, 1974, repr. 1992, 1995) (pp. 243–57); Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 (Ibid., pp. 279–400).'

3 Ibid., p. 361, l. 1, after `Society,', insert `Book I,'.

4 Ibid., l. 3, delete `31–163.' and substitute:

`31–163: Professional Ethics and Civic Morals (RKP 1957, rpr. 1992).'

5 Ibid., delete ll. 7–10 and substitute:

`and Class Structure', pp. 390–5; Max Weber: Political Writings ed. P. Lassman and R. Speirs (CUP, 1994), `The Nation State and Economic Policy (pp. 1–28), `Parliament and Government in Germany under a New Political Order' (pp. 130–271), `Socialism' (pp. 272–303), `The Profession and Vocation of Politics' (pp. 309–69).'

6 Ibid., delete ll. 19–22 and substitute:

`G.W.F. Hegel, The Philosophy of Right, trans. T.M. Knox (Oxford, 1942).'

7 Ibid., p. 382, delete ll. 46–53 and substitute:

`pp. 21, 25–96, 101–55, 161, 184, 186–90, 193–333, 371– 432, 445–53, 593–96, 661–777.'

8 Ibid., p. 383, after l. 2, insert:

`To Roberts S. Chew, April 6, 1861, IV, 323–4.
Proclamation Calling Militia and Convening Congress, IV, 331–2.'

9 Ibid., delete l. 4.

10 Ibid., l. 5, insert `Annual Message to Congress, December 1, 1862, V, 518–37.'

11 Ibid., after l. 6, insert `Gettysburg Address (Final Text), VII 22–3.'

12 Ibid., after l. 12, insert:

`United States, Statutes at Large, XII Boston, 1863: First Confiscation Act (August 6, 1861), p. 319.
Act to Make an Additional Article of War (March 3, 1862), p. 354.
Emancipation in the District of Columbia (April 16, 1862), pp. 576–8.
Abolition of Slavery in Territories (June 19, 1962), p. 432.
Second Confiscation Act (July 17, 1862), pp. 589–92.
Free at Last. A Documentary History of Slavery, Freedom and the Civil War, ed. Ira Berlin, et al. (1992), pp. 3–85, 95–165, 241–331, 435–539.'

13 Ibid., l. 14, delete `Vol. III 1–115.' and substitute `1–71, 122–77, 252–473, Vol. III, 2–72.'.

14 Ibid., delete l. 46.

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8 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and English Language and Literature

Honour School of Modern History and English

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 7 above).

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9 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Literae Humaniores

Honour School of Ancient and Modern History

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 7 above).

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10 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Modern Languages

Honour School of Modern History and Modern Languages

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 7 above).

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11 Boards of the Faculties of Modern History and Social Studies

Honour School of Modern History and Economics

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

As for the Honour School of Modern History (see 7 above).

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12 Board of the Faculty of Music

Honour School of Music

With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 429, delete ll. 21–41 and substitute:

`The Board of the Faculty of Music shall approve, and publish each year by notice in the Faculty of Music, not later than the end of the eighth week of Trinity Term, a list of specified areas of study in (1) and (2) above for examination six terms thence.

(3) Candidates must offer either

Techniques of Composition I (one paper)

Candidates will be required to complete or continue in the appropriate style a piece of music from which at least one part will be given. One question must be answered from four set as follows:

(a) sixteenth-century continental vocal polyphony in four parts (questions may be not only in imitative but also in free and homorhythmic style);

(b) aria in three parts (voice, obbligato instrument, and basso continuo) from the period c.1700–c.1760 (questions may be in the style of either J.S. Bach and his contemporaries or Handel and his school);

(c) four-part texture, typically a string quartet of period c.1760–c.1830;

(d) nineteenth-century song accompaniment for piano, in the Austro-Germanic tradition. or Techniques of Composition II (portfolio submission); see under List C (1)

(4) Musical analysis and criticism'.

2 Ibid., p. 432, l. 27, delete `third' and substitute `eighth'.

3 Ibid., delete ll. 29–30.

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13 Board of the Faculty of Physical Sciences

Preliminary Examination in Engineering Science

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 85, l. 10, delete `that number of' and substitute `those'.

2 Ibid., in ll. 33–5 delete `, having previously failed to satisfy them in some papers, satisfy them in the remaining papers at that examination' and substitute `have satisfied them in each of the papers offered'.

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14 Board of the Faculty of Psychological Studies

(a) Honour School of Experimental Psychology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 241, l. 8, after `examination.' insert:

`Candidates who do not offer paper D2 (Research Project) will be required to include an Experimental Project (Mini-Project) in their practical work, the subject of which shall be approved in advance by the Head of the Department of Experimental Psychology or deputy.'

2 Ibid., l. 14, after `work' insert:

`save that candidates who are required to include an Experimental Project (Mini-Project) in their practical work shall submit a written report of this not later than the end of the eighth week of Hilary Term preceding the term in which the examination is to be held. The provisions of this clause which follow apply to the Experimental Project and to the other practical work.'

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(b) Honour School of Psychology, Philosophy, and Physiology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 525, in l. 20, after `examination.' insert:

`This practical work may, under conditions specified by the Head of Deaprtment of Experimental Psychology, include an Experimental Project (Mini-Project), the subject of which shall be approved in advance by the head of department or deputy.'

