The power of the crowd: Combining open science, citizen science and the internet to generate reproducible knowledge | University of Oxford

The power of the crowd: Combining open science, citizen science and the internet to generate reproducible knowledge

Speaker
Chris Chambers
Event date
Event time
14:00 - 15:00
Venue
Oxford Internet Institute
1 St Giles
Oxford
Oxfordshire
OX1 3JS
Venue details

Seminar Room, 1 St Giles

Event type
Lectures and seminars
Event cost
Free
Disabled access?
No
Booking required
Required

The OII Bellwether Lectures bring world-leading intellectuals to Oxford to lecture on the social implications of the Internet, and its role in shaping our economic, political, and social future.
The lecture will be one hour, followed by refresehements.
Registration will close at 12:00 the day of the event.
About the Event
In this lecture Chris will discuss the opportunities and challenges provided by mass internet-based data collection and how, in combination with open science practices, this approach can help usher in a new era of robust scientific research. He will focus in particular on two of my current projects: an upcoming research platform we are launching later this year in partnership with the Guardian as part of a European Research Council project on eating behaviour, and the use of citizen science to perform a mass consultation of MPs about a new service for supporting evidence-based policy. Both projects utilise open science practices such as study pre-registration and open data archiving, ensuring that findings are transparent, reproducible, and reusable to other researchers and the public. He will also discuss challenges with this approach, including the ethics of consent and unanticipated recruitment of vulnerable groups.
About the Speaker
Chris Chambers is a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the School of Psychology and Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre. In addition to his core research focus in human self control, his interests include open science practices, the role of science in the media, and mechanisms for promoting evidence-based public policy. He also co-hosts the Guardian psychology blog, Head Quarters.
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