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Admissions

A BA in 3 years, a BM BCh in 6 years
UCAS code: A100

Course statistics for 2013 entry

Interviewed: 30%
Successful: 10%
Intake: 149

Tuition fees for 2014

Home/EU: £9,000/year
No upfront costs: you can get a loan for the full amount
Grants, bursaries and scholarships available

Medicine is a single six-year course for fees purposes. You will be charged fees related to your year of entry to the pre-clinical course.

More information

Programme Specification

www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/medicine
admissions@medschool.ox.ac.uk

Open days

2 and 3 July, and 19 September 2014

 

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Medicine

Courses tab icon About the course Course outline Entrance requirements How to apply

These courses are intended for students with a particular enthusiasm for the science that supports Medicine and its continuing advancement.

The standard course (A100)

We have retained a course with distinct pre-clinical and clinical sections that includes studying towards a BA Honours degree in Medical Sciences.

Applicants are initially admitted to the pre-clinical section of the course. Entry to the Oxford Clinical School is competitive; however, a joint admissions scheme is in place with the Universities of Cambridge and London to ensure that all suitably qualified Oxford pre-clinical students will be allocated a clinical school place within the scheme. The majority of students continue their clinical training in Oxford. Upon successful completion of clinical training and the award of the BM BCh degree, subsequent years are spent on Foundation and Specialist Training programmes.

The first five terms are devoted to preparing for the ‘First BM’ (the 'First Examination for the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery'). This addresses not only much of the science that underpins Medicine, but also the clinical problems that arise when systems fail. Students are introduced to the major systems of the body and study all aspects of their structure and function in health and also the principles of disease processes. Students are encouraged to develop an enquiring approach and to consider the experimental basis of the science in the course. Matters of clinical relevance are illustrated from the outset. There are clinical demonstrations, and students make regular visits to GP tutors.

Following the First BM, students spend four terms studying for a BA Honours degree (the ‘Final Honour School’) in Medical Sciences. Students specialise in an area of biomedical science selected from one of five options. They will become fully accustomed to working from research papers and primary sources in the literature, and will be encouraged to think both critically and creatively. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of their chosen option, and will improve their technical ability both at the bench and in the use of electronic resources to handle and present experimental results and to search scientific databases.

The Principles of Clinical Anatomy course, delivered at the end of the third year, is designed to teach students clinically relevant aspects of anatomy that will be of immediate use in their clinical years. This is compulsory for students progressing to clinical training at Oxford or elsewhere, but does not impact on the degree classification obtained for the BA in Medical Sciences.

The Pre-clinical stage

Applicants are initially admitted to the pre-clinical stage of the course.

The first five terms of this course are devoted to the ‘First BM’. This addresses not only much of the science that underpins Medicine, but also the clinical problems that arise when systems fail. Students are introduced to the major systems of the body and study all aspects of their structure and function in health and also the principles of disease processes. Students are encouraged to develop an enquiring approach and to consider the experimental basis of the science in the course. Matters of clinical relevance are illustrated from the outset. There are clinical demonstrations in hospitals, and students make regular visits to GP tutors.

The First BM is followed by a four-term BA Honours course (the ‘Final Honour School’) in Medical Sciences. Students specialise in an area of biomedical science selected from one of five options. They will become fully accustomed to working from research papers and primary sources in the literature, and will be encouraged to think both critically and creatively. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of their chosen option, and will improve their technical ability both at the bench and in the use of electronic resources to handle and present experimental results and to search scientific databases.

The Principles of Clinical Anatomy course, delivered at the end of the third year, is designed to teach students clinically relevant aspects of anatomy that will be of immediate use in their clinical years.

Teaching methods and study support

During the pre-clinical stage of the course, the college tutorial system is a central feature: students see their tutors and are taught weekly in groups often as small as two. This teaching can be tailored to individuals’ needs and interests. Most University lectures, seminars and practical classes take place in the Medical Sciences Teaching Centre in the Science Area. Lecturers are drawn from Oxford’s extensive pre-clinical and clinical departments, all of which have international reputations for excellence     in research, and the courses are organised on an interdisciplinary basis so as to emphasise the interrelatedness of all aspects of the curriculum.

Research work

In addition to taking written and computer-based examinations, and submitting practical reports and an extended essay, students undertake a research project as part of their BA course. This will be in a field of interest to the student, and will offer valuable first-hand experience of scientific research. Students have the opportunity to undertake research in a laboratory from a wide range of departments within the University.

A typical weekly timetable

During the First BM, lectures and practicals occupy about half of the time, and the remainder is free for tutorial work, self-directed study and extra-curricular activities. During the BA course, formal lecturing is kept to a minimum, and students are mostly free to pursue their research and to prepare for tutorials and seminars. Strong academic support ensures that students manage their time effectively.

First BM Part 1 - Terms 1-3

Courses

  • Organisation of the body
  • Physiology and pharmacology
  • Biochemistry and medical genetics
  • Population health: Medical sociology
  • Patient and Doctor course

 Assessment

  • Three core knowledge computer-based assessments
  • Four written papers
  • Satisfactory practical record
First BM Part 2 - Terms 4 -6

Courses

  • Applied physiology and pharmacology
  • The nervous system
  • Principles of pathology
  • Psychology for medicine
  • Patient and Doctor course

Assessment

  • Three core knowledge computer-based assessments
  • Four written papers
  • Satisfactory practical record
Final Honour School in Medical Sciences - Terms 6–9

Courses

  • Option (one from: Neuroscience; Molecular medicine; Infection and immunity; Cardiovascular, renal and respiratory biology; Cellular physiology and pharmacology)
  • Research project
  • Extended essay
  • Principles of clinical anatomy

Assessment

  • Written papers
  • Submission of extended essay and research project write-up
  • Oral presentation of research project
  • Qualifying exam in Principles of clinical anatomy: computer-based assessment

To progress to clinical training, at the end of Term 9 students take:

Course

  • Principles of Clinical Anatomy

Assessment



  • Three computer-based assessments

Progress to Clinical training

In December of the third year, students must apply to be accepted by a clinical school. Currently a joint admissions scheme (under review) is in place with the Universities of Cambridge and London to ensure that all suitably qualified Oxford pre-clinical students will be allocated a clinical school place within the scheme. Of those who choose to apply to the Oxford Clinical School, about 85% have been successful in past years. The rest mostly go to London or to Cambridge. No student is guaranteed a place in Oxford, but there are sufficient places in the system to ensure that all qualified students will find a place for their clinical training. Upon completion of the clinical stage of the course, the subsequent years are spent on Foundation and Specialist Training programmes.

Next

The accelerated (graduate entry) course (A101)

Graduates in experimental science subjects may be eligible to apply for the four-year accelerated course (UCAS code A101 BMBCh4). After a special two-year transition phase covering both basic science and clinical skills, the accelerated programme leads into the final two years of the standard course and to the same Oxford medical qualification as the standard (six-year) course. The four-year course is designed specifically for science graduates, and places a strong emphasis on the scientific basis of medical practice.

 

Applicants to the four-year accelerated course must follow the same application procedure as for the standard course (including the BMAT), and also complete an additional Oxford application form. See www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/medicine for further information and details of eligibility.