2 Ibid., in l. 26, after `work' insert:

`save that candidates who are required to include an Experimental Project (Mini-Project) in their practical work shall submit a written report of this not later than the end of the eighth week of Hilary Term preceding the term in which the examination is to be held. The provisions of this clause which follow apply to the Experimental Project and to the other practical work.'

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15 Board of the Faculty of Social Studies

Honour School of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 495, delete ll. 23–5 and substitute:

`The highest Honours can be obtained by excellence in a minority of subjects offered provided that adequate knowledge is shown throughout the examination.'

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(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 503, delete ll. 2–6 and substitute:

`The nature and development of social policy and welfare states. Public, private and informal systems of welfare. Alternative definitions and explanations of poverty and deprivation. The sources, growth, organisation and outcomes of British social policy with special reference to health, nursing, social security, and education.'

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16 Board of the Faculty of Theology

(a) Preliminary Examination for Theology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 122, l. 25, after `theology.' insert: `Candidates must offer at least one from amongst papers 5, 6, or 7.'

2 Ibid., p. 123, Note*, delete `3rd' and substitute `4th'.

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(b) Honour School of Theology

(i) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 538, after l. 50, insert:

`(31) The Formation of Rabbinic Judaism (70 ce–950 ce) The course will describe the formation of rabbinic Judaism as reflected in its primary texts. Some reference will be made to the contexts of late Antiquity, early Christendom, and the Zoroastrian and Islamic worlds.

It will consider the following issues: How did the rabbis translate (Targum) and interpret (Midrash) the Hebrew scriptures? How did they structure the religious system which emerged from their reflections on scripture (Mishna/Tosefta)? What forms of liturgy and spirituality did they create, and how did they relate to the Jewish mystical tradition?

The Babylonian Talmud and its definition of Torah.

Judaism under Islam—the Gaonic period. Confrontation with other faiths, with rationalist philosophy, and with serious critiques of both scripture and the rabbinic tradition.

The following primary rabbinic texts in translation are set for special study:

The Daily Prayer Book of the United Hebrew Congregations of the British Commonwealth of Nations (Centenary Edition, London: Singer's Prayer Book Publication Committee, 1990): pp. 46, 56 (Amida prayer) and pp. 251–4 (Ethics of the Fathers ch. 1))

The Mishnah translated by H. Danby. (London: OUP, 1933). Tractate Berakhoth chs. 4, 5; tractate Baba Kamma chapter 8.

Lauterbach, J.Z., Mekilta deRabbi Ishmael (text and translation) (3 vols. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society of America, 1933–5). The section of the Ten Commandments, in vol. 2.

Cohn-Sherbok, Dan. Jewish Mysticism: An Anthology. (Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 1995). Extracts on pp. 59–62; 68–71.

Saadia Gaon, The Book of Beliefs and Opinions tr. Samuel Rosenblatt. (New Haven: Yale University Press and London: OUP, 1948), pp. 137–63 (`Concerning Command and Prohibition').'

2 Ibid., p. 540, l. 1, delete `(31)' [previously (34) as renumbered in Gazette, No. 4397, 19 April 1996, pp. 936–7] and insert `(32)'.

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1998 (for first examination in 1999)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, delete from p. 529, l. 19 to p. 540, l. 48, and substitute:

`1. All candidates will be required to offer eight papers, one from each of the Core Subjects in Section A (A.I–IV), and four from any ONE of the Alternative Tracks in Section B (B.I–II).

2. In Alternative Track B.I two papers, and in Alternative Track B.II one paper, may be chosen from amongst those not already offered in Section A, Section B (subject to any restrictions specified in each Alternative Track), and Section C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers. With the permission of the board an essay may be offered in place of one of these papers. The regulations governing essays are set out below.

3. Candidates not offering paper (17) The Hebrew of the Old Testament, or (20) The New Testament in Greek, as optional papers in Section B may, in addition to their eight papers, also offer the Optional Translation papers in Old Testament Hebrew and/or New Testament Greek.

4. In Section B (the Alternative Tracks B.I–II) and in Section C (the Schedule of Further Optional Subjects) teaching may not be available every year on every subject.

5. Any candidate may be examined viva voce.

6. In the following regulations, the English version of the Bible used will be the Revised Standard Version. The Greek text used will be the text of the United Bible Societies, 4th edn., but in paper (3), The Four Gospels, parallel texts will be taken from K. Aland, Synopsis Quattuor Evangeliorum (13th edn., Stuttgart, Deutsche Bibel Gesellschaft, 1985). The Hebrew text used will be the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (Stuttgart, 1977).

SECTION A: CORE SUBJECTS

Candidates must offer ONE paper from EACH of the Core Subjects A.I to A.IV below.

A.I. THE OLD TESTAMENT

All candidates must offer either paper (1) or paper (2).

(1) Israel to the end of the Exile The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Exodus 1–3; 6; 12–15; 19; 20; 24. (b) Isaiah 1–12; 28–32. (c) Psalms 2; 18; 45–8; 72; 74; 77; 89; 93; 110; 132; 137. (d) 2 Kings 18–25. (e) Ezekiel 1–18.

(2) Israel from the beginning of the Exile to 4 BC

The paper will include historical, literary, and theological questions, and candidates will be required to comment on passages from the following texts in English, showing knowledge of at least three of the five groups of texts:

(a) Job 1–14; 38–42. (b) Nehemiah 1: 1–11: 2; 13. (c) Jonah; Ruth. (d) Daniel. (e) Isaiah 40–55.

