The facts | University of Oxford
Student in lab
UNIQ student in the lab
Credit: John Cairns

The facts

Who goes to oxford?

Here are some facts about who goes to Oxford as an undergraduate:

  • There are more than 11,700 undergraduates at Oxford in total, usually studying on three or four-year courses.
  • Every year we admit around 3,200 new undergraduates.
  • Almost four fifths of those places go to UK students.
  • Most of the UK intake went to state schools (this year it is over 60%), and that proportion has been rising.
  • The proportion of the UK intake from a Black or minority ethnic background is just under 18% and has been rising markedly.
  • Admissions from low-income neighbourhoods are up by 50% over the last four years.

Who is under-represented at oxford?

Getting into Oxford is very competitive and when we make someone an offer it will be at least AAA at A-level, or the equivalent in other qualifications. Some of our science degrees require one or more A* in specific subjects.

We hope to attract applications from a significant share of the school students who are expected to achieve at these levels. But the evidence suggests that in some cases we don’t.

Our data suggests that we should be attracting more applications than we have in the past from some groups and communities, particularly:

  • Regions outside the South of England, and other nations of the UK.
  • State schools.
  • Low-income neighbourhoods.
  • Some ethnic minority communities.
  • Young people in care, or who are caring for a family member.
  • Students who identify with several or even all of these categories.

We recognise that there are reasons why Oxford won’t be attractive to some people thinking of university. We may not offer the course they want to do. They may prefer a different part of the country or somewhere closer to home. It’s especially hard for us to attract candidates from Scotland and Northern Ireland who face lower fees to study at home than they would if they studied in England. But we still want to ensure that all potential candidates know what we offer and know they would be most welcome. Increasing our diversity will bring benefits for Oxford and all our students, as a wider range of backgrounds, perspectives and experience will encourage more open, creative and reflective learning.

There’s much more detail on this in the Annual Admissions Statistical Report available at ox.ac.uk/adstats

The University has access targets which form part of the Access and Participation Plan between the University of Oxford and the Office for Students. Our Access and Participation Plan is available to download.