Viv McLean - piano recital | University of Oxford

Viv McLean - piano recital

Viv McLean
19:30 - 21:30
109A Iffley Road
Oxford
Concerts
£18, £12, £8 (£5 discount students and under 18's)
Yes
Recommended

Programme

Mozart: Sonata in E Flat K. 282
Schumann: Arabeske Op. 18
Beethoven: Sonata in C Op. 53 "Waldstein"
Chopin: Nocturne in E flat Op. 9 No.2
Fantasy-Impromptu in C sharp minor, Op 66
Polonaise in C Sharp Minor Op. 26 No. 1
Ballade No. 3 in A Flat Op. 47
Nocturne in C Sharp Minor Op. Post.
Ballade No. 1 in G Minor Op. 23

Winner of the First Prize at the 2002 Maria Canals International Piano Competition in Barcelona, Viv McLean has performed at all the major venues in the UK as well as throughout Europe, Japan, Australia and the USA. 
Recent concerto highlights include Mozart K. 467 with the English Chamber Orchestra at the Royal Festival Hall, Grieg with the London Philharmonic Orchestra at the Barbican and a tour of the USA with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra performing Gershwin.

Viv also plays with leading chamber music groups and has collaborated with musicians such as Natalie Clein, Marianne Thorsen, Lawrence Power, Eijin Nimura, Phillip Dukes, Kate Gould, Guy Johnston, David Le Page, Carl Davis and Marvin Hamlisch. He has recorded regularly for BBC Radio 3 since making his recital debut through the BBC Radio 3 Young Artists Forum scheme and has also recorded recitals for Classic FM, WDR Radio in Germany, Radio France, ABC Radio in Australia, NRK Radio in Norway and for the Sky Arts television channel.Viv studied at the Royal Academy of Music with Hamish Milne where he held the Hodgson Fellowship and was made an Associate of the Royal Academy in 2005. Whilst studying at the Academy, he was the piano winner at the Royal Overseas-League Music Competition and was selected as one of three winners of the National Federation of Music Societies' Young Artists Competition, leading to various recitals and concerto appearances throughout Great Britain.

"Viv McLean revealed extraordinary originality, superb simplicity, and fingers of steel hidden behind muscles of velvet. He is an otherworldly young man - he plays with the genius one finds in those who know how to forget themselves, naturally placing themselves at the right point to meet the music, this mystery of the moment.
"
Le Monde, Paris