A.II. THE NEW TESTAMENT

All candidates must offer either paper (3) or paper (4).

(3) The Four Gospels

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of the four Gospels, including the theology of the evangelists and historical research concerning the person and teaching of Jesus, and to translate and comment (including grammatical comment) on passages in Greek from Matthew and John and on passages in Greek from Mark and Luke parallel to Matthew 3–17 inclusive.

(4) The Theology and Ethics of the New Testament (with special reference to the gospels of Matthew and John, Romans, and I Corinthians)

A large choice of essay questions will give candidates an opportunity to show knowledge of the historical Jesus and of New Testament writers and writings in addition to those specified. Texts will be studied in English, except for one question on which candidates will comment on passages in Greek from Matthew and John. This question will be compulsory for candidates for the BA in Theology who have not passed either paper 6 (New Testament Greek) or 7 (Biblical Hebrew) in the Preliminary Examination for Theology. It is optional for all other candidates.

A.III. PATRISTICS

All candidates must offer paper (5)

(5) The Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to AD 451

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the main lines of development of Christian Doctrine and to be able to discuss these in relation to the historical conditions which influenced that development. They will be expected to show some awareness of primary sources in English translation.

Candidates may be required to comment on quotations from the following texts:

The Creed of the Synod of Nicaea (in W.G. Rusch, The Trinitarian Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

The Second Letter of Cyril to Nestorius (in R.A. Norris, The Christological Controversy, Philadelphia: Fortress Press).

The Tome of Leo (in Norris, op. cit.)

The Definition of the Council of Chalcedon (in Norris, op. cit.)

Credit will be given to candidates who show knowledge of the other texts contained in the volumes by Rusch and Norris. All candidates will be required to show knowledge of the meaning and use, at any time within the period up 451, of the following terms: prosopon, persona, hypostasis, ousia, homoousios.

A.IV. CHRISTIAN DOCTRINE AND INTERPRETATION

All candidates must offer paper (6).

(6) Christian Doctrine and Interpretation

The paper will consist of questions on the major themes of Christian Doctrine and the norms and methods of Christian Theology. Candidates will be expected to show a critical understanding of twentieth–century theological discussion and its use of the Bible and traditional formulations, and of some of the problems posed for such discussions by modern intellectual developments.

SECTION B: ALTERNATIVE TRACKS

Candidates must offer four papers from ONE of the Alternative Tracks B.I and B.II below.

ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.I.

Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

ONE paper being Old and New Testament Studies (paper 7);

ONE chosen from EITHER paper (8) (Luke–Acts, Epistles and Apocalypse) OR whichever of papers (1) or (2) have not been offered for Section A.I;

and TWO papers not already offered chosen from amongst the papers in Sections A and B (except paper 4 and any other papers that are otherwise prohibited by the regulations) and those in C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers. With the permission of the board an essay (see regulations below) may be offered in place of one of these two papers.

(7) Old and New Testament Studies

(a) Old Testament Literature of the Exilic Age

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of the literature of the Exilic Age, and will be expected to comment either on passages from Isaiah 40–55 and Ezekiel 1–18 in English, or on passages from Isaiah 40–5 in Hebrew.

(b) The Theology and Exegesis of the Epistle to the Romans

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of Romans and to comment on the English text of the Epistle. They will also have the opportunity to translate and comment on the Greek text of Romans 3 to 8.

(8) Luke–Acts, Epistles and Apocalypse

Candidates will be expected to answer questions on two out of the following three sections, including comment questions on the English passages selected. The Greek texts also set for translation and comment are optional.

(a) Luke–Acts, with Luke 19–24 and Acts 1–15 set in English for comment, and Luke 19–24 set as optional Greek for translation and comment.

(b) The Pauline corpus (13 epistles), with 1 Corinthians and Galatians set in English for comment, and Galatians as optional Greek.

(c) Hebrews–Apocalypse, with Hebrews and 1 John set in English for comment and Hebrews 1–2 and 1 John as optional Greek.

ALTERNATIVE TRACK B.II.

Candidates offering this Track must offer FOUR papers:

ONE from papers (9), (10), and (11) below;

ONE major theologian (an option from paper 12);

ONE chosen from either papers (13) and (14) below or a second major theologian (another option from paper 12);

and any ONE paper not already offered chosen from amongst the papers in Sections A and B (except paper 4 and any other papers that are otherwise prohibited by the regulations) and those in C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers. With the permission of the board, an essay (see regulations below) may be offered in place of this paper.

(9) The History and Theology of the Western Church, 1198–1350

The paper will consist of questions on the thought of the leading scholastic theologians (especially Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham) and of questions on the main developments in the Western Church.

(10) History and Theology in Western Christianity,

1500–1619 The subject includes the work and thought of the leading reformers, especially Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, together with the radicals, and the development of the Reformation in the cities of Europe. Questions will be set both on movements in England from the Henrician reforms to the Elizabethan settlement and on the Counter–Reformation.

(11) Christian Life and Thought in Europe, 1789–1914

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the life and thought of the Christian Church (with special reference to Britain) and the development of Christian theology in its historical context.

(12) Further Studies in History and Doctrine

Candidates will study one major theologian in relation to the situation and problems of the time with special attention to certain texts. A list of theologians (with texts) on which teaching will be provided in the following academic year and on which examination questions will be set in the Final Examination at the end of that year will be published by the Board of the Faculty of Theology in the Trinity Term of each year. In the event of a candidate opting to take a year out after having studied a chosen theologian, the examiners will set questions on that theologian in the year of that candidate's examination, even if that theologian is not otherwise available for study in that year.

Texts will be studied in English. One or two optional questions may be set which will require knowledge of the texts in their original languages, when these are other than English.

A candidate may offer a second major theologian from amongst those available in the year of his or her examination. In the event that a candidate does choose to offer a second major theologian, that candidate will offer paper 12 for two of his/her papers. To facilitate this, separate papers (12(a), 12(b) etc) will be set for each major theologian.

(13) Philosophy of Religion

As specified for paper 107 in Philosophy in some Honour Schools.

(14) Christian Moral Reasoning

As specified for paper (b) (iv) in the Honour School of Philosophy and Theology.

C. SCHEDULE OF FURTHER OPTIONAL PAPERS

(15) Selected topics (Old Testament) I

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English, and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain selected chapters and sections.

(i) Prophecy

1 Samuel 9, 10.
2 Samuel 7.
1 Kings 13, 18, 22.
Isaiah 1, 5–8, 10, 40, 42, 44, 49, 51–3, 55.
Jeremiah 1–5, 7–9, 11, 12, 26–8, 31.
Ezekiel 1–4, 8–11, 14, 18, 20, 23, 36, 37.
Amos.
Zechariah 1–8, 13.

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

1 Kings 13, 18, 22.
Isaiah 40, 42, 44.
Amos 1–5.

(ii) Apocalyptic
Isaiah 24–7.
Daniel.
Joel.
Zechariah 9–14.
Enoch 45–71 (ed. H.F.D. Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984)). Jubilees 1, 20–3, 30–2 (ed. Sparks, ibid.).
Psalms of Solomon, 17, 18 (ed. Sparks, ibid.).

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Isaiah 24–7.
Zechariah 9–14.

(16) Selected topics (Old Testament) II

Candidates will be required to show detailed knowledge of one of the following topics. They will be required to comment on passages from the prescribed texts in English, and will be given an opportunity to comment upon the Hebrew text of certain selected chapters and sections.

(i) Wisdom
Proverbs 1–9, 22: 17–31: 31.
Job 1–19, 38–42.
Ecclesiastes.
Wisdom of Solomon 1–9.
Ecclesiasticus Prologue, 1: 1–25: 12, 36: 18–43: 33, 51.

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Proverbs 1–9.

(ii) Worship and Liturgy

Exodus 12–15, 19, 20, 24.
Leviticus 1–7, 16.
Deuteronomy 12–18.
1 Kings 5–8.
1 Chronicles 16.
Psalms 2, 18, 24, 27, 47–51, 68, 72, 78, 89, 95–100, 110, 113–18, 122, 124, 126, 128, 130–2.
A.E. Cowley, Aramaic Papyri of the Fifth Century B.C. (OUP, 1923), nos 21, 30–4.

Among these the following may be offered in Hebrew:

Exodus 19, 20, 24.
Leviticus 16.
Psalms 24, 95–100.

(17) The Hebrew of the Old Testament

Candidates will be required to show a general knowledge of the language, with a special study of the following prose texts from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Genesis 6–9.
Leviticus 17, 19.
1 Kings 12–19.
Nehemiah 4–6.

Candidates will also be given an opportunity to show knowledge of Hebrew verse, and especially of the following texts from which passages will be set for translation and comment:

Psalms 1, 23, 24, 46, 96–100.
Isaiah 40–5.
Joel.

Candidates who do not offer Hebrew verse will not thereby be penalised.

(18) Archaeology in relation to the Old Testament

The subject will be held to include the geography of Palestine and of the neighbouring lands; the history of the development of Canaanite, Hebrew, and Jewish social life and culture; the history of places of worship and their furniture; and the general results of recent archaeological research in the Ancient Near East in so far as they throw light on these subjects.

(19) Religions and Mythology of the Ancient Near East

The paper will include a wide range of questions. The following texts are prescribed for special study.

(a) From J.B. Pritchard, Ancient Near Eastern Texts (3rd edn., Princeton University Press, 1969). Akkadian Myths and Epics: The Creation Epic, The Epic of Gilgamesh. Hittite Myths, Epics, and Legends: Kingship in Heaven, the Telepinus Myth.

(b) Egyptian Myths, Hymns, and Prayers: M. Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1975– 80), vol. I, pp. 51–7, 131–3; vol. II, pp. 81–132, 197–9, 203–23.

(c) Ugaritic Myths, Epics, and Legends; Baal and Yam, The Palace of Baal, Baal and Mot, in J.C.L. Gibson, Canaanite Myths and Legends (2nd edn., T. and T. Clark, 1978).

(d) The Sefire Inscriptions, in J.C.L. Gibson, Textbook of Syrian Semitic Inscriptions, vol. II (OUP, 1975), pp. 18–56.

(e) Cory's Ancient Fragments of the Phoenician, Carthaginian, Babylonian, Egyptian and Other Authors, ed. E. Richmond Hodges (Reeves and Turner, 1876), pp. 1–22.

(20) The New Testament in Greek

Candidates will choose passages for translation from amongst a number taken from the Greek New Testament and will be required to show a knowledge of the critical and theological issues involved in some of the passages they translate. The selection of passages set will allow this detailed knowledge to be limited to the following texts and chapters: Acts 1–12, Romans, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Hebrews 1–2, 1 and 2 Peter, 1 John, Revelation 1–5. But there will also be opportunity to show such detailed knowledge outside these specified chapters.

(21) Varieties of Judaism 100 BC–AD 100 The paper will include a number of general questions and the following texts are prescribed for special study.

Set texts in English:

Qumran Community Rule, Commentary on Habakkuk, in G. Vermes, The
Dead Sea Scrolls in English, Pelican Books (2nd edn., 1975).
Josephus, Jewish War II (Loeb, 1956); Antiquities XVIII, 1–119 (Loeb, 1965); Against Apion II, 145–296 (Loeb, 1956).
IV Ezra (ed. B.M. Metzger in J.H. Charlesworth, ed., The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha (Darton, Congnon and Todd, 2 vols., 1983, 1985)).
Testament of Moses (ed., J. Priest in Charlesworth, op. cit.).
Wisdom of Solomon (RSV).
Philo, Migration of Abraham; Life of Moses I, 1–84 (Loeb, 1958).
Joseph and Aseneth (ed. C. Burchard in Charlesworth, op. cit.).
Psalms of Solomon VIII, IX, XVII, tr. S.P. Brock in H.F.D. Sparks, ed., The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984).
1 Enoch 37–71 (tr. M.A. Knibb in Sparks, op. cit.).
Sibylline Oracles III (ed. J.J. Collins in Charlesworth, op. cit.).

Candidates may offer any or all of the following texts in the original languages:

Qumran Community Rule 1–4, in E. Lohse, ed., Die Texte aus Qumran, Hebr<Sigma> isch und Deutsch (2nd edn., Darmstadt, Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1971).
Qumran Commentary on Habakkuk (ed. E. Lohse, op. cit.).
Philo, Life of Moses I, 1–44 (Loeb, 1958).
Josephus, Antiquities XVIII, 1–28, 63–4, 109–19 (Loeb, 1965).
Joseph and Aseneth, in M. Philonenko, ed., Joseph et As*neth (E.J. Brill, 1968).

(22) Origins and Development of the Church with Reference to the New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers

Candidates will be expected to show a knowledge of the history, worship, and institutions of the Church as these can be known from the New Testament and the Apostolic Fathers.

(23) Early Liturgy

Candidates will be expected to study the rites of initiation and the eucharist with the development of the Christian year up to AD 451 and the theology of liturgical worship in the light of anthropological, sociological, artistic, and linguistic considerations.

The following texts are set for special study:

E.C. Whitaker, Documents of the Baptismal Liturgy (2nd edn., SPCK, 1970), pp. 1–19, 30–41, 44–50, 83–5, 127–33.
R.C.D. Jasper and G.J. Cuming, Prayers of the Eucharist: Early and Reformed (3rd edn., Pueblo, 1987), pp. 7–12, 20–44, 52–81, 88–113, 129–37, 143–67.
E.J. Yarnold, The Awe Inspiring Rites of Initiation (2nd edn., T. and T. Clark, 1994), pp. 70–97.
J. Wilkinson, tr. and ed., Egeria's Travels (SPCK, 1971), pp. 123– 47 (section 24 to the end).

(24) Early Syriac Christianity

Candidates will be expected to show a general knowledge of symbolism in the theology of the early Syriac Church. The following texts are prescribed for special study:

Odes of Solomon, 6, 11, 17, 19, 21, 24, 30, 36, 42, tr. J. Emerton in H.F.D.
Sparks, The Apocryphal Old Testament (OUP, 1984). Acts of Thomas, secs 1–29, 108–14, tr. A.F.J. Klijn (E.J. Brill, 1962).
Aphrahat Demonstrations, 1, 4, 6, 12 (Dem. 1 and 6 tr. in J. Gwynn, ed., Select Library of Nicene and Post–Nicene Fathers, II, 13 (1898, repr.
W.B. Eerdmans, 1965); Dem. 4, tr. S.P. Brock in Annual of the Leeds University Oriental Society (1977); Dem. 12, tr. in J. Neusner, Aphrahat and Judaism (E.J. Brill, 1971)).
Ephrem, Sermon on our Lord, tr. in J. Gwynn, op. cit.; Hymns on the Nativity, nos 1 and 2, tr. in J. Gwynn, op. cit.; Hymns on Epiphany, no. 3, tr. in J. Gwynn, op. cit.; Hymns on Faith, no. 10, tr. R. Murray, Eastern Churches Review, 1970; Hymns on the Church, no. 36, tr. S.P. Brock, Eastern Churches Review, 1976; The hymns, tr. S.P. Brock, The Harp of the Spirit: Twelve Poems of St Ephrem (Fellowship of St. Alban and St. Sergius, 1975).
Letter to Publius, tr. S.P. Brock, Le Muséon (1976).
Book of Steps, homily 12, tr. R. Murray, Symbols of Church and Kingdom (CUP, 1975).

(25) History and Theology of the Church in the Byzantine Empire from AD 1000 to AD 1453

Candidates will be expected to show knowledge of the constitution and worship of the Church; monasticism; the development of mystical theology; the relations between Church and state and with the Western Church.

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(26) Christian Spirituality Candidates will be expected to discuss Christian prayer in its theological, psychological, and historical aspects, paying particular attention to contemplation and mystical prayer. There will be four groups of texts and candidates will be expected to have studied two of them.

1. Patristics

Gregory of Nyssa, The Life of Moses, bk. II, tr. A.J. Malherbe and E. Ferguson, The Classics of Western Spirituality (Paulist Press 1978), pp. 55–137.
*Evagrius Ponticus, The Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer.
Macarius, Homilies I, V, XV, tr. A.J. Mason in Fifty Spiritual Homilies of St Macarius the Egyptian (SPCK, 1921).
*Dionysius the Areopagite, The Mystical Theology.

*Copies of translations of these works are available in the Faculty Library.

2. English Fourteenth–century Mysticism

The Cloud of Unknowing, trans. J. Walsh, (Classics of Western Spirituality

(SPCK/Paulist Press, 1978)).
Julian of Norwich, The Revelations of Divine Love, tr. E. Colledge and J. Walsh, The Classics of Western Spirituality (SPCK/Paulist Press, 1978).

3. Spanish Mysticism Teresa of Avila, Interior Castle, tr. by Allison Peers in Complete Works, vol. II (Sheed and Ward, 1946, pp. 199–351).
John of the Cross, Living Flame of Love, 2nd redaction, tr. Allison Peers, in Complete Works, vol. III (three vols in one, Anthony Clarke, 1978), pp. 103–95.

4. The Wesleys and William Law Texts in A.C. Outler, ed., John Wesley, Library of Protestant Theology (OUP, 1964), pp. 197–231, 251–98 (i.e. Sermon on Justification by Faith; Sermon on The Witness of the Spirit; Discourse II on The Law established by Faith; Sermon on Christian Perfection; The Scripture Way of Salvation; Thoughts on Christian Perfection).
E.H. Sugden, ed., The Standard Sermons of John Wesley, vol. II (7th edn., Epworth Press, 1968). Sermons: 32 (The Nature of Enthusiasm); 34 (Catholic Spirit); 39 (New Birth); 40 (Wilderness State).
H.A. Hodges and A.M. Allchin, A Rapture of Praise: Hymns of John and Charles Wesley (Hodder and Stoughton, 1966). The following hymns: 3, 9, 22, 27, 38, 54, 55, 81, 84, 90, 105, 118, 124, 126, 131.
William Law, The Spirit of Prayer: Part I, ed. S. Spencer (James Clarke, 1969).

(27) The Sociology of Religion The paper will consist of two parts. Candidates will be expected to answer at least one question from each part.

1. Texts Candidates will be expected to know at least two of the following options in detail:

(i) K. Marx, Theses on Feuerbach and The German Ideology (ch. 1) (ed. C. Arthur, Lawrence and Wishart, London, 1985), together with Capital (ch. 1 and 13) (Penguin Books, 1990).

(ii) E. Durkheim, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life (Allen and Unwin, London, 1976).

(iii) M. Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Rise of Capitalism (Harper Collins, 1991).

(iv) E. Troeltsch, The Social Teaching of the Christian Churches (2 Vols. Jn. Knox, 1992) .

(v) Religion and History, ed. Adams (T. and T. Clark, 1991).

(vi) Talcott Parsons, Action Theory and the Human Condition (New York, 1978) .

2. Themes Candidates will be expected to be able to discuss the following issues in their relation to religious formations; class, gender, race, legitimation, power structures, violence, sects, and cults. Questions will be set on sociological readings of other parts of the Theology syllabus, including Biblical studies, doctrine, and church history. Familiarity with contemporary sociological discussion will be assumed.

(28) Psychology of Religion The paper will cover theories about aspects of behaviour or experience relevant to religion and the empirical evidence on these theories. Psychological research methods and their applicability to different aspects of religion such as conversion, prayer, worship. Cognitive and non–cognitive (i.e. psychoanalytic and affective) accounts of religion. Normal and abnormal religious behaviour. Origin and development of religious concepts. Moral development. Constructs of theological psychology (e.g. soul; conscience, sin and guilt; repentance; forgiveness; mercy) and their status in contemporary psychology. Psychology applied to pastoral concerns: religious education; marriage; health; death and bereavement; substance abuse.

(29) World Religions I: Islam Candidates will make a special study of Islam, with the prescribed texts in English.

(a) A.J. Arberry, The Koran Interpreted (OUP, repr. 1983) , from which the following material is prescribed:

Sura 1; Sura 2; Sura 3. 42–7, 52–4, 95–7; Sura 4. 15–16, 43, 155–9, 171–2; Sura 5. 33–5; Sura 6. 102–3; Sura 7. 1–24, 172– 80; Sura 16. 1–23; Sura 17. 110–11; Sura 19. 22–36, 41–50; Sura 24. 2–9, 35–40; Sura 28. 29–43; Sura 30. 48–54; Sura 35. 38– 9; Sura 48. 29; Sura 67. 1–6; Sura 68. 1–7; Sura 69. 13–37; Sura 77; Sura 81. 1–21; Sura 96. 1–19.

(b) J.A. Williams, ed., Themes of Islamic Civilisation (University of California Press, repr. 1982) .

(c) K. Cragg and M. Speight, Islam from Within, Wadsworth, 1980.

(30) World Religions II: Buddhism Candidates will make a special study of Buddhism with the prescribed texts in English.

(a) Texts in W. Rahula, What the Buddha Taught (2nd edn., Gordon Fraser, 1967) , pp. 91–138.

(b) Texts in E. Conze, Buddhist Scriptures (Penguin, 1959).

(31) World Religions III: Hinduism Candidates will make a special study of Hinduism, with the prescribed texts in English.

(a) R.C. Zaehner, ed., Hindu Scriptures (Everyman Library, repr. 1986 with updated bibliography by B.K. Matilal).

(b) J.L. Brockington, The Sacred Thread: Hinduism in its continuity and diversity (Edinburgh University Press, 1981).

Prospective candidates for papers (29) , (30) , and (31) are advised that teaching may not be available every year in all these religions; so persons who may wish to offer one or both of these papers are recommended to seek advice about whether teaching will be available on the religion(s) of their choice.

(32) The Formation of Rabbinic Judaism (70 CE–950 CE)

The course will describe the formation of rabbinic Judaism as reflected in its primary texts. Some reference will be made to the contexts of late Antiquity, early Christendom, and the Zoroastrian and Islamic worlds.

It will consider the following issues:

How did the rabbis translate (Targum) and interpret (Midrash) the Hebrew scriptures? How did they structure the religious system which emerged from their reflections on scripture (Mishna/Tosefta) ? What forms of liturgy and spirituality did they create, and how did they relate to the Jewish mystical tradition?

The Babylonian Talmud and its definition of Torah. Judaism under Islam—the Gaonic period. Confrontation with other faiths, with rationalist philosophy, and with serious critiques of both scripture and the rabbinic tradition.

The following primary rabbinic texts in translation are set for special study:

The Daily Prayer Book of the United Hebrew Congregations of the British Commonwealth of Nations, (Centenary Edition, London: Singer's Prayer Book Publication Committee, 1990) : pages 46, 56 (Amida prayer) and 251– 4 (Ethics of the Fathers chapter 1) )

The Mishnah translated by H. Danby. (London: Oxford University Press, 1933).

Tractate Berakhoth chapters 4, 5; tractate Baba Kamma chapter 8.

Lauterbach, J.Z., Mekilta deRabbi Ishmael (text and translation)

(3 vols. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society of America, 1933–35). The section of the Ten Commandments, in vol. 2.

Cohn–Sherbok, Dan. Jewish Mysticism: An Anthology. (Oxford: Oneworld Publications, 1995). Extracts on pages 59–62; 68–71.

Saadia Gaon, The Book of Beliefs and Opinions tr. Samuel Rosenblatt. (New Haven: Yale University Press and London: Oxford University Press, 1948) , pages 137– 163 (`Concerning Command and Prohibition').'

(33) Any other subject that may be approved by the Board of the Faculty of Theology from time to time by regulation published in the Gazette and communicated to college tutors by the end of the first week of the Trinity Full Term in the academic year preceding the examination in which the option will be available.

Optional translation papers (2 hours each)

The translation components of papers (17) , The Hebrew of the Old Testament, and (20) , The New Testament in Greek, may be offered individually as optional extra papers by candidates who are not taking one or both of the full papers.

Regulations concerning essays

1. In Alternative Track B.I two papers, and in Alternative Track B.II one paper, may be chosen from amongst those not already offered in Section A, Section B, and Section C, the Schedule of Further Optional Papers, subject to the restrictions specified in each Alternative Track. A candidate may offer an extended essay in place of one of these papers, as specified in the regulations governing his/her Alternative Track, provided that prior approval of the subject has been obtained from the Board of the Faculty of Theology. Candidates should in general aim at a length of 10,000 words, but must not exceed 15,000 words (both figures inclusive of notes and appendices, but excluding bibliography).

2. The candidate's application should be submitted through and with the support of his or her college tutor or the tutor with overall responsibility for his or her studies, from whom he or she should seek guidance on whether the subject is likely to be acceptable to the board.

3. The board's approval must be sought not later than Friday in the fourth week of Trinity Full Term in the year preceding the examination. The request for approval should be addressed to the Secretary of the Board of the Faculty of Theology, University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford. The request must be accompanied by a letter from the tutor stating that this subject has his or her approval. The application should include, in about 100 words, an explanation as to how the topic will be treated, and, where appropriate, a brief bibliography.

4. The candidate is advised to have an initial discussion with his or her tutor regarding the proposed field of study, the sources available, and the method of presentation. He or she may also have one further discussion with his or her tutor on his or her approach to the subject. His or her tutor may also read and comment on a first draft.

5. The subject of the essay need not fall within the areas covered by the papers listed in the Honour School of Theology. It may overlap any subject or period on which the candidate offers papers, but the candidate is warned against reproducing the content of his or her essay in any answer to a question in the examination. Subject to the provisions of cl. 4 above, every candidate shall sign a certificate to the effect that the essay is his or her own work and that it has not already been submitted (wholly or substantially) for a final honour school other than one involving Theology, or another degree of this University, or a degree of any other institution. This certificate shall be presented together with the essay. No essay shall, however, be ineligible because it has been or is being submitted for any prize of this University.

6. The candidate must submit one typed copy of the essay (bound or held firmly in a stiff cover) , addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners, Honour School of Theology, Examination Schools, Oxford, not later than noon on the Friday of the eighth week of Hilary Term in the academic year in which he or she is presenting himself or herself for examination. The certificate signed by the candidate in accordance with cl. 5 above must be submitted separately in a sealed envelope addressed to the Chairman of the Examiners at the above adddress at the same time as the essay is submitted.'

(c) Pass School of Theology

(i) With effect from 1 October 1996 for one year (for examination in 1997 only)

As for the Honour School of Theology (see (b) (i) above).

(ii) With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1999)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 541, ll. 7–9, delete `, save that paper (b) (i) ... (The Four Gospels) '.

2 Ibid., ll. 11–12, delete `section A ... Christian Doctrine' and substitute `amongst papers 1 (Israel to the beginning of the Exile) , 2 (Israel from the end of the Exile to 4 BC) , 3 (The Four Gospels) , and 4 (The Theology and Ethics of the New Testament) ; and at least one from amongst papers 5 (The Development of Doctrine in the Early Church to AD 451) , 6 (Christian Doctrine and Interpretation) , 9 (The History and Theology of the Western Church, 1198–1350) , 10 (The History and Theology in Western Christianity, 1500–1619) , and 11 (Christian Life and Thought in Europe, 1789–1914) '.

3 Ibid., l. 14, delete `including ... papers' and substitute `excluding the two papers they are required to offer under cl. 2 above'.

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(d) Certificates in Theology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 935, ll. 10–12, delete `in May . . . in October' and substitute `in April or May, beginning on the Monday of the second week of Trinity Term, and in September or October'.

2 Ibid., p. 936, l. 48 note*, delete `third' and substitute

`second'.

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(e) Bachelor of Theology

With effect from 1 October 1996 (for first examination in 1997)

As for Certificates in Theology (see (d) above).

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17 Committee on Continuing Education

(a) Diploma in Biblical and Theological Studies

With effect from 1 October 1996

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 925, after l. 27 insert:

`Biblical and Theological Studies

1. Course

The course will consist of lectures, tutorials, seminars and classes, together with day schools and a residential course. Candidates will be required also to undertake supervised pastoral practice and preaching. The course may be taken on a part-time basis only over a period of at least one year and no more than two years. Candidates will be expected to have completed the Certificate in Biblical and Theological Studies offered by the Department for Continuing Education or an equivalent course of study approved by the board of studies.

2.The subjects of the course will include:

(a) Old Testament Studies

(b) New Testament Studies

(c) The Study of Christian Doctrine

(d) Church History and Historical Theology

(e) Pastoral Theology

(f) Christian Ethics and Moral Theology

(g) The Social Context of Theology

()h) Missiology

(i) Philosophy of Religion

(j) The Liturgy and the Theology of the Sacraments.

3. Every candidate will be required to satisfy the examiners in the following:

(i) Three essays, each of no more than 3,000 words, one to be chosen from courses (a)–(d) and two to be chosen from courses (e)–(j). Essays must be the candidate's own work and every candidate must submit a statement to that effect.

(ii) A dissertation of up to 10,000 words on a topic to be agreed by the board of studies. The dissertation must be the candidate's own work and every candidate must submit a statement to that effect.

(iii) A report of the period of supervised pastoral practice and preaching from a candidate's supervisor appointed for this purpose by the course directors, after consultation with the external examiner.

4. The examiners may award a distinction to candidates for the Diploma.

5. Candidates who fail to satisfy the examiners in the assignments under 3 (i), or the dissertation under 3 (ii), or both, may be permitted to re-submit work in respect of the part or parts of the examination which they have failed for examination on not more than one occasion which shall normally be within one year of the intial failure.'

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(b) Foundation Certificate in Social and Political Science

With effect from 1 October 1997 (for first examination in 1998)

In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 959, delete ll. 32–43 and substitute:

`II Seven coursework essays as specified below. The relevant board of studies of the Committee on Continuing Education will specify the length and format of the assignments and the times at which they must be submitted. The titles of the assignments will be approved by the examiners at the beginning of each year. Essays must be the candidate's own work and every candidate must submit a statement to that effect.

(a) Introduction to Philosophy

(b) Theoretical Statistical Analysis I

(c) Applied Statistical Analysis II

(d) Analysis of Social Inequalities in Britain

(e) Introduction to Logic

(f) Political Ideologies I

(g) Political Ideologies II'.

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(c) Master of Science in Software Engineering

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decreees, 1995, p. 755, add new clause 7 and renumber following clauses:

`7. Any candidate who has successfully completed the Certificate in Software Engineering, or who has successfully completed the written assignments required as part of the course for the Certificate of Software Engineering, may on admission to the M.Sc. be exempted from the requirement to submit, for the examination for this degree, up to four of the nine written assignments under 3 (i) above.'

2 Ibid., delete l. 37 and substitute:

`Postgraduate Diploma, or Certificate, or if any candidate who is successful in the examination for the Postgraduate Diploma has previously successfully completed the Certificate, the subsequent award will subsume his or her previous award.'

3 Ibid., l. 27, as amended by Regulation of 11 January 1996 (Gazette, Vol. 126, p. 550), delete `and project report.'

4 Ibid., l. 30, as amended, insert `up to' before `seven'.

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(d) Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering

With immediate effect

1 In Examination Decrees, 1995, p. 923, l. 13, after `higher education.' insert:

`Any candidate who has successfully completed the Certificate in Software Engineering, or who has successfully completed the written assignments required as part of the course for the Certificate of Software Engineering, may on admission to the Postgraduate Diploma be exempted from the requirement to submit, for the examination for the Diploma, up to four of the seven written assignments under 2 (b) above.'

2 Ibid., as amended by Regulation of 11 January 1996 (Gazette, Vol. 126, p. 551), after l. 13 as amended insert new cl. 6:

`6. If any candidate who is successful in the examination for the Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering has previously successfully completed the Certificate in Software Engineering, the Postgraduate Diploma will subsume his or her certificate.'

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